Teaching Reading to Children with Down Syndrome

A Guide for Parents and Teachers

Teaching Reading to Children with Down Syndrome

Presents a recognised reading programme for children with Down syndrome which effectively meets each child's unique learning needs and style. The reading method and lessons presented here are specifically designed to be motivating, fun, and rewarding. Using flash cards, games, charts, and books, the programme emphasises that most children with Down syndrome are visual learners. Parents can customise lessons to capture their child's interest and set the learning pace to a level for greatest success. This step-by-step guide to reading allows parents to work with their child at home and helps them coordinate reading lessons with teachers, ensuring the continuity of their child's education year after year.

A Reading and Language Intervention for Children with Down Syndrome - Teacher’s Handbook

A Reading and Language Intervention for Children with Down Syndrome - Teacher’s Handbook

The Reading and Language Intervention for Children with Down Syndrome (RLI) teaches language and literacy skills following evidence-based principles adapted to meet the children’s specific learning needs. It is designed for pupils with Down syndrome aged 5 to 11 years. The intervention is suitable for beginning readers through to those with reading ages up to 8 years and for students with a wide range of language abilities. Teaching is adapted to meet individual needs through initial assessments of skills and regular monitoring of progress. Together with two accompanying DVDs illustrating teaching techniques and a CD of resources, the handbook offers teachers and teaching assistants the detailed guidance, assessment tools and example teaching materials needed to implement the intervention.

Speech and Language Development for Children with Down Syndrome (5-11 Years)

Speech and Language Development for Children with Down Syndrome (5-11 Years)

Children with Down syndrome have significant delays in speech and language skills which will affect their progress during their primary school years. This module provides guidelines for the assessment of vocabulary, grammar, speech sound production and interactive communication skills, and activities to progress children's skills across all of these areas. The authors emphasise the importance of improving the quality and quantity of everyday communication experience for children with Down syndrome and the equally essential need to work on targeted activities for both speech and language skills. The majority of speech and language targets can be incorporated into the regular curriculum and daily activities in the classroom. This module follows on from Speech and language development for individuals with Down syndrome - An overview DSii-03-01] which should be read first, to provide the reader with an adequate understanding of speech and language development to be successful in using this programme.

Reading and Writing Development for Teenagers with Down Syndrome (11-16 Years)

Reading and Writing Development for Teenagers with Down Syndrome (11-16 Years)

Reading skills are often a strength for teenagers with Down syndrome. Teenagers can often read at a higher level than would be predicted from their general cognitive and language abilities. Those who have not achieved reading success in their primary years may make significant progress during their teenage years. Reading and writing skills are important for everyday life and for access to the world of literature. They are also powerful tools for developing the speech and language of teenagers with Down syndrome and for mediating their cognitive development. Reading and writing can support communication, enable teenagers to achieve greater independence and enrich education and academic attainments across the curriculum. This module explains how language and literacy teaching can work together to promote the development of teenagers with Down syndrome. Guidance on teaching methods, expectations and examples of teenagers' work combine to show teachers and parents how to include teenagers in literacy learning programmes, with an understanding of particular issues related to speech, language and memory development.This module should be read in conjunction with Reading and writing for individuals with Down syndrome: An overview, DSii-07-01] as the overview provides important background information on how individuals learn to read, the adaptations that will help pupils with Down syndrome, and the benefits of being involved in reading instruction

Whole Child Reading

A Quick-Start Guide to Teaching Students with Down Syndrome and Other Developmental Delays

Whole Child Reading

Discover the keys to teaching children and adults with Down syndrome and other developmental disabilities how to read for meaning. Written for today's busy parents and teachers, this easy-to-use guide explains how to "go in through the heart" to hook beginning and struggling readers with high-interest, individualised materials -- flashcards, personal books, and modified trade books. The simple strategies described are designed to "teach to the brain" and are based on research about how we learn most easily and naturally. The methods in the book can be adapted for learners of any age who are reading at a third grade level or below. One of the main strategies is "Fast Flash, which involves making flash cards of the words the child is learning and then showing them to him or her as quickly as possible. Another strategy is "Sandwich Style, a motivating method of alternating fun reading activities with less-fun, but equally important ones. The crux of the instructional method described in the book is to teach the child to sight read for content before focusing on phonetics. The book emphasises providing new or struggling readers with books that are intensely interesting to them about topics they love in order to get them excited about reading. With the help of plentiful illustrations, author Natalie Hale explains how best to motivate new readers using a combination of home-made and adapted materials. Whether or not you have any formal teaching experience, you can easily work the reading activities described into your child's routine at home. And, if you have at least five minutes a day to spend on reading, you have enough time to get started using Whole Child Reading!

Handbook of Pediatric Neuropsychology

Handbook of Pediatric Neuropsychology

ìBy far, the most comprehensive and detailed coverage of pediatric neuropsychology available in a single book today, Davis provides coverage of basic principles of pediatric neuropsychology, but overall the work highlights applications to daily practice and special problems encountered by the pediatric neuropsychologist.î Cecil R. Reynolds, PhD Texas A&M University "The breadth and depth of this body of work is impressive. Chapters written by some of the best researchers and authors in the field of pediatric neuropsychology address every possible perspective on brain-behavior relationships culminating in an encyclopedic textÖ. This [book] reflects how far and wide pediatric neuropsychology has come in the past 20 years and the promise of how far it will go in the next." Elaine Fletcher-Janzen, EdD, NCSP, ABPdN The Chicago School of Professional Psychology "...it would be hard to imagine a clinical situation in pediatric neuropsychology in whichthis book would fail as a valuable resource."--Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology "I believe there is much to recommend this hefty volume. It is a solid reference that I can see appreciating as a resource as I update my training bibliography."--Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society This landmark reference covers all aspects of pediatric neuropsychology from a research-based perspective, while presenting an applied focus with practical suggestions and guidelines for clinical practice. Useful both as a training manual for graduate students and as a comprehensive reference for experienced practitioners, it is an essential resource for those dealing with a pediatric population. This handbook provides an extensive overview of the most common medical conditions that neuropsychologists encounter while dealing with pediatric populations. It also discusses school-based issues such as special education law, consulting with school staff, and reintegrating children back into mainstream schools. It contains over 100 well-respected authors who are leading researchers in their respective fields. Additionally, each of the 95 chapters includes an up-to-date review of available research, resulting in the most comprehensive text on pediatric neuropsychology available in a single volume. Key Features: Provides thorough information on understanding functional neuroanatomy and development, and on using functional neuroimaging Highlights clinical practice issues, such as legal and ethical decision-making, dealing with child abuse and neglect, and working with school staff Describes a variety of professional issues that neuropsychologists must confront during their daily practice, such as ethics, multiculturalism, child abuse, forensics, and psychopharmacology