Sunset Song

Sunset Song

Faced with a choice between a harsh farming life and the world of books and learning, Chris Guthrie chooses to remain in her rural community, bound by her intense love of the land. But everything changes with the arrival of the First World War and Chris finds her land altered beyond recognition. In lyrical prose, Sunset Song evokes village life in the early twentieth century and offers a powerful portrait of a land and people in turmoil. This stunning new edition of one of the most cherished Scottish novels of the twentieth century includes a specially commissioned introduction by Nicola Sturgeon, in which she writes with heartfelt passion of her love for what she regards as 'one of the finest literary accomplishments Scotland has ever known . . . In no small way, I owe my love of literature to Sunset Song'.

Grey Granite

Grey Granite

Introduced by Tom Crawford. Chris Guthrie and her son, Ewan, have come to the industrial town of Duncairn, where life is as hard as the granite of the buildings all around them. These are the Depression years of the 1930s, and Chris is far from the fields of her youth in Sunset Song. In a society of factory owners, shopkeepers, policemen, petty clerks and industrial labourers, ‘Chris Caledonia’ must make her living as bets she can by working in Ma Cleghorn’s boarding house. Ewan finds employment in a steel foundry and tries to lead a peaceful strike against the manufacture of armaments. In the face of violence and police brutality, his socialist idealism is forged into something harder and fiercer as he becomes a communist activist ready to sacrifice himself, his girlfriend and even the truth itself, for the cause. Grey Granite is the last and grimmest volume of the Scots Quair trilogy. Chris Guthrie is one of the great characters in Scottish Literature and no reader of Sunset Song and Cloud Howe should miss this last rich chapter in her tale.

Aestheticism & Modernism

Debating Twentieth-century Literature 1900-1960

Aestheticism & Modernism

Textbook introduction to key debates from the early twentieth century to modernisms emerging between First and Second World Wars. Examines in detail texts by Chekhov, Mansfield, Gibbon, Eliot, Woolf, Brecht and Okigbo.

Cloud Howe

Cloud Howe

Cloud Howe' is Lewis Grassic Gibbon's second novel in the 'A Scots Quair' trilogy. Cloud Howe continues the story of Chris Guthrie who we found out in the first instalment 'Sunset Song' is a young woman growing up in a farming family on the Estate of Kinraddie in "The Mearns" in the north east of Scotland. Life is hard, and her family is dysfunctional. She marries a farmer, Ewan Tavendale, who dies in the First World War. This volume follows the story of Chris Guthrie as she marries for a second time to a church of Scotland minister.

A Scots Quair

A Scots Quair

These charming adventures of the 19th century French brigadier by the creator of Sherlock Holms are “unjustly forgotten tales by a great master” (Michael Chabon). Though Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is best known for his immortal character Sherlock Holmes, his tales of comic adventure featuring Brigadier Etienne Gerard, a French cavalry officer in the tine of the Napoleonic Wars, were equally beloved in their day. An old man who has retired in Paris, Gerard now recounts his escapades of younger days. In Napoleon’s service, he fights battles, breaks hearts, and confounds the English all across Europe. This volume collects all of Doyle’s Brigadier Gerard stories, originally published in The Strand Magazine between 1894 and 1903. In The Complete Brigadier Gerard Stories “you will find adventure, action, romance, love and self-sacrifice, hair's-breadth escape and reckless courage, gallantry, panache and a droll, backhand humor that rivals that of P.G. Wodehouse. You will also find yourself, even more than with the celebrated stories of Holmes and Watson, in the hands of an indisputable artist. For more than any other adventure stories I know, these stories have a power to move the reader... unjustly forgotten tales by a great master" (Michael Chabon for NPR's You Must Read This). "The Brigadier Gerard stories display all the narrative gusto of Doyle's more famous Sherlock Holmes, together with an irresistible warmth and humor."—Philip Pullman

Scottish Skalds and Sagamen

Old Norse Influence on Modern Scottish Literature

Scottish Skalds and Sagamen

Scottish Skalds and Sagamen explores a previously neglected but important aspect of Scotland's literary history: the influence of Viking culture on modern Scottish literature. The book illustrates, firstly, how the Viking invasions and settlements have made a lasting impact on the history, languages and cultures of Scotland and how, from the very beginning, Scotsmen made a distinct and important contribution to the dissemination of Old Norse culture in Britain and played a significant role in the creation of the notion of a Norse ethos. Secondly, and more importantly, the book illustrates in detail how a consciousness of this Norse heritage has influenced nine major Scottish writers of this century: Hugh MacDiarmid, Lewis Grassie Gibbon, Neil Gunn, John Buchan, Naomi Mitchison, David Lindsay, Eric Linklater, Edwin Muir and George Mackay Brown, throwing new light on aspects of Scottish identity and literary trends, especially in the period of the Scottish Renaissance 1920-50. Scottish Skalds and Sagamen provides a new and stimulating contribution to the ongoing debate on the nature and sources of modern Scottish identity and Scottish literature.

British Book News

British Book News

Includes no. 53a: British wartime books for young people.

Smeddum

A Lewis Grassic Gibbon Anthology

Smeddum

Edited and introduced by Valentina Bold. This selection of Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s writing brings together old favourites and new material for the first time. There are all his lively contributions to Scottish Scene (co-written by Hugh MacDiarmid) including the unforgettable lilt and flow of his short stories ‘Smeddum’, ‘Clay’, ‘Greendenn’, ‘Sim’ and ‘Forsaken’. The anthology ends with the full text of his last novel, The Speak of the Mearns, unpublished in his lifetime. Valentina Bold has also included a collection of poems, ‘Songs of Limbo’, taken from typescripts in the National Library of Scotland, and a selection of Grassic Gibbon’s articles and short fiction, with work done for The Cornhill Magazine along with book reviews and essays on Diffusionism, ancient American civilization and selected studies from his book on the lives of explorers, Nine Against the Unknown. A Lewis Grassic Gibbon Anthology provides an indispensable supplement to Canongate’s edition of A Scots Quair, and it also offers further insight into the wide-ranging interests and the lyrical, historical and political writing of the greatest and best-loved Scottish novelist of the early twentieth century. ‘It would be impossible to over-estimate Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s importance . . . [his work] permeates the Scottish literary consciousness and colours all subsequent writing of its kind.’ David Kerr Cameron ‘Gibbon’s style is one of the great achievements of [A Scots Quair] and should be seen in relation to Scottish forerunners like John Galt as well as in the context of modern innovators such as James Joyce, Gertrude Stein and William Faulkner.’ Tom Crawford

Scottish Literature

A New History from 1299 to 1999

Scottish Literature