Structural Factors in Turkic Language Contacts

Structural Factors in Turkic Language Contacts

Turkic languages present particularly rich sources of data for the study of language contact, given the number and diversity of languages with which they have been in contact. Many common, false generalisations are laid bare and the methodology used in evaluating particular instances of language contact can also be used with profit by students of languages other than the Turkic.

Turkic Languages in Contact

Turkic Languages in Contact

The volume contains contributions on contact-induced language change in situations in which one of the languages is a Turkic one. Most papers deal with cases of long-standing language contact. The geographic areas covered include the Balkans (Macedonian Turkish, Gagauz), Western Europe (Turkish-German, Turkish-Dutch contacts), Central Europe (Karaim), Turkey (Turkish-Kurdish, Turkish-Greek contacts, Old Ottoman Turkish), Iran (Turkic-Iranian contacts) and Siberia (Yakut-Tungusic contacts). The contributions focus on various phenomena of code interaction and on various types of structural changes in different contact settings. Several authors employ the Code Copying Model, which is presented in some detail in one of the articles.

The Handbook of Language Contact

The Handbook of Language Contact

The Handbook of Language Contact offers systematic coverageof the major issues in this field – ranging from the value ofcontact explanations in linguistics, to the impact of immigration,to dialectology – combining new research from a team ofglobally renowned scholars, with case studies of numerouslanguages. An authoritative reference work exploring the major issues inthe field of language contact: the study of how language changeswhen speakers of distinct speech varieties interact Brings together 40 specially-commissioned essays by aninternational team of scholars Examines language contact in societies which have significantimmigration populations, and includes a fascinating cross-sectionof case studies drawing on languages across the world Accessibly structured into sections exploring the place ofcontact studies within linguistics as a whole; the value of contactstudies for research into language change; and language contact inthe context of work on language and society Explores a broad range of topics, making it an excellentresource for both faculty and students across a variety of fieldswithin linguistics

Transeurasian Verbal Morphology in a Comparative Perspective

Genealogy, Contact, Chance

Transeurasian Verbal Morphology in a Comparative Perspective

The term Transeurasian refers to a large group of geographically adjacent languages stretching from the Pacific in the East to the Mediterranean in the West. They share a significant amount of linguistic properties and include five linguistic families: Japanese, Korean, Tungusic, Mongolic and Turkic. There is disagreement among scholars on the question whether these languages are genealogically related in the sense of an "Altaic" family. Many linguists, however, seem to agree on at least one point, namely that investigations into the striking correspondences in the domain of verbal morphology could substantially help unravelling the question. The present volume brings together prominent specialists in the field who explore potentially shared features of verbal morphology among the Transeurasian languages and search for the best way to explain them. Important issues dealt with include the following: How useful is verbal morphology really in establishing genealogical relations among languages? Is there concrete evidence for cognate verbal morphology across the Transeurasian languages? Is it possible to draw wider connections with Indo-European and Uralic? How to distinguish between genealogical retention and copying of verbal morphology? In which ways can typological similarities be significant in this context?

Die ural-altaischen Völker

Identität im Wandel zwischen Tradition und Moderne : Vorträge des Symposiums der Societas Uralo-Altaica vom 13. bis 15. Oktober 2002

Die ural-altaischen Völker

K. Sagaster, 50 Jahre Societas Uralo-Altaica; K. Agyagasi, Die historische Wandlung der ethnischen Struktur des Wolgagebiets; A. Birtalan, Traditionelle mongolische Religionen im Wandel; I. Futaky, Die Csango-Ungarn in der Moldau nach dem Zusammenbruch des Ceausescu-Regimes; L. Honti, Uber eine mogliche Zwischenstufe in der Geschichte der russisch-uralischen Sprachkontakte; L. Johanson, Erbe und Identitat bei den Turken und ihren Nachbarn; L.-G. Larsson, Eigene Kulturgeschichte und finnisch-ugrisches Bewusstsein; J.P. Laut, Imagologie auf Turkeiturkisch; K. Rohrborn, Zur Frage einer Lingua franca fur die Turkvolker in der Gegenwart; A. Rona-Tas, Language, ethnos and history. The case of the Volga Bulghars and their posterity in the Volga region; S. Saarinen, Sprachgesetze und Neologismenbildung bei den wolgaischen und permischen Volkern; D. Usmanova, Die muslimische religiose Presse im Wolga-Ural-Gebiet im ersten Drittel des 20. Jahrhunderts; H. Werner, Die Keten - ein stark bedrohtes jenissejisches Volk; A. Widmer, Meister der Integration in der Agonie: die Obugrier; E. Winkler, Finnougrier und Islam

Language Contact in South Central Siberia

Language Contact in South Central Siberia

The volume offers a description of the history and linguistic consequences of Russian-Turkic contacts in two adjacent republics in the Altai-Sayan region of south central Siberia, viz. Khakasia and Tuva. First an overview of Russian-Turkic contacts is offered. Next follows a lengthy outline of the standardized form of Khakas to serve as a basis of comparison for the data discussed in subsequent chapters. The complex linguistic history of Abakan, the capital of Khakasia is addressed, in particular what indigenous sources have contributed to the modern urban vernacular. This is in large part the result of intense mixing and amalgamation of the diverse dialects of Khakas. Further the role that Russian has played in shaping the modern speech variety attested in the capital city is examined in detail. Finally, Abakan Khakas data is compared with that of Kyzyl Tuvan, spoken in the capital city of the significantly less Russianized Republic of Tuva. The volume also includes a brief general discussion of the dynamics of language contact and structural change in languages under conditions of contact.

Grammars in Contact

A Cross-Linguistic Typology

Grammars in Contact

Examining the ways in which linguistic traits may change in a contact situation, this book contains an encyclopaedic introduction, which sets out a theory of contact-induced change, and chapters which analyse the effects of language contact on grammatical systems in a variety of languages.

Aspects of Language Contact

New Theoretical, Methodological and Empirical Findings with Special Focus on Romancisation Processes

Aspects of Language Contact

This edited volume brings together fourteen original contributions to the on-going debate about what is possible in contact-induced language change. The authors present a number of new vistas on language contact which represent new developments in the field. In the first part of the volume, the focus is on methodology and theory. Thomas Stolz defines the study of Romancisation processes as a very promising laboratory for language-contact oriented research and theoretical work based thereon. The reader is informed about the large scale projects on loanword typology in the contribution by Martin Haspelmath and on contact-induced grammatical change conducted by Jeanette Sakel and Yaron Matras. Christel Stolz reviews processes of gender-assignment to loan nouns in German and German-based varieties. The typology of loan verbs is the topic of the contribution by Søren Wichmann and Jan Wohlgemuth. In the articles by Wolfgang Wildgen and Klaus Zimmermann, two radically new approaches to the theory of language contact are put forward: a dynamic model and a constructivism-based theory, respectively. The second part of the volume is dedicated to more empirically oriented studies which look into language-contact constellations with a Romance donor language and a non-European recipient language. Spanish-Amerindian (Guaraní, Otomí, Quichua) contacts are investigated in the comparative study by Dik Bakker, Jorge Gómez-Rendón and Ewald Hekking. Peter Bakker and Robert A. Papen discuss the influence exerted by French on the indigenous languages ofCanada. The extent of the Portuguese impact on the Amazonian language Kulina is studied by Stefan Dienst. John Holm looks at the validity of the hypothesis that bound morphology normally falls victim to Creolization processes and draws his evidence mainly from Portuguese-based Creoles. ForAustronesia, borrowings and calques from French still are an understudied phenomenon. Claire Moyse-Faurie's contribution to this topic is thus a pioneer's work. Similarly, Françoise Rose and Odile Renault-Lescure provide us with fresh data on language contact inFrench Guiana. The final article of this collection by Mauro Tosco demonstrates that the Italianization of languages of the former Italian colonies inEast Africa is only weak. This volume provides the reader with new insights on all levels of language-contact related studies. The volume addresses especially a readership that has a strong interest in language contact in general and its repercussions on the phonology, grammar and lexicon of the recipient languages. Experts of Romance language contact, and specialists of Amerindian languages, Afro-Asiatic languages, Austronesian languages and Pidgins and Creoles will find the volume highly valuable.