The Shoah in Ukraine

History, Testimony, Memorialization

The Shoah in Ukraine

On the eve of the Nazi invasion of the USSR in 1941, Ukraine was home to the largest Jewish community in Europe. Between 1941 and 1944, some 1.4 million Jews were killed there, and one of the most important centers of Jewish life was destroyed. Yet, little is known about this chapter of Holocaust history. Drawing on archival sources from the former Soviet Union and bringing together researchers from Ukraine, Germany, Great Britain, the Netherlands, and the United States, The Shoah in Ukraine sheds light on the critical themes of perpetration, collaboration, Jewish-Ukrainian relations, testimony, rescue, and Holocaust remembrance in Ukraine. Contributors are Andrej Angrick, Omer Bartov, Karel C. Berkhoff, Ray Brandon, Martin Dean, Dennis Deletant, Frank Golczewski, Alexander Kruglov, Wendy Lower, Dieter Pohl, and Timothy Snyder.

Regimes of Twentieth-Century Germany

From Historical Consciousness to Political Action

Regimes of Twentieth-Century Germany

Regimes of Twentieth-Century Germany is a concise theory of and empirical study on action consciousness as an integral dimension of historical consciousness with specific emphasis on National Socialist Germany and the German Democratic Republic.

Holocaust

Origins, Implementation, Aftermath

Holocaust

Holocaust: Origins, Implementation, Aftermath presents a critical and important study of the Holocaust. Complete with an introduction that summarizes the state of the field, this book contains major reinterpretations by leading Holocaust authors along with key texts on testimony, memory, and justice after the cataastrophe.

Post-Holocaust Religious Education for German Women

Post-Holocaust Religious Education for German Women

Post-Holocaust Religious Education focuses on experiences of second- and third generation non-Jewish German women, highlighting their dual roles as both descendants of a perpetrator community and victims of a patriarchal system. How can they learn to face this perpetrator heritage and integrate it into their identity as women, as Germans, and as Christians? Drawing from a review of literature and empirical field studies, the book concludes by offering a relational approach to religious education; an approach towards a more constructive interaction between Jewish and Christian communities.

Karl Barth: Post-Holocaust Theologian?

Karl Barth: Post-Holocaust Theologian?

Karl Barth's attitude toward the Jews, despite some admittedly unfortunate elements, still has much to commend it and the essays in this volume discuss this matter. The contributors examine numerous topics: the extent to which Barth compares favorably with recent post-Holocaust theologies, Barth's position on the Jews during the Third Reich, his critique of the German-Christian Völkish church on ethical grounds. The discussion tackles Barth dialectical “Yes” to Israel's christological “No”, it unpacks his ground-breaking exegesis of Rom. 9-11; as well as examines Barth's rejection of the 1933 Aryan Law that formed the basis for excluding baptized Jews from Christian communities during the Third Reich. The essays also examine Barth's later worries about Nostra Aetate, Vatican II's landmark “Declaration on the Relation of the Church to Non-christian Religions”. This is followed by an in-depth explanation how Barth's theology differentiated the question of religious pluralism from church's relationship with Judaism. This inspiring volume concludes by taking up the neglected question of Barth's place in modern European history.

An Unjust God?

A Christian Theology of Israel in light of Romans 9–11

An Unjust God?

First-timeTranslation in English - - - The relationship between Christians and Jews has often been very tense, with misunderstandings of Paul's teachings contributing to the problem. Jacques Ellul's careful exegesis of Romans 9-11 demonstrates how God has not rejected Israel. The title is taken from the verse, Is there some injustice in God? The answer is a clear no. God's election simply expanded outward beyond Israel to reach all peoples of the earth. In the end, there will be a reconciliation of Jews and Christians within God's plan of salvation. Written in 1991, three years before Ellul died, An Unjust God? brings a new understanding to a section of Scripture known for its conventional and limited interpretations. One significant feature of the book is Ellul's personal experience of the suffering of Jews under the Nazi regime; and this has direct bearing for the way he links the sufferings of Israel with the sufferings of Jesus. Ellul is then bold enough to say that a major reason why the Jewish people have not accepted Jesus as Messiah is because the Christian Church has not done well to emulate the Jewish Savior of the world.

Shadows of the Shoah

Jewish identity and belonging

Shadows of the Shoah

"How can we make sense of being born and growing up in the shadows of the Shoah without being able to speak about the unspeakable terror that killed so many in our families? As the second generation we were rarely to hear stories of love and loss or to participate in the mourning of so many who had been brutally murdered. Rather we were to grow up ls"normallyrs", and to learn to turn our backs on the past as we struggled towards future identities while imagining ourselves ls"like everyone elsers". Fearful of difference we were often ambivalent about Jewish identities that could threaten a sense of ls"Englishnessrs"." Exploring the painful dynamics of personal identity and belonging, Victor Jeleniewski Seidler shares the difficulties of memory. How is it possible ever really to belong and feel safe and yet remember what happened to Jewish families in Poland? How can one remember without feeling overwhelmed by the terror? Crossing boundaries in a journey to Poland enabled the author to rethink a relationship between Judaism and modernity, as well as to reflect on the painful histories between Poles and Jews. Questions about memory, identity and belonging touch the lives of many people who live in the shadows of historical trauma. Learning to think in new ways about the Shoah as a defining crisis within modernity, Seidler also helps us imagine an ethics for a postmodern time.