Spend the Day in Ancient Egypt

Projects and Activities That Bring the Past to Life

Spend the Day in Ancient Egypt

Text, projects, and activities introduce daily life in ancient Egypt from the viewpoint of a fictional family celebrating a festival day in honor of one of their gods.

Spend the day in ancient Rome

projects and activities that bring the past to life

Spend the day in ancient Rome

While they read about a typical Roman family of A.D. 125 who are celebrating the Roman Games, children can participate in fun, hands-on projects such as draping a toga, making a gladiator's shield, and writing on a Roman scroll. Original.

24 Hours in Ancient Egypt

A Day in the Life of the People Who Lived There

24 Hours in Ancient Egypt

Spend 24 hours with the ancient Egyptians. Ancient Egypt wasn't all pyramids, sphinxes and gold sarcophagi. For your average Egyptian, life was tough, and work was hard, conducted under the burning gaze of the sun god Ra. During the course of a day in the ancient city of Thebes (modern-day Luxor), Egypt's religious capital, we meet 24 Egyptians from all strata of society - from the king to the bread-maker, the priestess to the fisherman, the soldier to the midwife - and get to know what the real Egypt was like by spending an hour in their company. We encounter a different one of these characters - all from different walks of life - every hour and every chapter, and through their eyes see what an average day in ancient Egypt was really like.

Everyday Life in Ancient Egypt

Everyday Life in Ancient Egypt

Remarkably accurate picture of Egyptian life from the end of the third millenium BC to the Greek occupation in 330 BC. "A handy reference tool." — Horn Book. 120 illustrations.

Egypt in the Age of the Pyramids

Egypt in the Age of the Pyramids

Andreu describes the Egyptians as they spend a day in the marshes with family and friends. They glide on light skiffs through the papyrus plants, stopping occasionally to marvel at the marsh creatures: frogs, butterflies, kingfishers, ibises, herons, lapwings, weasels, and mongooses. Because the marshes also shelter crocodiles and hippopotamuses, the day is not without its perils.

Ancient Egyptian Magical Texts

Ancient Egyptian Magical Texts

Now back in print after 25 years: A small but unusually exhaustive collection of magical texts from some of the most important ancient Egyptian manuals and stelae, translated and organized by the renowned Dutch Egyptologist J.F. Borghouts.

Living in Ancient Egypt

Living in Ancient Egypt

Presents essays and primary and secondary documents that examine aspects of life in ancient Egypt, including home life, the role of women, education, leisure activities, religious beliefs, and the importance of the pyramids.

Sexual Life Ancient Egypt Hb

Sexual Life Ancient Egypt Hb

First published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Queen of Science

Personal Recollections of Mary Somerville

Queen of Science

The complete memoirs of the 19th century scientist, public intellectual, and first female member of the Royal Astronomical Society. Born in Jedburgh in 1780, Mary Fairfax was the daughter of a captain in Lord Nelson’s navy. In common with most girls of her time and station, she received an education that prized gentility over ability. Nevertheless, she taught herself algebra in secret, and made her reputation in celestial mechanics with her 1831 translation of Laplace’s Mécanique céleste as The Mechanism of the Heavens. A brilliant polymath with interests in art, literature and nature, Somerville’s memoirs give a fascinating picture of her life and times from childhood in Burntisland to international recognition and retirement in Naples. She recounts memories of comets and eclipses, high society in London and Paris, Charles Babbage and his calculating engine, encounters with Sir Walter Scott and Fenimore Cooper, the Risorgimento in Italy and the eruption of Vesuvius. Selected by her daughter and first published in 1973, these are the memoirs of a remarkable woman who became one of the nineteenth century’s most accomplished mathematicians and scientists. Oxford’s Somerville College was named after her, and the present volume, re-edited by Dorothy McMillan, draws on manuscripts owned by the college, offering the first unexpurgated edition of these revelatory writings.