The Man Who Stopped the Trains to Auschwitz

George Mantello, El Salvador, and Switzerland’s Finest Hour

The Man Who Stopped the Trains to Auschwitz

George Mantello, First Secretary of the El Salvador Consulate in Geneva from 1942 to 1945, defied strict censorship to launch a press campaign against the daily deportation of 12,000 Hungarian Jews to Auschwitz. This is the true story of one man’s efforts to bring horrific news of the Nazi genocide to the Swiss public and to the rest of the world. Armed with this information, prominent Swiss church leaders and theologians condemned the unfolding Holocaust from their pulpits, spurring large public demonstrations. In 400 articles appearing in 120 newspapers, Mantello reached opinion makers throughout the world community. International pressure halted the Hungarian deportations, and Mantello distributed thousands of Salvadoran citizenship papers to Jews in Nazi-occupied territories. In addition to Mantello’s role, Kranzler shows how Swiss theologians such as karl barth and paul Vogt mobilized thousands of Christians against the Germans and against the indifference of the Swiss government and the International Red Cross. This fresh look at the intersection of politics and religion also allows for a new assessment of Swiss complicity in the crimes of the Nazi Third Reich.

Five Hundred Years to Auschwitz

A Family Odyssey from the Inquisition to the Present

Five Hundred Years to Auschwitz


Ethics After Auschwitz?

Primo Levi's and Elie Wiesel's Response

Ethics After Auschwitz?

Ethics after Auschwitz? Primo Levi's and Elie Wiesel's Response demonstrates how, after their horrific experiences in Auschwitz, both Primo Levi and Elie Wiesel could have deservedly expressed rage and bitterness for the rest of their lives. Housed in the same barracks in the depths of hell, a dark reality surpassing Dante's vivid images portrayed in The Inferno, they chose to speak, write, and work for a better world, never allowing the memory of those who did not survive to fade. Why and how did they make this choice? What influenced their values before Auschwitz and their moral decision making after it? What can others who have suffered less devastating traumas learn from them? «The quest is in the question», Wiesel often tells his students. This book is a quest for hope and goodness emerging from the Shoah's deepest «night».

Holocaust Landscapes

Holocaust Landscapes

The theme of Tim Cole's Holocaust Landscapes concerns the geography of the Holocaust; the Holocaust as a place-making event for both perpetrators and victims. Through concepts such as distance and proximity, Professor Cole tells the story of the Holocaust through a number of landscapes where genocide was implemented, experienced and evaded and which have subsequently been forgotten in the post-war world. Drawing on particular survivors' narratives, Holocaust Landscapes moves between a series of ordinary and extraordinary places and the people who inhabited them throughout the years of the Second World War. Starting in Germany in the late 1930s, the book shifts chronologically and geographically westwards but ends up in Germany in the final chaotic months of the war. These landscapes range from the most iconic (synagogue, ghetto, railroad, camp, attic) to less well known sites (forest, sea and mountain, river, road, displaced persons camp). Holocaust Landscapes provides a new perspective surrounding the shifting geographies and histories of this continent-wide event.

The Female Face of God in Auschwitz

A Jewish Feminist Theology of the Holocaust

The Female Face of God in Auschwitz

This is the first full-length feminist dialogue with Holocaust theory, theology and social history. It builds on the published memoirs of four women held at Auschwitz.

The Road to Emmaus

Poems

The Road to Emmaus

Longlisted for the National Book Award A moving, subtle sequence of narrative poems, from a sharp new poetic voice Two strangers walk toward Emmaus. Christ has just been crucified, and they are heartbroken—until a third man joins them on the road and comforts them. Once they reach Emmaus and break bread, the pair realizes they have been walking with Christ himself. But in the moment they recognize him, he disappears. Spencer Reece draws on this tender story in his mesmerizing collection—one that fearlessly confronts love and its loss, despair and its consolation, and faith in all of its various guises. Reece's central figure in The Road to Emmaus is a middle-aged man who becomes a priest in the Episcopal Church; these poems follow him to New York City, to Honduras, to a hospital where he works as a chaplain, to a prison, to an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting. With language of simple, lyrical beauty that gradually accrues weight and momentum, Reece spins compelling dramas out of small moments: the speaker, living among a group of orphans, wondering "Was it true, what they said, that a priest is a house lit up?"; two men finding each other at a Coming Out Group; a man trying to become visible after a life that had depended on not being seen. A yearning for connection, an ache of loneliness, and the instant of love disappearing before our eyes haunt this long-awaited second collection from Spencer Reece.

From Auschwitz to Ithaca

The Transnational Journey of Jack Geltwert

From Auschwitz to Ithaca

The ways in which Holocaust survivors' lives have been reconfigured in a post-Holocaust world, as displaced persons, as refugees and transnational subjects, most of them in diasporic settings far from their native homes, then, is what is intrinsically different. This focus on a reconfigured post-Holocaust life guides Diane Wolf's interview and understanding of Jake Geldwert's narrative and gives it a substantially different spin from conventional Holocaust testimonials."--BOOK JACKET.

The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz

The Extraordinary True Story

The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz

THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER THE MAN WHO BROKE INTO AUSCHWITZ is the extraordinary true story of a British soldier who marched willingly into Buna-Monowitz, the concentration camp known as Auschwitz III. In the summer of 1944, Denis Avey was being held in a POW labour camp, E715, near Auschwitz III. He had heard of the brutality meted out to the prisoners there and he was determined to witness what he could. He hatched a plan to swap places with a Jewish inmate and smuggled himself into his sector of the camp. He spent the night there on two occasions and experienced at first-hand the cruelty of a place where slave workers, had been sentenced to death through labour. Astonishingly, he survived to witness the aftermath of the Death March where thousands of prisoners were murdered by the Nazis as the Soviet Army advanced. After his own long trek right across central Europe he was repatriated to Britain. For decades he couldn't bring himself to revisit the past, but now Denis Avey feels able to tell the full story - a tale as gripping as it is moving - which offers us a unique insight into the mind of an ordinary man whose moral and physical courage are almost beyond belief.

Breaking the Silence

Voices of the British Children of Refugees from Nazism

Breaking the Silence

An in-depth analysis of the memories and experiences of the British second generation of refugees from Nazism before the Holocaust. This oral history project investigates the impact of their parents’ trauma, dislocation and pattern of silence on ordinary members of this second generation in this unique geographical context.