Shakespeare in Fluff

Shakespeare in Fluff

O Romeo, Romeo! Where fur art though Romeo? William Shakespeare has given us so many of the most iconic moments in literary history. From the tortured existential genius of Hamlet's "To be or not to be", or the complex violence of Macbeth's "Is this a dagger I see before me" and the heart-breaking romance of Romeo and Juliet's balcony scene, millions of us have been moved to laughter and tears by his timeless poetry. Now, finally, we're able to experience these moments through the medium of small furry animals.

Loving Lord Ash

Loving Lord Ash

A Little Misunderstanding. . . Kit, the Marquis of Ashton, is in a sticky wicket. He married young and for love—how naïve. He discovered his mistake the very day of his wedding, but he is saddled now with a wife he's reluctant to trust. And however much evidence he gathers against faithless Jess, he can't seem to prove her guilt to the final judge—his foolish heart. Jessica knows she's bobbled her marriage, however innocently. A fairytale wedding makes no difference if she hasn't got the marquis charmed to show for it. Well, she's had enough of accidental encounters with naked gentlemen and near misses explaining things to her husband. It's time to buck up and go win her man back—even if she has to fight very dirty indeed. "Great fun." —Publishers Weekly Praise for the Novels of Sally MacKenzie "Naked, noble and irresistible!" —Eloisa James "The romance equivalent of chocolate cake. . .every page is an irresistible delight!" —Lisa Kleypas "A perfect night's read." —RT Book Reviews

Shakespeare’s Fans

Adapting the Bard in the Age of Media Fandom

Shakespeare’s Fans

This book examines Shakespearean adaptations through the critical lens of fan studies and asks what it means to be a fan of Shakespeare in the context of contemporary media fandom. Although Shakespeare studies and fan studies have remained largely separate from one another for the past thirty years, this book establishes a sustained dialogue between the two fields. In the process, it reveals and seeks to overcome the problematic assumptions about the history of fan cultures, Shakespeare’s place in that history, and how fan works are defined. While fandom is normally perceived as a recent phenomenon focused primarily on science fiction and fantasy, this book traces fans’ practices back to the eighteenth century, particularly David Garrick’s Shakespeare Jubilee in 1769. Shakespeare’s Fans connects historical and scholarly debates over who owns Shakespeare and what constitutes an appropriate adaptation of his work to online fan fiction and commercially available fan works.

Shakespeare's Stationers

Studies in Cultural Bibliography

Shakespeare's Stationers

Recent studies in early modern cultural bibliography have put forth a radically new Shakespeare—a man of keen literary ambition who wrote for page as well as stage. His work thus comes to be viewed as textual property and a material object not only seen theatrically but also bought, read, collected, annotated, copied, and otherwise passed through human hands. This Shakespeare was invented in large part by the stationers—publishers, printers, and booksellers—who produced and distributed his texts in the form of books. Yet Shakespeare's stationers have not received sustained critical attention. Edited by Marta Straznicky, Shakespeare's Stationers: Studies in Cultural Bibliography shifts Shakespearean textual scholarship toward a new focus on the earliest publishers and booksellers of Shakespeare's texts. This seminal collection is the first to explore the multiple and intersecting forms of agency exercised by Shakespeare's stationers in the design, production, marketing, and dissemination of his printed works. Nine critical studies examine the ways in which commerce intersected with culture and how individual stationers engaged in a range of cultural functions and political movements through their business practices. Two appendices, cataloguing the imprints of Shakespeare's texts to 1640 and providing forty additional stationer profiles, extend the volume's reach well beyond the case studies, offering a foundation for further research.

Passing Time in the Loo

Shakespeare

Passing Time in the Loo

Shakespeare's plays. . . . Stuffy, convoluted, long-winded? Sure, for some out there - especially the arrogant, ivory-tower intellect who can't utter a single word that can be understood by the average Romeo, who refuses to put out a book that weighs less than Lear's sword, and who, in the manner of a Hamlet, insists on dissecting, analyzing, scrutinizing and, worse yet, squabbling over every jot and tittle the Bard ever wrote. Hence, the purpose of this book - to quickly and painlessly acquaint readers and so-called "nonreaders" alike with Shakespeare, his world, his words, and his most noteworthy works. In this day and age, who has the time or patience to pore over long, drawn-out books? Enter Scarab, its aim being to provide a non-stuffy, non-convoluted, non-long-winded solution, one that lets you become a Shakespeare connoisseur in a fraction of the time it might take your stiflingly snobbish bookworm brother-in-law. Imagine, in 15 minutes flat, being able to be clued in on a play's key plots, characters and commentaries. And suddenly, you've been appointed the office genius! These condensed, crash-course, water-cooler renderings offer up the highlights of Shakespeare's masterpieces, without all the "fluff." A "Shakespeare at a Glance" chapter up front includes a brief biography, excerpts from some of his greatest poems, samplings of his rapier wit and levelheaded wisdom, and a cruelly fun section titled "Shakespearean Name-Calling: The Art of Archaic Insults," which unlocks a door into the playwright's psyche by letting you unleash your own playfully biting barbs.

A History of Shakespeare on Screen

A Century of Film and Television

A History of Shakespeare on Screen

This edition of A History of Shakespeare on Screen updates the chronology to 2003, with a new chapter on recent films.

Shakespeare's Secret

Shakespeare's Secret

Hero changed into a T-shirt, grabbed a book, and padded barefoot into her sister's room. The large windows overlooked the backyard. She could see the moonlight streaming over the trees and bushes, making long, crazy shadows across the grass. Was there a diamond hidden out there somewhere? She looked at Beatrice, already settled under the covers. She wanted to tell her about the Murphys, but at the same time, she didn't. She wanted to keep the secret. To have something that belonged only to her. A missing diamond, a mysterious neighbor, a link to Shakespeare-can Hero uncover the connections? When Hero starts sixth grade at a new school, she's less concerned about the literary origins of her Shakespearean name than about the teasing she's sure to suffer because of it. So she has the same name as a girl in a book by a dusty old author. Hero is simply not interested in the connections. But that's just the thing; suddenly connections are cropping up all over, and odd characters and uncertain pasts are exactly what do fascinate Hero. There's a mysterious diamond hidden in her new house, a curious woman next door who seems to know an awful lot about it, and then, well, then there's Shakespeare. Not to mention Danny Cordova, only the most popular boy in school. Is it all in keeping with her namesake's origin-just much ado about nothing? Hero, being Hero, is determined to figure it out. In this fast-paced novel, Elise Broach weaves an intriguing literary mystery full of historical insights and discoveries. A JUNIOR LIBRARY GUILD SELECTION

Shakespeare's Landlord

Shakespeare's Landlord

Lily Bard is a loner. Other than the day-to-day workings of her cleaning and errand-running service, she pays little attention to the town around her. But when her landlord is murdered, Lily is singled out as the prime suspect, and proving her innocence will depend on finding the real killer in quiet, secretive Shakespeare.

What Fool Would Challenge Shakespeare?

Going Toe to Toe with the Champion Sonneteer

What Fool Would Challenge Shakespeare?

By Knowledge Unsullied The way you gut a catfish, trim a sail, Or how a host concocts the perfect martini, What the blazes is a farthingale, The names of all the operas by Puccini, All this escapes mealong with winning at poker, Tiling a bathroom, cheating bees of their honey, Dancing beyond a score of mediocre, Talking sports, or making a pile of money. Equating learning with earning, most are aghast. You worthless dimwit, they say, you must feel dejected. Au contraire! My cluelessness unsurpassed, Such matchless ignorance has got to be respected. A gorge gigantic, gaping, without flaw: Not even the Grand Canyon commands such awe.

The Secret Confessions of Anne Shakespeare

The Secret Confessions of Anne Shakespeare

An inventive and vibrant historical novel about the woman who dared to be the equal of the Bard of Avon. Dramatizing a marriage born of passion and strained by ambition, Arliss Ryan's fascinating historical novel chronicles a love affair for the ages, and the story of a woman who dares to fulfill her own surprising destiny. Anne Hathaway is weighing her prospects for marriage when a dalliance with young Will Shakespeare, the poetry-writing son of a rural glove- maker, leaves her pregnant and wed. When Will joins a traveling acting troupe and moves to London, Anne leaves their children in his parents' care and boldly follows him. Taking up a new identity at Will's side, Anne supports his career as a struggling actor by sewing costumes and transcribing manuscripts in the rough-and-tumble world of London's theatres. As Will finds his true calling in writing, Anne's own literary skills begin to flower, leading to a secret collaboration that makes Will the foremost playwright in Elizabethan England.