The Collected Works Of Ernest Hemingway

Nine-Book Bundle

The Collected Works Of Ernest Hemingway

The Collected Works of Ernest Hemingway brings together novels of the acclaimed American author. From early promise to literary maturity, the novels of Ernest Hemingway are the work of a skilled storyteller that continue to resonate with modern readers. This special ebook edition includes: The Torrents of Spring, The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, To Have and Have Not, For Whom the Bell Tolls, Across the River and Into the Trees, The Old Man and the Sea, Islands in the Stream and The Garden of Eden. HarperPerennial Classics brings great works of literature to life in digital format, upholding the highest standards in ebook production and celebrating reading in all its forms. Look for more titles in the HarperPerennial Classics collection to build your digital library.

Ernest Hemingway Selected Letters 1917-1961

Ernest Hemingway Selected Letters 1917-1961

This collection of Hemingway's personal correspondence reveals his multidimensional character, views on contemporaneous literary topics, and irrepressible opinions about friends, work, women, soldiers, politicans, and himself.

By-Line Ernest Hemingway

Selected Articles and Dispatches of Four Decades

By-Line Ernest Hemingway

Spanning the years 1920 to 1956, this priceless collection shows Hemingway's work as a reporter, from correspondent for the Toronto Star to contributor to Esquire, Colliers, and Look. As fledgling reporter, war correspondent, and seasoned journalist, Hemingway provides access to a range of experiences, including vivid eyewitness accounts of the Spanish Civil War and World War II. By-Line: Ernest Hemingway offers a glimpse into the world behind the popular fiction of one of America's greatest writers.

Expatriate American Authors in Paris

Disillusionment with the American Lifestyle as Reflected in Selected Works of Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald

Expatriate American Authors in Paris

Inhaltsangabe:Abstract: Paris has traditionally called to the American heart, beginning with the arrival of Benjamin Franklin in 1776 in an effort to win the support of France for the colonies War of Independence. Franklin would remain in Paris for nine years, returning to Philadelphia in 1785. Then, in the first great period of American literature before 1860, literary pioneers such as Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Nathaniel Hawthorne were all to spend time in the French capital. Henry James, toward the close of the nineteenth century, was the first to create the image of a talented literary artist who was ready to foreswear his citizenship. From his adopted home in England he traveled widely through Italy and France, living in Paris for two years. There he became close friends with another literary expatriate, Edith Wharton, who made Paris her permanent home. Between them they gave the term expatriate a high literary polish at the turn of the century, and their prestige was undeniable. They were the in cosmopolitans, sought out by traveling Americans, commented on in the press, the favored guests of scholars, as well as men and women of affairs. This thesis investigates the mass expatriation of Americans to Paris during the 1920s, and then focuses on selected works by two of the expatriates: Ernest Hemingway s The Sun Also Rises (1926) and F. Scott Fitzgerald s The Great Gatsby (1925). The specific emphasis is on disillusionment with the American lifestyle as reflected in these novels. The two books have been chosen because both are prominent examples of the literary criticism that Americans were directing at their homeland from abroad throughout the twenties. In a first step, necessary historical background regarding the nature of the American lifestyle is provided in chapter two. This information is included in order to facilitate a better understanding of what Hemingway and Fitzgerald were actually disillusioned with. Furthermore, that lifestyle was a primary motivating factor behind the expatriation of many United States citizens. Attention is given to the extraordinary nature of the American migration to Paris in the twenties, as the sheer volume of exiles set it apart from any expatriation movement before or since in American history. Moreover, a vast majority of the participants were writers, artists, or intellectuals, a fact which suggests the United States during [...]

Study Guide to A Farewell to Arms and Other Works by Ernest Hemingway

Study Guide to A Farewell to Arms and Other Works by Ernest Hemingway

A comprehensive study guide offering in-depth explanation, essay, and test prep for selected works by Ernest Hemingway, winner of the 1954 Nobel Prize in Literature. Titles in this study guide include A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, The Old Man and the Sea, and The Sun Also Rises. As an influential figure of twentieth-century fiction, Hemingway’s eloquent prose style had a powerful influence on American and British fiction. Moreover, Hemingway portrayed war as a symbol of society and life, as he evoked themes of honor, courage, pain, destruction, and morality throughout his works. This Bright Notes Study Guide explores the context and history of Hemingway’s classic work, helping students to thoroughly explore the reasons they have stood the literary test of time. Each Bright Notes Study Guide contains: - Introductions to the Author and the Work - Character Summaries - Plot Guides - Section and Chapter Overviews - Test Essay and Study Q&As The Bright Notes Study Guide series offers an in-depth tour of more than 275 classic works of literature, exploring characters, critical commentary, historical background, plots, and themes. This set of study guides encourages readers to dig deeper in their understanding by including essay questions and answers as well as topics for further research.

Expatriate American Authors in Paris - Disillusionment with the American Lifestyle as Reflected in Selected Works of Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald

Expatriate American Authors in Paris - Disillusionment with the American Lifestyle as Reflected in Selected Works of Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald

Master's Thesis from the year 2001 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 1.3 (A), University of Paderborn, 73 entries in the bibliography, language: English, comment: M.A. THESIS in American Literature, abstract: Paris has traditionally called to the American heart, beginning with the arrival of Benjamin Franklin in 1776 in an effort to win the support of France for the colonies' War of Independence. Franklin would remain in Paris for nine years, returning to Philadelphia in 1785. Then, in the first great period of American literature before 1860, literary pioneers such as Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Nathaniel Hawthorne were all to spend time in the French capital. Henry James, toward the close of the nineteenth century, was the first to create the image of a talented literary artist who was ready to foreswear his citizenship. From his adopted home in England he traveled widely through Italy and France, living in Paris for two years. There he became close friends with another literary expatriate, Edith Wharton, who made Paris her permanent home. Between them they gave the term "expatriate" a high literary polish at the turn of the century, and their prestige was undeniable. They were the 'in' cosmopolitans, sought out by traveling Americans, commented on in the press, the favored guests of scholars, as well as men and women of affairs. This thesis investigates the mass expatriation of Americans to Paris during the 1920s, and then focuses on selected works by two of the expatriates: Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises (1926) and F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby (1925). The specific emphasis is on disillusionment with the American lifestyle as reflected in these novels. The two books have been chosen because both are prominent examples of the literary criticism that Americans were directing at their homeland from abroad throughout the twenties.

The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories

The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories

Contains ten of Hemingway's classic stories including "The snows of Kilimanjaro," "A day's wait," "Fathers and sons," "The killers," and "The short happy life of Francis Macomber"

Student Companion to Ernest Hemingway

Student Companion to Ernest Hemingway

Provides background information on the life of Ernest Hemingway and his development as a writer, and includes critical examinations of his major works, his short fiction, and works published posthumously.