Terry Nation

The Man Who Invented the Daleks

Terry Nation

The Daleks are one of the most iconic and fearsome creations in television history. Since their first appearance in 1963, they have simultaneously fascinated and terrified generations of children, their instant success ensuring, and sometimes eclipsing, that of Doctor Who. They sprang from the imagination of Terry Nation, a failed stand-up comic who became one of the most prolific writers for television that Britian ever produced. Survivors, his vision of a post-apocalyptic England, so haunted audiences in the Seventies that the BBC revived it over thirty years on, and Blake’s 7, constantly rumored for return, endures as a cult sci-fi classic. But it is for his genocidal pepperpots that Nation is most often remembered, and on the 50th anniversary of their creation they continue to top the Saturday-night ratings. Yet while the Daleks brought him notoriety and riches, Nation played a much wider role in British broadcasting’s golden age. He wrote for Spike Milligan, Frankie Howerd and an increasingly troubled Tony Hancock, and as one of the key figures behind the adventure series of the Sixties – including The Avengers, The Saint and The Persuaders! – he turned the pulp classics of his boyhood into a major British export. In The Man Who Invented the Daleks, acclaimed cultural historian Alwyn W. Turner, explores the curious and contested origins of Doctor Who's greatest villains, and sheds light on a strange world of ambitious young writers, producers and performers without whom British culture today would look very different.

From Troy to Man

From Troy to Man

Troy Brown resumes his diary. Now he is seventeen and he desperately wants to leave home and start his life as a bachelor. He has just been dumped by his first proper girlfriend and not because he has ‘accidentally’ cheated on her twice during their relationship. She wants to play the field. Most of his friends have moved away from the island and life out of school proves to be quite a challenge for him. Troy is forced to grow up because of his incredible ability to make mistakes. His mistakes as usual are of a sexual nature and the consequences of unprotected sex begin to appear, seemingly out of thin air. Faced with fatherhood and separation from his children, Troy’s attitude to life changes forever. His main concern isn’t football anymore – it is how the hell he is going to be able to be a real father to his children and how many children has he got? Of course his life is full of the other problems associated with day-to-day life. Will he ever find true love? Will he ever find a job that he is truly happy in? Can he solve a murder mystery? Can he avoid being murdered himself? Will he ever be able to be a true father to his children? All of these questions are answered in this book. If you thought that being a fifteen-year old virgin was enough of a rollercoaster ride for Troy - read on. This year and a half of his life may leave you needing to ingest a large dose of motion pills.

Ultimate Regeneration: The Incredible Resurrection of Doctor Who

Ultimate Regeneration: The Incredible Resurrection of Doctor Who

Sourced from the controversial reviews of www.kasterborous.com, this book charts the return of Doctor Who in 2005 with the episode Rose and via regenerations and new companions takes the reader through to the departure of the man who brought the show back, Russell T Davies.

Time, Unincorporated 3: The Doctor Who Fanzine Archives (Vol. 3: Writings on the New Series)

Time, Unincorporated 3: The Doctor Who Fanzine Archives (Vol. 3: Writings on the New Series)

In Time, Unincorporated, the best essays and commentary from a range of Doctor Who fanzines are collected and made available to a wider audience. In spirit, this series picks up the torch from Virgin's License Denied collection (1997), concentrating some of the most delightful, insightful and strange writings on Who into a single source.The third and final volume of this series contains nearly 65 essays that examine the new Doctor Who up to and including the 2010 series starring Matt Smith. The essays stem from a wide array of fanzines such as Enlightenment, Tides of Time, Shockeye's Kitchen, Movement and more.As a bonus, nearly 20 of the essays were written exclusively for this volume by the likes of Doctor Who script editor Andrew Cartmel; novelists Jonathan Blum, Kate Orman, Lloyd Rose and Steve Lyons; Tammy Garrison (Torchwood Babiez); and Lynne M. Thomas (Chicks Dig Time Lords). With a foreword by new-series writer Robert Shearman (Running Through Corridors).

A History and Critical Analysis of Blake’s 7, the 1978–1981 British Television Space Adventure

A History and Critical Analysis of Blake’s 7, the 1978–1981 British Television Space Adventure

Blake’s 7, Terry Nation’s science fiction tale of cosmic freedom fighters, became a hit series in Great Britain when it premiered in 1978. Eight years later, the show quickly became a cult program in America. A dramatization of futuristic outlaw heroes who defend the innocent from both alien and human conquering forces, the series might better be said to be equal parts Robin Hood and The Magnificent Seven. The series defied traditional genre elements of science fiction television, and developed the concept of the continual “story arc” years before such shows as Babylon 5 and Deep Space Nine. This book provides a critical history and episode guide for Blake’s 7, including commentaries for all 52 episodes. Also included are analytical essays on the show, dealing with such topics as themes, imagery and story arc; a consideration of the series as a futuristic Robin Hood myth; cinematography and visual effects; and an overview of Blake’s 7 in books, comics and videos. A detailed appendix lists the genre conventions found in the series. The author also includes information about Blake’s 7 fan clubs and Internet sites.

Time Unincorporated 1: The Doctor Who Fanzine Archives (Volume 1: Lance Parkin)

Time Unincorporated 1: The Doctor Who Fanzine Archives (Volume 1: Lance Parkin)

In Time, Unincorporated, the best essays and commentary from a range of Doctor Who fanzines are collected and here made available to a wider audience. In spirit, this series picks up the torch from Virgin’s Licence Denied collection (1997), concentrating some of the most delightful, insightful and strange writings on Doctor Who into a single source. Volume 1 of this series collects 15 years of Doctor Who-related essays and articles by Lance Parkin, one of the highest-regarded Doctor Who novelists. The cornerstone of this edition is a year-by-year survey and analysis of Doctor Who that Parkin wrote for the 40th Anniversary of Doctor Who (updated to the present), as well as a myriad of Parkin’s articles and columns from the fanzines Enlightenment and Matrix. Also included: Parkin’s original pitch for the celebrated Doctor Who novel The Infinity Doctors (1998), his extensive advice on the art of writing and more.

Return of the Living Dad

Return of the Living Dad

Benny returns to the TARDIS to follow up a clue to the whereabouts of a father who disappeared when she was a child. The trail leads to England in the year 1983 and to Admiral Isaac Summerfield who is leading a crew of aliens. Can Benny trust the man for w

Doctor Who and Philosophy

Bigger on the Inside

Doctor Who and Philosophy

Not only is Doctor Who the longest-running science fiction TV show in history, but it has also been translated into numerous languages, broadcast around the world, and referred to as the “way of the future” by some British politicians. The Classic Doctor Who series built up a loyal American cult following, with regular conventions and other activities. The new series, relaunched in 2005, has emerged from culthood into mass awareness, with a steadily growing viewership and major sales of DVDs. The current series, featuring the Eleventh Doctor, Matt Smith, is breaking all earlier records, in both the UK and the US. Doctor Who is a continuing story about the adventures of a mysterious alien known as “the Doctor,” a traveller of both time and space whose spacecraft is the TARDIS (Time and Relative Dimensions in Space), which from the outside looks like a British police telephone box of the 1950s. The TARDIS is “bigger on the inside than on the outside”—actually the interior is immense. The Doctor looks human, but has two hearts, and a knowledge of all languages in the universe. Periodically, when the show changes the leading actor, the Doctor “regenerates.”

The Doctor Who Programme Guide

The Doctor Who Programme Guide

The Doctor Who Programme Guide is the complete guide to every Doctor Who story shown on television. The stories are listed in order of broadcasting, starting with the first episode broadcast in 1963. Each entry includes the storyline, the cast list, and the names of the producer, script editor, writer and director, and the details of novelizations, video and audio cassette releases. This indispensable guide first appeared over twenty years ago, and immediately established itself as the single, most important reference work about Doctor Who. "THE bible to an entire generation of [Doctor Who] fans on both sides of the Atlantic." -Andrew Pixley, Celestial Toyroom "A real treat for Doctor Who buffs." -David McDonnell, Starlog "It sits invaluably upon every fan's bookshelf and is a constant source of reference." -Gary Russell, Doctor Who Monthly "A remarkable work of...dedicated scholarship." -Barry Letts, Producer, Doctor Who