Remembrance of Things Past

Remembrance of Things Past

Proust is the twentieth century's Dante, presenting us with a unique, unsettling picture of ourselves as jealous lovers and unmitigated snobs, frittering our lives away, with only the hope of art as a possible salvation.

Remembrance of Things Past

Swanns Way Within a Budding Grove

Remembrance of Things Past

Translation of: A la recherche du temps perdu.

Remembrance of Things Past Swanns Way

Remembrance of Things Past Swanns Way

The initial part of the story focuses on the romantic life of a middle aged man named Swann. Proust has used poetic style of words to describe the nature and environment of France. His sentence structure is impressive and filled with searing, insightful, and humorous criticisms of French society....

Remembrance of Things Past, Part 2

Within a Budding Grove

Remembrance of Things Past, Part 2

An adaptation of the seven books of Proust's masterpiece in graphic novel format, which explores themes of love, art, sexuality, memory, and time in late nineteenth-century France.

Remembrance of Things Past Swann's Way

Remembrance of Things Past Swann's Way

The initial part of the story focuses on the romantic life of a middle aged man named Swann.

A reader's guide to Remembrance of things past

A reader's guide to Remembrance of things past

Identifies characters, persons, places, and themes found in Marcel Proust's masterpiece

Marcel Proust's Search for Lost Time

A Reader's Guide to The Remembrance of Things Past

Marcel Proust's Search for Lost Time

An accessible, irreverent guide to one of the most admired—and entertaining—novels of the past century: Rememberance of Things Past. There is no other guide like this; a user-friendly and enticing entry into the marvelously enjoyable world of Proust. At seven volumes, three thousand pages, and more than four hundred characters, as well as a towering reputation as a literary classic, Proust’s novel can seem daunting. But though begun a century ago, in 1909, it is in fact as engaging and relevant to our times as ever. Patrick Alexander is passionate about Proust’s genius and appeal—he calls the work “outrageously bawdy and extremely funny”—and in his guide he makes it more accessible to the general reader through detailed plot summaries, historical and cultural background, a guide to the fifty most important characters, maps, family trees, illustrations, and a brief biography of Proust. Essential for readers and book groups currently reading Proust and who want help keeping track of the huge cast and intricate plot, this Reader’s Guide is also a wonderful introduction for students and new readers and a memory-refresher for long-time fans.