Reimagining A Raisin in the Sun

This book is a collection of four contemporary plays that reflect the themes of racial and cultural difference of Lorraine Hansberry's 1959 play A Raisin in the Sun.

Reimagining A Raisin in the Sun

This book is a collection of four contemporary plays that reflect the themes of racial and cultural difference of Lorraine Hansberry's 1959 play A Raisin in the Sun.

Text Presentation 2019

In Reimagining A raisin in the sun. Morrison, Toni. Song of Solomon. Knopf, 19.
norris, Bruce. Clybourne Park. In Reimagining A raisin in the sun. o'Hara, robert.
Etiquette of Vigilance. In Reimagining A raisin in the sun. Parks, suzan-lori.

Text   Presentation  2019

This volume is the sixteenth in a series dedicated to presenting the latest findings in the fields of comparative drama, performance, and dramatic textual analysis. Featuring some of the best work from the 2019 Comparative Drama Conference in Orlando, this book engages audiences with new research on contemporary and classic drama, performance studies, scenic design and adaptation theory in nine scholarly essays, two event transcripts and six book reviews. This year's highlights include an interview with playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins and a roundtable discussion on the sixtieth anniversary of Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun.

Reimagining Equality

... backdrop and inspired by her family's experience, Lorraine Hansberry wrote
the play that would become the first drama by a black woman to be performed on
Broadway. Despite A Raisin in the Sun's phenomenal. Reimagining. Equality. |. 6
.

Reimagining Equality

From the heroic lawyer who spoke out against Clarence Thomas in the historic confirmation hearings twenty years ago At the historic Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings, Anita Hill spoke out courageously about workplace sexual harassment. Now she turns to the topic of home. As our country reels from the subprime mortgage meltdown and the resulting devastation of so many families and communities, Hill takes us inside this “crisis of home” and exposes its deep roots in race and gender inequities, which continue to imperil every American’s ability to achieve the American Dream. In this period of recovery and its aftermath, what is at stake is the inclusive democracy the Constitution promises. The achievement of that ideal, Hill argues, depends on each American’s ability to secure a place that provides access to every opportunity our country offers. Building on the great strides of the women’s and civil rights movements, Hill presents concrete proposals that encourage us to broaden our thinking about home and to reimagine equality for America’s future.

Theatre and Race

Harvey Young introduces key ideas about race, before tracing its relationship with theatre and performance - from Ancient Athens to the present day.

Theatre and Race

The theatre has always been a place where conceptions of race and racism have been staged, shared and perpetuated. Harvey Young introduces key ideas about race, before tracing its relationship with theatre and performance - from Ancient Athens to the present day.

Reimagining American Theatre

... A Raisin in the Sun. An omnipresent stage manager hands Mama an award
when she slaps her son across the room for doubting the existence of God, and
all the actors slip into cultivated Shakespearean cadences ("What's gotten into
you?

Reimagining American Theatre

In his collection of essays and reviews, Robert Brustein makes the argument that the American Theatre is enjoying a renaissance that has not been unacknowledged.

The Cambridge Companion to African American Theatre

With contributions from the leading scholars in the field, this Companion provides a comprehensive and accessible overview of African American theatre, from the early nineteenth century to the present day.

The Cambridge Companion to African American Theatre

With contributions from the leading scholars in the field, this Companion provides a comprehensive and accessible overview of African American theatre, from the early nineteenth century to the present day. Along the way, it chronicles the evolution of African American theatre and its engagement with the wider community.

Reimagining Professional Development

As I struggled for an even partially adequate response , my mind went to
Langston Hughes ' s words immortalized in A Raisin in the Sun : " Whatever
happens to a dream deferred , does it dry up like a raisin in the sun ? " And I
thought to ...

Reimagining Professional Development


The Civil Rights Theatre Movement in New York 1939 1966

This book argues that African American theatre in the twentieth century represented a cultural front of the civil rights movement.

The Civil Rights Theatre Movement in New York  1939   1966

This book argues that African American theatre in the twentieth century represented a cultural front of the civil rights movement. Highlighting the frequently ignored decades of the 1940s and 1950s, Burrell documents a radical cohort of theatre artists who became critical players in the fight for civil rights both onstage and offstage, between the Popular Front and the Black Arts Movement periods. The Civil Rights Theatre Movement recovers knowledge of little-known groups like the Negro Playwrights Company and reconsiders Broadway hits including Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, showing how theatre artists staged radically innovative performances that protested Jim Crow and U.S. imperialism amidst a repressive Cold War atmosphere. By conceiving of class and gender as intertwining aspects of racism, this book reveals how civil rights theatre artists challenged audiences to reimagine the fundamental character of American democracy.

Prefiguring Postblackness

Prefiguring Postblackness explores the tensions between cultural memory of the African American freedom struggle and representations of African American identity staged in five plays between 1959 and 1969 during the civil rights era.

Prefiguring Postblackness

Prefiguring Postblackness explores the tensions between cultural memory of the African American freedom struggle and representations of African American identity staged in five plays between 1959 and 1969 during the civil rights era. Through close readings of the plays, their popular and African American print media reviews, and the cultural context in which they were produced, Carol Bunch Davis shows how these representations complicate narrow ideas of blackness, which often limit the freedom struggle era to Martin Luther King's nonviolent protest and cast Malcolm X's black nationalism as undermining the civil rights movement's advances. These five plays strategically revise the rhetoric, representations, ideologies, and iconography of the African American freedom struggle, subverting its dominant narrative. This revision critiques racial uplift ideology's tenets of civic and moral virtue as a condition of African American full citizenship. The dramas also reimagine the Black Arts movement's restrictive notions of black authenticity as a condition of racial identity, and their staged representations construct a counter-narrative to cultural memory of the freedom struggle during that very era. In their use of a "postblack ethos" to enact African American subjectivity, the plays envision black identity beyond the quest for freedom, anticipating what blackness might look like when it moves beyond the struggle. The plays under discussion range from the canonical (Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun and Amiri Baraka's Dutchman) to celebrated, yet understudied works (Alice Childress's Wine in the Wilderness, Howard Sackler's The Great White Hope, and Charles Gordone's No Place to Be Somebody). Finally, Davis discusses recent revivals, showing how these 1960s plays shape dimensions of modern drama well beyond the decade of their creation.

New York

Sat . at 8 , Wed . and Sat . at 2 , Sun . at 3 . ... RAISIN IN THE SUN All eyes are on
Sean “ P . Diddy " Combs as he makes his Broadway debut in Lorraine
Hansberry ' s 1959 drama about the deferred dreams of an AfricanAmerican
family living ...

New York