Redbrick

A Social and Architectural History of Britain's Civic Universities

Redbrick

In the last two centuries Britain has experienced a revolution in higher education, with the number of students rising from a few hundred to several million. Yet the institutions that drove - and still drive - this change have been all but ignored by historians. Drawing on a decade's research, and based on work in dozens of archives, many of them used for the very first time, this is the first full-scale study of the civic universities - new institutions in the nineteenth century reflecting the growth of major Victorian cities in Britain, such as Liverpool, Manchester, Birmingham, York, and Durham - for more than 50 years. Tracing their story from the 1780s until the 2010s, it is an ambitious attempt to write the Redbrick revolution back into history. William Whyte argues that these institutions created a distinctive and influential conception of the university - something that was embodied in their architecture and expressed in the lives of their students and staff. It was this Redbrick model that would shape their successors founded in the twentieth century: ensuring that the normal university experience in Britain is a Redbrick one. Using a vast range of previously untapped sources, Redbrick is not just a new history, but a new sort of university history: one that seeks to rescue the social and architectural aspects of education from the disregard of previous scholars, and thus provide the richest possible account of university life. It will be of interest to students and scholars of modern British history, to anyone who has ever attended university, and to all those who want to understand how our higher education system has developed - and how it may evolve in the future.

Redbrick University

A Guide for Parents, Sixth-Formers and Students

Redbrick University

Redbrick University: A Guide for Parents, Sixth-Formers and Students provides constructive criticism of the Redbrick University. This book serves as a guide to young students on the attractions of university life as well as the difficulties ahead. Organized into 11 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the predicaments faced by students in their initial months in the university. This text then describes the important observation that a university teacher needs to improve his or her status regularly within the university, and, in order to merit academic promotion, he or she must produce a substantial amount of original research. Other chapters consider the relative values of the different types of accommodation available to young students. The final chapter presents the various classifications of the societies and clubs at the university, including sport, recreation, cultural, political, and religious societies. This book is a valuable resource for teachers, parents and students.

Redbrick and Bluestockings

Women at Victoria, 1899-1993

Redbrick and Bluestockings


Redbrick and These Vital Days

Redbrick and These Vital Days

"After describing life at Redbrick in war-time and discussing such problems as salaries, residence, and specialization, which will arise in the near future, or have already arisen, he turns to post-war problems - inter-university co-ordination, professorial freedom, the position of women - and incidentally makes a spirited reply to the criticisms which have been directed against his strictures on he "leisured professor" - Mr Truscot then discusses the extra-mural and regional work, both urban and rural, which he thinks should be undertaken by all universities, old and new. Finally, he turns to three recent reports which have a bearing on university life: the Norwood Report, especially those parts of it which deal with the passage from school to university, the McNair Report and the alternative schemes which it proposes for the training of teachers ; and the Fleming Report on Public Schools, to the present position and future possibilities of which he devotes his last two chapters."

Red Brick in the Land of Steady Habits

Creating the University of Connecticut, 1881-2006

Red Brick in the Land of Steady Habits

A lively history of the University of Connecticut from its founding to the present day

Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay

Reflections on Art, Family, and Survival

Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay

New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2012 "Beautiful, haunted, evocative and so open to where memory takes you. I kept thinking that this is the book that I have waited for: where objects, and poetry intertwine. Just wonderful and completely sui generis." (Edmund de Waal, author of The Hare with Amber Eyes) An unforgettable voyage across the reaches of America and the depths of memory, Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay follows one incredible family to discover a unique craft tradition grounded in America¹s vast natural landscape. Looking back through the generations, renowned critic Christopher Benfey unearths an ancestry--and an aesthetic--that is quintessentially American. His mother descends from colonial explorers and Quaker craftsmen, who carved new arts from the trackless wilds of the frontier. Benfey¹s father escaped from Nazi Europe--along with his aunt and uncle, the famed Bauhaus artists Josef and Anni Albers--by fleeing across the Atlantic and finding an eventual haven in the American South. Bricks form the backbone of life in North Carolina¹s rural Piedmont, where Benfey¹s mother was raised among centuries-old folk potteries, tobacco farms, and clay pits. Her father, like his father before him, believed in the deep honesty of brick, that men might build good lives with the bricks they laid. Nurtured in this red-clay world of ancient craft and Quaker radicalism, Benfey¹s mother was poised to set out from home when a tragic romance cracked her young life in two. Salvaging the broken shards of his mother¹s past and exploring the revitalized folk arts resisting industrialization, Benfey discovers a world brimming with possibility and creativity. Benfey¹s father had no such foundation in his young life, nor did his aunt and uncle. Exiled artists from Berlin¹s Bauhaus school, Josef and Anni Albers were offered sanctuary not far from the Piedmont at Black Mountain College. A radical experiment in unifying education and art, Black Mountain made a monumental impact on American culture under Josef¹s leadership, counting Robert Rauschenberg, John Cage, and Buckminster Fuller among its influential students and teachers. Focusing on the natural world, innovative craftsmanship, and the physical reality of materials, Black Mountain became a home and symbol for an emerging vision of American art. Threading these stories together into a radiant and mesmerizing harmony, Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay is an extraordinary quest to the heart of America and the origins of its art.

The Old Red Brick

A Remembrance

The Old Red Brick

We were the Three Bears, my darling cousin Christopher, our forever friend Bryan, and I… In the soft accents of the Carolina Coast, the unnamed narrator invites readers to come sit beside her as she recalls the joys and hurts of life in The Old Red Brick house. Grand-Dad and Ollie doing their damndest to keep the 20th century from too much intrusion. Boo and Halsey trying, and failing, to find a life for themselves outside the house’s protection. But, mostly it is the story of the Three Bears… Who they were, how they grew, and what happened once they left The Old Red Brick.