Reading the Psalms with Luther

The Psalter for Individual & Family Devotions

Reading the Psalms with Luther

Martin Luther loved the Psalter. This is noticeably evident in his short introductions to the psalms as he allows readers a glimpse into his theology and prayer life. Luther's writings demonstrate how he saw the Psalter as a Christ-centered model for Christian prayer. He classifies each psalm and applies the message of the text to the life lived under the cross. Using the text of the psalms from the English Standard Version, coupled with classic prayers, readers use this edition to familiarize themselves with this beloved book of the Bible. This devotional also helps readers deepen their understanding of the Christological aspect of the psalms and Luther's perspective on them. Open Reading the Psalms with Luther today for a fresh look at one of Luther's favorite Old Testament books.

Psalms of the Faithful

Luther's Early Reading of the Psalter in Canonical Context

Psalms of the Faithful

Offers insight into Luther's understanding and interpretation of the Psalms.

Preaching and Teaching the Psalms

Preaching and Teaching the Psalms

Renowned and beloved Psalms scholar James Luther Mays shares in this book some of his most influential ideas about the Psalms and shows the reader how this rich Old Testament poetry can be taught and preached in the church. The book's editors, Patrick Miller and Gene Tucker, have carefully brought together Mays's best insights into the meaning of the Psalms and shown us in his sermons how a master with a love for the church handles these beautiful texts.

Psalms Through the Centuries, Volume Two

A Reception History Commentary on Psalms 1 - 72

Psalms Through the Centuries, Volume Two

Psalms Through the Centuries: Volume Two provides the first ever extensive commentary on the Jewish and Christian reception history of the first two books of the Psalter (Psalms 1-41 and 42-72). It explores the various uses of the Psalms, over two millennia, in translation and commentary, liturgy and prayer, study and preaching, musical composition and artistic illustration, poetic and dramatic imitation, and contemporary discourse. With lavish illustrations, using examples from both music and art, Psalms Through the Centuries: Volume Two offers a detailed commentary on each psalm, with an extensive bibliography, a large glossary of terms, and helpful indices. It is an ideal resource both for students and scholars in the academy and for lay people and ministers in church and synagogue. Psalms Through the Centuries is published within the Wiley Blackwell Commentary series. Further information about this innovative reception history series is available at www.bbibcomm.info

Martin Luther on Reading the Bible as Christian Scripture

The Messiah in Luther's Biblical Hermeneutic and Theology

Martin Luther on Reading the Bible as Christian Scripture

Above all else that the sixteenth-century German Reformer was known for, Martin Luther was a Doctor of the Holy Scriptures. One of the most characteristic features of Luther’s approach to Scripture was his resolved christological interpretation of the Bible. Many of the Reformer’s interpreters have looked back upon Luther’s “Christ-centered” exposition of the Scriptures with sentimentality but have often labeled it as “Christianization,” particularly in regards to Luther’s approach of the Old Testament, dismissing his relevance for today’s faithful readers of God’s Word. This study revisits this assessment of Luther’s christological interpretation of Scripture by way of critical analysis of the Reformer’s “prefaces to the Bible” that he wrote for his translation of the Scriptures into the German vernacular. This work contends that Luther foremost believes Jesus Christ to be the sensus literalis of Scripture on the basis of the Bible’s messianic promise, not enforcing a dogmatic principle onto the scriptural text and its biblical authors that would be otherwise foreign to them. This study asserts that Luther’s exegesis of the Bible’s “letter” (i.e., his engagement with the biblical text) is primarily responsible for his conviction that Christ is Holy Scripture’s literal sense.

Psalms Through the Centuries

Psalms Through the Centuries

This is the first of a two-volume bible commentary covering the Psalms and examining the role of these biblical poems throughout Jewish and Christian history. Provides a fascinating introduction to the literary, historical, and theological background of psalmody Examines the psalms through liturgy and prayer, study and preaching, translation and imitation, and musical composition and artistic illustration Includes illustrations of significant psalms, helpful maps, and an extensive bibliography; an expanded bibliography to accompany the book is also available at www.wiley.com/go/gillingham A forthcoming second volume is planned, which will take an alternative psalm-by-psalm approach Now available in paperback, and published in the innovative reception-history series, Blackwell Bible Commentaries

The Oxford Handbook of Martin Luther's Theology

The Oxford Handbook of Martin Luther's Theology

As celebrations of the five-hundredth anniversary of Martin Luther's initiation of the most dramatic reform movement in the history of Christianity approach, 47 essays by historians and theologians from 15 countries provide insight into the background and context, the content, and the impact of his way of thought. Nineteenth-century Chinese educational reformers, twentieth-century African and Indian social reformers, German philosophers and Christians of many traditions on every continent have found in Luther's writings stimulation and provocation for addressing modern problems. This volume offers studies of the late medieval intellectual milieus in which his thought was formed, the hermeneutical principles that guided his reading and application of the Bible, the content of his formulations of Christian teaching on specific topics, his social and ethic thought, the ways in which his contemporaries, both supporters and opponents, helped shape his ideas, the role of specific genre in developing his positions on issues of the day, and the influences he has exercised in the past and continues to exercise today in various parts of the world and the Christian church. Authors synthesize the scholarly debates and analysis of Luther's thinking and point to future areas of research and exploration of his thought.

Psalms 1-2

Gateway to the Psalter

Psalms 1-2

As against the form-critical approach, which sees the first two psalms as more or less random examples of the torah and royal types, this study argues for a deliberate and cogent arrangement of the Psalms 1 and 2. A detailed linguistic analysis of and comparison between these two apparently disparate psalms at the outset of the book reveals the purpose for their juxtaposition. The principal characters in the first psalm are further described in the second. The man of Psalm 1 is portrayed in eschatological terms as an impeccable royal, sacerdotal, and all-conquering military figure. He appears again in Psalm 2 but as a heavenly-enthroned victorious priest and king. His opponents, the wicked in Psalm 1, are identified in Psalm 2 as recalcitrant rulers and peoples who reject his rule and seek to do away with him. However, the calculated divine response to their plotting assures their ultimate defeat unless they submit to him. This cohesive and coherent introductory pair of psalms sets a pattern at the beginning for reading all those that follow. Indeed, a thorough understanding of the first two psalms and their integrated message is a prerequisite for understanding the purpose of the entire book.

Psalms

The Prayer Book of the Bible

Psalms

The author explains one of his secrets behind the powerful witness of his own life--that he had learned to pray the Psalms and from them drew on the power of God in his years of imprisonment--in a new edition that includes a brief biographical sketch by a friend and biographer of the author, which helps us understand the man who used the Psalms as his prayer book. Original.

Martin Luther, the Bible, and the Jewish People

A Reader

Martin Luther, the Bible, and the Jewish People

The place and significance of Martin Luther in the long history of Christian anti-Jewish polemic has been and continues to be a contested issue. The literature on the subject is substantial and diverse. While efforts to exonerate Luther as "merely" a man of his times who "merely" perpetuated what he had received from his cultural and theological tradition have rightly been jettisoned, there still persists even among the educated public the perception that the truly problematic aspects of Luther's anti-Jewish attitudes are confined to the final stages of his career. It is true that Luther's anti-Jewish rhetoric intensified toward the end of his life, but reading Luther with a careful eye toward "the Jewish question," it becomes clear that Luther's theological presuppositions toward Judaism and the Jewish people are a central, core component of his thought throughout his career, not just at the end. It follows then that it is impossible to understand the heart and building blocks of Luther's theology (justification, faith, liberation, salvation, grace) without acknowledging the crucial role of "the Jews" in his fundamental thinking. Luther was constrained by ideas, images, and superstitions regarding the Jews and Judaism that he inherited from medieval Christian tradition. But the engine in the development of Luther's theological thought as it relates to the Jews is his biblical hermeneutics. Just as "the Jewish question" is a central, core component of his thought, so biblical interpretation (and especially Old Testament interpretation) is the primary arena in which fundamental claims about the Jews and Judaism are formulated and developed.