Re-Modeling the Brand Purchase Funnel

Conceptualization and Empirical Application

Re-Modeling the Brand Purchase Funnel

Alexander Dierks conceptualizes and applies a more nuanced model of the brand purchase funnel. The re-conceptualization builds on a holistic, theory-based, and practically applicable set of 10 propositions, which capture dynamics of consumers’ contemporary search and decision behavior and allow for a more differentiated assessment of brand performance across the buying cycle. The model’s value add is investigated based on two survey-based studies from the automotive and the electricity industry. Using logistic regression analysis, the author uncovers insightful differences in the determinants of consumers’ purchase decisions depending on the stage of consideration set formation. The findings support the employment of the more nuanced funnel in brand management.

Economics and the Mind

Economics and the Mind

Economics is often defined as the science of choice or human action. But choice and action are essentially mental phenomena, an aspect rarely mentioned in the economics discourse. Choice, while not always a conscious or rational process, is held to involve beliefs, desires, intentions and arguably even free will. Actions are often opposed to mere bodily movements, with the former being in some sense only understandable in reference to mental processes while the latter are understandable in entirely non-mental, physical terms. While philosophers have long concerned themselves with the connections between these concepts, economists have tended to steer clear of what might appear to be an a priori debate. At the same time, philosophers working on these important notions have tended to not dirty their hands with the empirical, real-world applications in which economists are specialized. This volume fills these gaps by bringing economists and philosophers of mind together to explore the intersection of their disciplines.

From Adam to Noah-The Numbers Game

Why the Genealogy Puzzles of Genesis 5 and 11 Are in the Bible

From Adam to Noah-The Numbers Game

i>From Adam to Noah-The Numbers Game," shows that the genealogy of Adam in Genesis 5 is a puzzle. Genesis 5 reports that people lived for over 900 years.Where are the clues that the genealogy of Genesis 5 is a puzzle?Here's the first: 1x56 years: Lamech's birth to Adam's death2x56 + 1 years: Lamech's birth to Enoch's disappearance 3x56 years: Lamech's birth to Seth's death Here's the second clue: 416 years: Lamech's death to Kenan's death 416 years: Lamech's birth to Mahalalel's death 416 years: Enosh's death to the birth of Noah's sons And the third clue: 1x84 years: Lamech's birth to Enosh's death 2x84 + 416 years: Jared's death to Noah's death 3x84 years: Enoch's birth to Lamech's birth A collection of real human ages would never display a pattern like this. Solving the puzzle reveals a fully functional, 2500+ year old calendar that is as accurate as our modern calendar. The extracted calendar is based on a 364-day year with a 369-day leap year and a 365-day year that occurs once every 33 years. The average length of a year for this 33-year calendar is 365.242424 days which is very near the length of the vernal equinox year of 365.242374 days on which our calendar is based. It is now clear that the Bible contains science. It's ancient science, but it's real science. The Bible writers were ancient scientists and the Bible is a repository of their work. If you're a scientist, engineer or technician and you've found it impossible to take the Bible seriously, now you can. Just as we were unable to recognize this calendar as a calendar, the science of the Bible has not been recognized as science because its' authors spoke in parables and riddles. This was a part of the Biblical culture. The book of Proverbs says that it will teach the reader how to understand the "words of the wise" which consist of proverbs, riddles and figures (puzzles). "Besides being wise, the Preacher also taught the people knowledge, weighing and studying and arranging proverbs with great care." (Ecc 12:9 RSV) "My mouth shall speak wisdom; the meditation of my heart shall be understanding. I will incline my ear to a proverb; I will solve my riddle to the music of the lyre. (Psa 49:3-4 RSV) So when Jesus taught using parables and riddles he was following a tradition that was ancient when Solomon was king. This kind of riddle extends far beyond the genealogy of Genesis 5. Genesis 1 to 11 contains a collection of riddles woven into a single fabric. The riddles continue through the book of Revelation. Once we understand these riddles we discover that the Bible actually contains a consistent, workable philosophy that can actually explain the way the world works. "

The Development and Education of the Mind

The Selected Works of Howard Gardner

The Development and Education of the Mind

Leading American psychologist and educator Howard Gardner has assembled his most important writings about education. Spanning over thirty years, this collection reveals the thinking, the concepts and the empirical research that have made Gardner one of the most respected and cited educational authorities of our time. Trained originally as a psychologist at Harvard University, Howard Gardner begins with personal sketches and tributes to his major teachers and mentors. He then presents the work for which he is best-known – the theory of multiple intelligences – including a summary of the original theory and accounts of how it has been updated over the years. Other seminal papers featured include: education in the arts the nature of understanding powerful ways in which to assess learning broad statements about the educational enterprise how education is likely to evolve in the globalised world of the twenty-first century.

Models of Brain and Mind

Physical, Computational and Psychological Approaches

Models of Brain and Mind

The phenomenon of consciousness has always been a central question for philosophers and scientists. Emerging in the past decade are new approaches to the understanding of consciousness in a scientific light. This book presents a series of essays by leading thinkers giving an account of the current ideas prevalent in the scientific study of consciousness. The value of the book lies in the discussion of this interesting though complex subject from different points of view ranging from physics and computer science to the cognitive sciences. Reviews of controversial ideas related to the philosophy of mind from western and eastern sources including classical Indian first person methodologies provide a breadth of coverage that has seldom been attempted in a book before. Additionally, chapters relating to the new approaches in computational modeling of higher order cognitive function and consciousness are included. The book is of great value for established as well as young researchers from a wide cross-section of interdisciplinary scientific backgrounds, aiming to pursue research in this field, as well as an informed public. * Presents the latest developments in the scientific study of consciousness * Critically reviews different theoretical and philosophical explanations related to the subject * An important book for both students and researchers in designing research projects on consciousness

Stochastic Volatilities and Correlations, Extreme Values and Modeling the Macroeconomic Environment, Under Which Brazilian Banks Operate

Stochastic Volatilities and Correlations, Extreme Values and Modeling the Macroeconomic Environment, Under Which Brazilian Banks Operate

Using monthly data for a set of variables, we examine the out-of-sample performance of various variance/covariance models and find that no model has consistently outperformed the others. We also show that it is possible to increase the probability mass toward the tails and to match reasonably well the historical evolution of volatilities by changing a decay factor appropriately. Finally, we implement a simple stochastic volatility model and simulate the credit transition matrix for two large Brazilian banks and show that this methodology has the potential to improve simulated transition probabilities as compared to the constant volatility case. In particular, it can shift CTM probabilities towards lower credit risk categories.

How Can the Human Mind Occur in the Physical Universe?

How Can the Human Mind Occur in the Physical Universe?

"The question for me is how can the human mind occur in the physical universe. We now know that the world is governed by physics. We now understand the way biology nestles comfortably within that. The issue is how will the mind do that as well."--Allen Newell, December 4, 1991, Carnegie Mellon University The argument John Anderson gives in this book was inspired by the passage above, from the last lecture by one of the pioneers of cognitive science. Newell describes what, for him, is the pivotal question of scientific inquiry, and Anderson gives an answer that is emerging from the study of brain and behavior. Humans share the same basic cognitive architecture with all primates, but they have evolved abilities to exercise abstract control over cognition and process more complex relational patterns. The human cognitive architecture consists of a set of largely independent modules associated with different brain regions. In this book, Anderson discusses in detail how these various modules can combine to produce behaviors as varied as driving a car and solving an algebraic equation, but focuses principally on two of the modules: the declarative and procedural. The declarative module involves a memory system that, moment by moment, attempts to give each person the most appropriate possible window into his or her past. The procedural module involves a central system that strives to develop a set of productions that will enable the most adaptive response from any state of the modules. Newell argued that the answer to his question must take the form of a cognitive architecture, and Anderson organizes his answer around the ACT-R architecture, but broadens it by bringing in research from all areas of cognitive science, including how recent work in brain imaging maps onto the cognitive architecture.

The Philosophy of Mind

Classical Problems/contemporary Issues

The Philosophy of Mind

Bringing together the best classical and contemporary writings in the philosophy of mind and organized by topic, this anthology allows readers to follow the development of thinking in five broad problem areas - the mind/body problem, mental causation, associationism/connectionism, mental imagery, and innate ideas - over 2500 years of philosophy. The writings range from Plato and Descartes to Fodor and the PDP research group, showing how many of the current concerns in the philosophy of mind and cognitive science are firmly rooted in history. The editors have provided helpful introductions to each of the main sections. Brian Beakley is Assistant Professor in the Philosophy Department at Eastern Illinois University. Peter Ludlow is Assistant Professor in the Philosophy Department at SUNY, Stony Brook. Readings from: Plato, Aristotle, St. Thomas Aquinas, Rene Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, Nicolas Malebranche, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, John Locke, George Berkeley, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, John Stuart Mill, Thomas Henry Huxley, William James, Oswald Kulpe, John Watson, jean Piaget, Gilbert Ryle, U. T. Place, Hilary Putnam, Daniel Dennett, Donald Davidson, Jerry Fodor, Roger Shepard, Jacqueline Metzler, Saul Kripke, Ned Block, Noam Chomsky, Stephen Kosslyn, Zenon Pylyshyn, Patricia Churchland, James McClelland, David Rumelhart, Geoffrey Hinton, Paul Smolensky, Seymour Papert.

Teaching with the Brain in Mind

Teaching with the Brain in Mind

When the first edition of Teaching with the Brain in Mind was published in 1998, it quickly became an ASCD best-seller, and it has gone on to inspire thousands of educators to apply brain research in their classroom teaching. Now, author Eric Jensen is back with a completely revised and updated edition of his classic work, featuring new research and practical strategies to enhance student comprehension and improve student achievement. In easy to understand, engaging language, Jensen provides a basic orientation to the brain and its various systems and explains how they affect learning. After discussing what parents and educators can do to get children’s brains in good shape for school, Jensen goes on to explore topics such as motivation, critical thinking skills, optimal educational environments, emotions, and memory. He offers fascinating insights on a number of specific issues, including * How to tap into the brain’s natural reward system. * The value of feedback. * The importance of prior knowledge and mental models. * The vital link between movement and cognition. * Why stress impedes learning. * How social interaction affects the brain. * How to boost students’ ability to encode, maintain, and retrieve learning. * Ways to connect brain research to curriculum, assessment, and staff development. Jensen’s repeated message to educators is simple: You have far more influence on students’ brains than you realize . . . and you have an obligation to take advantage of the incredible revelations that science is providing. The revised and updated edition of Teaching with the Brain in Mind helps you do just that.