Twentieth-century Italian Literature in English Translation

An Annotated Bibliography 1929-1997

Twentieth-century Italian Literature in English Translation

This bibliography lists English-language translations of twentieth-century Italian literature published chiefly in book form between 1929 and 1997, encompassing fiction, poetry, plays, screenplays, librettos, journals and diaries, and correspondence.

Encyclopedia of Italian Literary Studies

Encyclopedia of Italian Literary Studies

The Encyclopedia of Italian Literary Studies is a two-volume reference book containing some 600 entries on all aspects of Italian literary culture. It includes analytical essays on authors and works, from the most important figures of Italian literature to little known authors and works that are influential to the field. The Encyclopedia is distinguished by substantial articles on critics, themes, genres, schools, historical surveys, and other topics related to the overall subject of Italian literary studies. The Encyclopedia also includes writers and subjects of contemporary interest, such as those relating to journalism, film, media, children's literature, food and vernacular literatures. Entries consist of an essay on the topic and a bibliographic portion listing works for further reading, and, in the case of entries on individuals, a brief biographical paragraph and list of works by the person. It will be useful to people without specialized knowledge of Italian literature as well as to scholars.

Face to Face/Faccia a Faccia

Face to Face/Faccia a Faccia

The short story writers featured in this brief anthology – all established figures on the Italian literary scene – have been specifically chosen as being representative of the various geographical regions in the Italian peninsula, ranging from Ginzburg, Pavese and Soldati (Piedmont), Colombi Guidotti and Guareschi (Emilia Romagna region), Tozzi (Tuscany), D’Annunzio (Abruzzi region) and Moravia (Lazio region) to Pirandello and Verga (Sicily) and Deledda (Sardinia). Twelve of these literary masters’ very best novelle – richly diverse both thematically and stylistically – can be read in the original, unabridged Italian with parallel English translations, accompanied by a brief account of the life and literary achievements of each writer, as well as a few notes on the context in which the narrative was written and some relevant features of theme and content. The novelle themselves, originally published in Italy between 1880 (marking the publication of Verga’s La lupa) and 1971 (the year of the publication of Soldati’s Una donna comprensiva), span almost a whole century. Although presented in chronological order of publication – being self-contained racconti – they can be read in any order. All of them lend themselves to the leitmotif of the collection: that of a woman as the central character (D’Annunzio’s Candia, the Princess in Deledda’s fairy-tale, Pirandello’s Mommina, gnà Pina in Verga’s story, etc.). Two of the writers, Grazia Deledda and Natalia Ginzburg, are themselves women writing about women. The anthology, on the one hand, offers readers the opportunity to savour a few delights of Italian literature and culture, and, on the other, promotes effective language learning through a wide spectrum of language and styles. While remaining faithful to the originals, the translations lay emphasis on readability and fluency, thus making their perusal a pleasurable experience in itself. In addition, the stories in this collection will certainly stimulate further interest in Italian literature.

My Husband

My Husband

In this short story collection, Dacia Moraini explores the vexing, tragic, and often humorous experiences of women living in modern urban Italy. With a style as lean as Samuel Beckett's, and a love of the absurd that rivals Eugene Ionesco, Maraini's stories are both poignant and wickedly funny. The writer's ironic lens zooms in to examine sexual relations, working conditions, women's issues, and family dynamics, illuminating the lives of an entire generation. With classic existential angst, Maraini's characters are often profoundly dissatisfied with their situations, but also ill-equipped to initiate any real change. Originally published as Mio marito in 1968, this is the first English translation of My Husband.

Agostino

Agostino

Thirteen-year-old Agostino is spending the summer at a Tuscan seaside resort with his beautiful widowed mother. When she takes up with a cocksure new companion, Agostino, feeling ignored and unloved, begins hanging around with a group of local young toughs. Though repelled by their squalor and brutality, and repeatedly humiliated for his weakness and ignorance when it comes to women and sex, the boy is increasingly, masochistically drawn to the gang and its rough games. He finds himself unable to make sense of his troubled feelings. Hoping to be full of manly calm, he is instead beset by guilty curiosity and an urgent desire to sever, at any cost, the thread of troubled sensuality that binds him to his mother. Alberto Moravia’s classic, startling portrait of innocence lost was written in 1942 but rejected by Fascist censors and not published until 1944, when it became a best seller and secured the author the first literary prize of his career. Revived here in a new translation by Michael F. Moore, Agostino is poised to captivate a twenty-first-century audience.

Italian Stories - Novelle Italiane

Italian Stories - Novelle Italiane

Eleven great stories in original Italian with vivid, accurate English translations on facing pages, teaching and practice aids, Italian-English vocabulary, more. Chronologically arranged stories by Boccaccio, Machiavelli, d'Annunzio, Pirandello and Moravia, plus significant works by lesser-knowns.

Italian Quarterly

Italian Quarterly