Queering the Tarot

Queering the Tarot

Tarot is best used as a tool for self-discovery, healing, growth, empowerment, and liberation. Tarot archetypes provide the reader with a window into present circumstances and future potential. But what if that window only opened up on a world that was white, European, and heterosexual? The interpretations of the tarot that have been passed down through tradition presuppose a commonality and normalcy among humanity. At the root of card meanings are archetypes that we accept without questioning. But at what point do archetypes become stereotypes? Humanity is diverse--culturally, spiritually, sexually. Tarot has the power to serve a greater population, with the right keys to unlock the tarot's deeper meanings. In Queering the Tarot, Cassandra Snow deconstructs the meanings of the 78 cards explaining the ways in which each card might be interpreted against the norm. Queering the Tarot explores themes of sexuality, coming out, gender and gender-queering, sources of oppression and empowerment, and many other topics especially familiar to not-straight folks. Cassandra's identity-based approach speaks directly to those whose identity is either up in the air or consuming the forefront of their consciousness. It also speaks to those struggling with mental illness or the effects of trauma, all seekers looking for personal affirmation that who they are is okay.

Queering Your Craft

Witchcraft from the Margins

Queering Your Craft

Reclaims witchcraft, putting it into the hands of those who need it most: queer and marginalized people and their fiercest allies. Witchcraft has always belonged to the outsiders and outcasts in society, yet so much of the practice enforces and adheres to the same hierarchy we face in the world at large - a hierarchy that isolates and hurts those living beyond society's binaries and boundaries. While there are books that address magick for resistance and queer myth, until now there has not been one that specifically addresses the practice of queer magick from an LGBTQ+ standpoint. Queering the Craft combines queer aesthetic and culture (like DIY culture and an emphasis on chosen family over formal covens) with pagan and metaphysical spiritual practice in a way that is commonplace but has not been written about until now. This book covers the personal, the collective, and the political, and how deeply intertwined all three are in a magickal practice for those who are LGBTQ+. In this introduction to witchcraft, Snow presents why/how each concept is important to a queer craft, or how to approach it from a queer mindset. For example, conventional prayer, words, and symbols have always been problematic in a queer universe: How to make them work and still be true to yourself? The bulk of the book is about learning the craft. The latter portion is a grimoire of spells. While accessible to beginning witches, Queering the Craft provides new and inspiring information for longtime practitioners interested in a pure and personal approach that avoids the baggage of history and stereotype.

Tarot for Troubled Times

Confront Your Shadow, Heal Your Self & Transform the World

Tarot for Troubled Times

Out of Darkness Comes the Light of Transformation Each of us has a shadow that darkens our inner and outer lives. In Tarot for Troubled Times, Shaheen Miro and Theresa Reed show us how working with the shadow—facing it directly, leaning into it rather than away—releases power that can free ourselves from negative mental habits and destructive emotions to find healing ourselves and others. Tarot, as the authors show, offers a rich and subtle path for this profound transformation. Through this book, you will discover a different approach to tarot, life, and self-empowerment. Befriend our shadow by working with the archetypes of the Major Arcana Discover—through affirmations, tarot prescriptions, and other healing modalities—how to empower ourselves and find our true voices Take our newly found powers and speak out so that we can become a helpful ally for the light and begin to do your greater work in the world Tarot for Troubled Times is not just another book on how to read the tarot—the authors provide specialty readings and suggested practices for issues such as grief, addiction, depression, fear, anger, divorce, illness, abuse, and oppression, and provide practical suggestions for stepping up as an ally or leader so that you can shape social policies. With a selection of mindful, introspective tarot spreads, you’ll learn how the Tarot can help you rewrite your healing story and change your life, and help transform the world.

Queering the Museum

Queering the Museum

Queering the Museum develops a queer analysis of the ways in which museums construct themselves, their core business, and their publics through the, often unconscious, use of inherited ways of knowing and doing. Providing a critique of both the practices and conventions associated with the modern public museum, and the ontological assumptions that inform them, the authors consider recent discourse around inclusion in museums and explore the ways this has been taken up in practice. Highlighting the limits of particular approaches to inclusion, and the failure to move away from a traditional museological paradigm, the book outlines an alternative critical museological approach that the authors refer to as ‘queer’. Providing readers with the critical tools necessary for a profound rethinking of museum practice, the book also responds to and problematises the growing call for social inclusion. Queering the Museum will appeal to academics, students, and museum and arts sector practitioners with an interest in critical theory or queer practice. It will be of particular interest to those working in the fields of museum studies, sociology, archaeology, anthropology, cultural studies, media, social policy, politics, philosophy, and history.

Queering Femininity

Sexuality, Feminism and the Politics of Presentation

Queering Femininity

Queering Femininity focuses on femininity as a style of gender presentation and asks how (and whether) it can be refigured as a creative and queer style of the body. Drawing on a range of feminist texts and interviews with self-identifying queer femmes from the LGBTQ community, Hannah McCann argues that the tendency to evaluate femininity as only either oppressive or empowering limits our understanding of its possibilities. She considers the dynamic aspects of feminine embodiment that cannot simply be understood in terms of gender normativity and negotiates a path between understanding both the attachments people hold to particular gender identities and styles, and recognising the punitive realities of dominant gender norms and expectations. Topics covered range from second wave feminist critiques of beauty culture, to the importance of hair in queer femme presentation. This book offers students and researchers of Gender, Queer and Sexuality Studies a fresh new take on the often troubled relationship between feminism and femininity, a critical but generous reading that highlights the potential for an affirmative orientation that is not confined by the demands of identity politics.

Queering Cold War poetry

ethics of vulnerability in Cuba and the United States

Queering Cold War poetry


Cassell's Encyclopedia of Queer Myth, Symbol, and Spirit

Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Lore

Cassell's Encyclopedia of Queer Myth, Symbol, and Spirit

An A-Z reference source on the theme of same-sex desire, gender variance and the sacred, this book examines the often-suppressed spiritual dimension of homosexuality. Its coverage includes archetypal figures such as deities, spirits and the characters of fairy tales; sacred texts including religious narratives; myths and legends; symbols and metaphors; persons and groups embodying the domain, such as Native American Indian berdaches; and works of art, including those of painting, sculpture, music, dance, drama and film.

Feminist Narratives and the Sociology of Religion

Feminist Narratives and the Sociology of Religion

Despite the steady growth of feminism in sociology, little attention has been paid to feminist research on religion. Nason-Clark and Neitz begin to fill this gap, asking leading feminist sociologists of religion to reflect on their work and lives. In addition, the editors include responses from the next generation of feminist sociologists of religion to see how their experiences differ from those of their teachers. The essays show how these feminist scholars construct narratives of their lives and work even among contradictions and interruptions. They show how the researcher, the researched and the research method are all closely intertwined. And they show how these researchers strive to make heard the voices of those they have chosen to study. Feminist Narratives and the Sociology of Religion is an essential text to see how feminist perspectives shape this field. Published in cooperation with the Association for the Sociology of Religion