Pz.Kpfw. III Family

Pz.Kpfw. III Family

A big decal sheet with 1:72, 1:48 and 1:35 individual and national markings for 8 Pz.Kpfw. III tanks and 8 Sturmgeschutz assault guns built on the chassis of the Pz.Kpfw. III. The decal sheet was printed by Cartograf. Each painting scheme is depicted on a beautifully drawn color profile and described in the 20 page guidebook with English and Polish text. The selection contains the following vehicles: - Pz.Kpfw. III (Funk) Ausf. J named Strolch II from Versuchskommando (F.L.) Tropen, North Africa, September 1942, - Sturmgeschutz III Ausf. F/8 coded A and named Henni from an unidentified unit, late 1942, - Pz.Kpfw. III Ausf. J coded 100 from 1./Pz.Abt.18, Vielikiye Luki area, winter of 1942-1943, - Sturmgeschutz III Ausf. G coded 02 from Pz.Komp. (Fkl.) 314, Battle of Kursk, Russia, July 1943, - Pz.Kpfw. III Ausf. N coded R14 from staff of Pz.Rgt.25 from 7th Panzer Division, Battle of Kursk, Russia, July 1943, - Pz.Kpfw. III Ausf. M coded 24 from staff of Pz.Rgt. Grossdeutschland, Eastern Front, summer 1943, - Sturmgeschutz III Ausf. F/8 coded 35 from III./Pz.Rgt. HG of Fallschirm-Panzer-Division 1. Hermann Goring, Sicily, July-August 1943, - Pz.Kpfw. III Ausf. J/L coded 234 from 2./Pz.Rgt.33 Prinz Eugen of 9th Panzer Division, Bryansk area, August 1943, - Sturmgeschutz III Ausf. G coded 943 from 9./Pz.Rgt.24, northern Italy, September 1943, - Sturmgeschutz III Ausf. G coded 10 from Stug.Abt.237 attached to the 18th Panzergrenadier Division, vehicle of the 1. Battery CO, Hptm. Bodo Spranz, Yelnya, Russia, October 1943, - Pz.Kpfw. III Ausf. N coded 301 of the CO of Panzer-Sicherungs-Kompanie 3, Oblt. Karl-Friedrich Bohn; Slovenia-Croatia, October-November 1943, - Sturmgeschutz III Ausf. G from StuG.Abt.270 attached to Ski.Jag.Brig.1, Germany, winter of 1943-44, - Panzerbeobachtungswagen III Ausf. F/G coded 2701 from an unidentified unit, Eastern Front, 1944, - Pz.Kpfw. III Ausf. N coded 211 from Pz.Abt.208, northern Italy, August 1944, - Sturmgeschutz III Ausf. F/8 coded 001 from Pz.Jg.Abt.61, 11th Panzer Division, France, September 1944, - Sturmgeschutz III Ausf. G coded 223 and named Elsa/Nelly from Pz.Jg.Abt.346, 346th Infantry Division, Holland, May 1945.REVIEWS What makes this as a book for modellers though is that a large sheet of transfers are included, with the markings needed for all 16 subjects featured in the book, and they are done in 1/35, 1/48 and 1/72 all on the one sheet. So enough to attract any AFV modeller no matter what your preferred scale (or if you are like me, then all three!). The transfers are printed by Cartogrpah so you know they are of good quality. Among the vehicles featured in, just to give a guide, there are a Pz III Ausf J in North Africa, in a unit equipped with demolition vehicles; a Stug III Ausf G and a Pz III Ausf N at Kursk; a Stug III F/8 from the Herman Goring Div in Sicily in 1943; along with others on the Eastern Front, in Italy, France and Holland providing a good selection of the different theatres where these well used vehicles saw service.Overall this is of course a little book for Pz III fans in particular, and with such good quality artwork and transfers, it should attract a keen following.Military Modelling.co

Panzer III at War, 1939–1945

Panzer III at War, 1939–1945

With comprehensive captions and text this superb book is the latest in the best selling Images of War Series and the second instalment of the Authors pictorial history of the German Panzers in the Second World War. The Panzer III saw almost continuous action from the the annexation of Czechoslovakia, the invasion of Poland and then France and the Low countries, in North Africa, Italy, the Eastern Front and, finally, the retreat back into Germany. Between 1936 and 1945, many thousands of Panzer IIIs were built. It quickly demonstrated its superiority on the battlefield and, for most of the war, remained a match for its opponents heavy tanks.The superb collection of images show how these formidable tanks were adapted and up-gunned to face the ever increasing enemy threat. The expert commentary describes how the Germans carefully utilized all available reserves and resources into building numerous production variants and how they coped on the battlefield. This is a splendid description of the one of the Nazis foremost fighting machines and a worthy successor volume to the acclaimed Panzer IV at War.

Working Paper

Working Paper


Barbarossa

The First 7 Days

Barbarossa

On 22 June 1941 The Germans launched their long-expected invasion of the Soviet Union. Codenamed Operation Barbarossa, after the famous 12th century crusading emperor, what followed was perhaps the greatest clash of arms the world has ever witnessed. With the aid of specially commissioned maps, Barbarossa: The First 7 Days describes the dramatic history of the first week of the invasion of the Soviet Union. The book begins with an extensive overview of the Wehrmacht's success up until 1941, followed by chapters outlining the German High Command's plan of attack and the defensive dispositions of the Soviet forces. The author goes on to describe the opening bombardment, followed by detailed accounts of the three Army Groups' fortunes in the first week of the campaign. The book finishes with an analysis of the remainder of the campaign and the ultimate failure of the Germans to destroy the Red Army and capture Moscow. With first hand accounts from both sides, vivid photographs, detailed fact boxes, and specially commissioned maps of the German advance and the Soviet defensive actions, Barbarossa: The First 7 Days is a comprehensive examination of the first week of the four-year war on the Eastern Front.

Descendants of Joannes Kohel and Related Families (Auclair, Ferguson, Grube, Hörz and Panzer)

Descendants of Joannes Kohel and Related Families (Auclair, Ferguson, Grube, Hörz and Panzer)

Joannes Kohel was born in 1663 in Bohemia. He had one known son, Jacobus Kohel (1684-1762). Jacobus married twice and had six children. Descendant, Joseph Kohel, was born 2 December 1807 in Kauth, Bohemia. He married twice and had ten children. He emigrated and settled in Wisconsin. Descendants and relatives lived mainly in Bohemia and Wisconsin. Includes Greskoviak, Stoflet and related families.