Public Private Partnerships in Education

New Actors and Modes of Governance in a Globalizing World

Public Private Partnerships in Education

'Far from simply being a form of cost sharing between the "state" and the "market," PPP has been celebrated by some, and condemned by others, as the champion of change in the new millennium. This book has been written by the best minds in education policy, political economy, and development studies. They convincingly argue that public private partnership represents a new mode of governance that ranges from covert support of the private sector (vouchers, subsidies) to overt collaboration with corporate actors in the rapidly growing education industry. The analyses are simply brilliant and indispensable for understanding how and why this particular best/worst practice went global.' – Gita Steiner-Khamsi, Columbia University, New York, US This insightful book brings together both academics and researchers from a variety of international organizations and aid agencies to explore the complexities of public private partnerships (PPPs) as a resurgent, hybrid mode of educational governance that operates across scales, from the community to the global. The contributors expertly study the different types of partnership arrangements and thoroughly critique the value of PPPs. Some chapters explore how PPPs, as a policy idea, have been constructed in transnational agendas for educational development and circulated globally, whilst other chapters explores the role and implications of PPPs in developing countries, providing arguments for and against an expanding reliance on PPPs in national educational systems. The theoretical framing of the book draws upon leading theories of international relations to develop a unique perspective on the global governance of education. It will prove insightful for both scholars and policymakers in public policy and education.

The Role and Impact of Public-private Partnerships in Education

The Role and Impact of Public-private Partnerships in Education

The book offers an overview of international examples, studies, and guidelines on how to create successful partnerships in education. PPPs can facilitate service delivery and lead to additional financing for the education sector as well as expanding equitable access and improving learning outcomes.

Public-Private Partnerships in Education

Lessons Learned from the Punjab Education Foundation

Public-Private Partnerships in Education

Impoverished children living in the remote rural areas and urban slums of Pakistan are not well served by the country's struggling public school system. To provide an alternative, the provincial government of Punjab revitalized the Punjab Education Foundation (PEF), which works with private schools located in poor communities throughout the province. Through these public–private partnerships (PPPs), the PEF provides school funding, teacher training, and vouchers allowing needy children to attend participating private schools for free. As a result, students at these private schools have shown strong gains in academic assessment tests, and the foundation's programs have already been replicated elsewhere in the country. This report examines a number of aspects of the PEF experience with the design and implementation of PPPs in the education sector. It begins by providing an overview of the governance structure of the PEF, and then outlines the design of, and trends in, its various programs, including the flagship Foundation Assisted Schools Program. The report concludes with a brief discussion of the lessons that can be drawn from the PEF's experience with education PPPs.

Public-Private Partnerships in ADB Education Lending, 2000-2009

Public-Private Partnerships in ADB Education Lending, 2000-2009

Education is a concern for all, including students, parents, communities, employers,societies, and governments. All stakeholders have a role in providing education services. In this context, the Asian Development Bank’s (ADB) operations in the education sector pursue new and innovative models of education service delivery and financing.Public–private partnerships (PPPs) can contribute to improving the quality and relevance of education, and to raising the cost efficiency of education delivery, including to disadvantaged groups. This report provides a review of PPP models supported by ADB-financed education sector projects in the past decade. It is part of broader analytical work being conducted by ADB on PPPs in education that will guide education sector operations in the coming years.

PPP Paradox

Promise and Perils of Public-Private Partnership in Education

PPP Paradox

Public–private partnerships have been in use for a long time, and in many countries, to build roads and bridges, clean rivers, and manage waste. In the last two decades, they have slowly begun to make their presence felt in the field of public education. Several countries, including the United States and India, have recently enacted laws that include partnerships with private entities as a vehicle for education reform. PPP Paradox discusses a swathe of PPPs in education and assesses their approach and contribution to genuine school change. This broad and even-handed survey of a variety of policy positions is followed by specific accounts of reform efforts in two case studies—one from a partnership in middle-school change in curriculum and instruction that took place in the state of Michigan in the United States, and the other from a partnership to bring Montessori education to government-run schools in Chennai, a large Indian city.

Hearing on Public/private Partnerships in Older Americans Act Programs

Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Human Resources of the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, Hearing Held in Washington, DC, May 27, 1993

Hearing on Public/private Partnerships in Older Americans Act Programs


Emerging Evidence on Vouchers and Faith-based Providers in Education

Case Studies from Africa, Latin America, and Asia

Emerging Evidence on Vouchers and Faith-based Providers in Education

While public-private partnerships in education in the United States have received a lot of attention, research on such partnerships elsewhere has been limited--even though such partnerships have been steadily gaining prominence, particularly in developing countries. Aiming to fill this gap, this book presents fresh, technically sound empirical evidence on the effectiveness and cost of various public-private education partnerships from around the world, including voucher programs and faith-based schools. The evidence on the impact in terms of school performance, targeting, and cost of public-priv.

Exploring Public-Private Partnerships in Singapore

The Success-Failure Continuum

Exploring Public-Private Partnerships in Singapore

This book looks at what drives effective management of public-private partnerships (PPPs). It examines widely cited Singaporean cases pertaining to successful PPPs as well as those in failure (and subsequently contracted back in the public-sector provision) in diverse areas of public service, such as water services, educational services, trade and logistical data services, residential services, acquisition and maintenance of military systems, research and development services, infrastructure, and sport services. The book begins each case with an overview (e.g., project goals (motivators), types of PPPs, stakeholders, time period, assigned budget, and capital planning) and then specifically discusses critical success factors and/or risk factors pertaining to the decisions to proceed with ongoing PPPs or to return to self-operation (in-house public production) of services later, respectively. The book concludes with a discussion of lessons learned from Singaporean cases and contexts of PPPs and suggests more feasible strategies and conditions toward successful collaborative governance between public agencies and private counterparts for the new century. This book will appeal especially to public policymakers.