Providence Lost

Paul Lay narrates in entertaining but always rigorous fashion the story of England's first and only experiment with republican government: he brings the febrile world of Oliver Cromwell's Protectorate to life, providing vivid portraits of ...

Providence Lost

'A compelling and wry narrative of one of the most intellectually thrilling eras of British history' Guardian. ***************** England, 1651. Oliver Cromwell has defeated his royalist opponents in two civil wars, executed the Stuart king Charles I, laid waste to Ireland, and crushed the late king's son and his Scottish allies. He is master of Britain and Ireland. But Parliament, divided between moderates, republicans and Puritans of uncompromisingly millenarian hue, is faction-ridden and disputatious. By the end of 1653, Cromwell has become 'Lord Protector'. Seeking dragons for an elect Protestant nation to slay, he launches an ambitious 'Western Design' against Spain's empire in the New World. When an amphibious assault on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola in 1655 proves a disaster, a shaken Cromwell is convinced that God is punishing England for its sinfulness. But the imposition of the rule of the Major-Generals – bureaucrats with a penchant for closing alehouses – backfires spectacularly. Sectarianism and fundamentalism run riot. Radicals and royalists join together in conspiracy. The only way out seems to be a return to a Parliament presided over by a king. But will Cromwell accept the crown? Paul Lay narrates in entertaining but always rigorous fashion the story of England's first and only experiment with republican government: he brings the febrile world of Oliver Cromwell's Protectorate to life, providing vivid portraits of the extraordinary individuals who inhabited it and capturing its dissonant cacophony of political and religious voices. ***************** Reviews: 'Briskly paced and elegantly written, Providence Lost provides us with a first-class ticket to this Cromwellian world of achievement, paradox and contradiction. Few guides take us so directly, or so sympathetically, into the imaginative worlds of that tumultuous decade' John Adamson, The Times. 'Providence Lost is a learned, lucid, wry and compelling narrative of the 1650s as well as a sensitive portrayal of a man unravelled by providence' Jessie Childs, Guardian.

Providence Lost

Put in Taylor's terms, my thesis is that the “loss” of providence from our
contemporary social imaginary brings with it a new precariousness in the “
buffered” self of modernity. Providence Lost tracks a succession of shifts in the
history of ideas of ...

Providence Lost

In our ever more secular times—is providence lost? Perhaps, but as Lloyd makes clear, providence still exerts a powerful influence on our thought and in our lives. This book traces a succession of transformations in the concept of providence through the history of Western philosophy.

Lost Providence

David Brussat. epilogue PrOvIdenCe LOST, PrOvIdenCe regAIned The purpose
of the D-1 District is to encourage and direct development in the downtown to
ensure that: new development is compatible with the existing historic building
fabric ...

Lost Providence

Providence has one of the nation's most intact historic downtowns and is one of America's most beautiful cities. The history of architectural change in the city is one of lost buildings, urban renewal plans and challenges to preservation. The Narragansett Hotel, a lost city icon, hosted many famous guests and was demolished in 1960. The American classical renaissance expressed itself in the Providence National Bank, tragically demolished in 2005. Urban renewal plans such as the Downtown Providence plan and the College Hill plan threatened the city in the mid-twentieth century. Providence eventually embraced its heritage through plans like the River Relocation Project that revitalized the city's waterfront and the Downcity Plan that revitalized its downtown. Author David Brussat chronicles the trials and triumphs of Providence's urban development.

Knights of the Golden Sun

Along with glorious art and epic storytelling, this collection includes a behind-the-scenes look at the process of bringing this story to life.

Knights of the Golden Sun

Four hundred years separate the Old Testament from the New Testament, and during that time, neither man nor angel could hear God's divine message. In his absence, an age of chaos began. With humanity at the wayside, a power struggle erupts among the Archangels over who will control Father's throne.Knights of the Golden Sun Vol. 1: Providence Lost collects all seven issues of the hit series from Mad Cave in a gorgeous trade paperback. Along with glorious art and epic storytelling, this collection includes a behind-the-scenes look at the process of bringing this story to life.

Hockey in Providence

In the postseason , Providence lost in the qualifying series round to the St . John '
s Maple Leafs two games to none . The P - Bruins captured their third division title
in 2002 – 2003 with a 44 - 25 - 11 record . New coach Mike Sullivan was ...

Hockey in Providence

Providence has an old and rich hockey tradition. The Providence Reds were one of the first professional hockey teams in the United States. In their 51-year history (1926-1977), the Reds won seven playoff championships, including four Calder Cup titles. The Reds were the first minor-league hockey team to operate for 50 seasons. The Providence Bruins, established in the 1992-1993 season, carry on the city's great hockey legacy and gave Providence its fifth Calder Cup title. Several Hockey Hall of Famers have played for Providence-based teams, including Bobby Bauer, Hector "Toe" Blake, Johnny Bower, Frank Brimsek, Eddie Giacomin, Rod Langway, Milt Schmidt, and Lorne "Gump" Worsley.

Monthly Nautical Magazine and Quarterly Review

J. J. Taylor, reported missing since August last, sailed from New Orleans for
Savannah. Cincinnatus, sprung aleak when within 5 miles of Thacher's Island, in
a heavy blow, December 22d, filled and sank. Argo, Baltimore, for Providence,
lost ...

Monthly Nautical Magazine  and Quarterly Review


Lost Restaurants of Providence

Downcity Diner offered a famous meatloaf, and Ming Garden's Ming Wings were a staple for regulars. Author David Norton Stone details the restaurants that still hold a place in the hearts of locals.

Lost Restaurants of Providence

In the city that invented the diner, so many amazing restaurants remain only in memories. The Silver Top had fresh coffee every twenty minutes, and the Ever Ready was hot dog heaven. Miss Dutton's Green Room and the Shepard Tea Room beckoned shoppers in their Sunday finest. At Childs, the griddle chef made butter cakes in the window for night owls, and Harry Houdini supped at midnight with H.P. Lovecraft at the Waldorf Lunch. Themed lounges like the Beachcomber and the Bacchante Room chased away the Prohibition blues. Downcity Diner offered a famous meatloaf, and Ming Garden's Ming Wings were a staple for regulars. Author David Norton Stone details the restaurants that still hold a place in the hearts of locals.

Service and Style

Providence lost 16 percent of its population in the 1950s, leading the nation in
what would become a widespread trend in the next ... Boston saw the collapse of
its old veteran, R. H. White, in 1957, and Providence lost the Boston Store in
1958.

Service and Style

Downtown department stores were once the heart and soul of America's pulsing Broadways and Main Streets. With names such as City of Paris, Penn Traffic, The Maze, Maison Blanche, or The Popular, they suggested spheres far beyond mundane shopping. Nicknames reflected the affection customers felt for their favorites, whether Woodie's, Wanny's, Stek's, O.T.'s, Herp's, or Bam's. The history of downtown department stores is as fascinating as their names and as diverse as their merchandise. Their stories encompass many themes: the rise of decorative design, new career paths for women, the growth of consumerism, and the technological ingenuity of escalators and pneumatic tubes. Just as the big stores made up their own small universes, their stories are microcosmic narratives of American culture and society. The big stores were much more than mere businesses. They were local institutions where shoppers could listen to concerts, see fashion shows and art exhibits, learn golf or bridge, pay electric bills, and plan vacations – all while their children played in the store's nursery under the eye of a uniformed nursemaid. From Boston to San Diego and Miami to Seattle, department stores symbolized a city's spirit, wealth, and progressiveness. Situated at busy intersections, they occupied the largest and finest downtown buildings, and their massive corner clocks became popular meeting places. Their locations became the epicenters of commerce, the high point from which downtown property taxes were calculated. Spanning the late 19th century well into the 20th, their peak development mirrors the growth of cities and of industrial America when both were robust and flourishing. The time may be gone when children accompany their mothers downtown for a day of shopping and lunch in the tea room, when monogrammed trucks deliver purchases for free the very same day, and when the personality of a city or town can be read in its big stores. But they are far from forgotten and they still have power to influence how we shop today. Service and Style recreates the days of downtown department stores in their prime, from the 1890s through the 1960s. Exploring in detail the wide range of merchandise they sold, particularly style goods such as clothing and home furnishings, it examines how they displayed, promoted, and sometimes produced goods. It reveals how the stores grew, why they declined, and how they responded to and shaped the society around them.

Medical Malpractice in Nineteenth Century America

Religious attitudes continued to evolve through the nineteenth century as the
notion of providence lost its grip on the American mind. Providence was replaced
by a secularized, optimistic view of the merits and promise of material and social
 ...

Medical Malpractice in Nineteenth Century America

Highly readable . . . . interdisciplinary history of a high order. -- The Historian Well-written and superbly documented . . . . Both physicians and lawyers will find this book useful and fascinating. -- Journal of the American Medical Association This is the first book-length historical study of medical malpractice in 19th-century America and it is exceedingly well done . . . . The author reveals that, beginning in the 1840s, Americans began to initiate malpractice lawsuits against their physicians and surgeons. Among the reasons for this development were the decline in the belief in divine providence, increased competition between physicians and medical sects, and advances in medical science that led to unrealistically high expectations of the ability of physicians to cure . . . . This book is well written, often entertaining and witty, and is historically accurate, based on the best secondary, as well as primary sources from the time period. Highly recommended. -- Choice Adept at not only traditional historical research but also cultural studies, the author treats the reader to an intriguing discussion of how 19th-century Americans came truly to see their bodies differently . . . . a sophisticated new standard in the field of malpractice history. -- The Journal of the Early Republic By far the best compilation and analysis of early medical malpractice cases I have seen . . . . this excellently crafted study is bound to be of interest to a large number of readers. -- James C. Mohr, author of Abortion in America: The Origins and Evolution of a National Policy

The Conflict of Religions in the Early Roman Empire

... all the fine and true words the Stoics spoke of Providence lost their meaning for
ordinary men who thought quickly. The religious teachers of the day laid hold of
the old paradoxes of the school and with them demolished the Stoic Providence.

The Conflict of Religions in the Early Roman Empire