Primitive Polynesian Economy

Primitive Polynesian Economy

"Primitive Polynesian Economy is one of the first serious attempts to apply the concepts of modern economic theory to the institutions of a primitive community, studied by anthropological field methods. In the small Polynesian island of Tikopia, Raymond Firth was able in the course of a year to observe and analyze in remarkable detail the economic transactions of the thirteen hundred inhabitants of a primitive peasant economy of agriculturalists and fishermen. For the second edition, he has written a new chapter discussing the changes that have taken place since the book was first published.

Politics, Law and Ritual in Tribal Society

Politics, Law and Ritual in Tribal Society

What can we learn from tribal societies about the ways in which, in a variety of social settings, groups of men resolve their conflicts with other men? In order to answer this question, Politics, Law and Ritual in Tribal Society compares nearly forty case study societies, most of them in Africa, in their reconstructed pre-colonial tribal condition, comparing their small-scale social relations to their large-scale social context. At the outset Gluckman explains to the reader that custom is the focus of interest of all types of anthropology. Yet his approach manifests a strong interest in economy, politics, and social relationships.In the volume, Max Gluckman offers a succinct version of a lifetime of opinionated analysis. This material is organized by theme and the ethnographic examples appear as brief illustrations of theoretical questions. Discussed here also is the relation between disputes and struggles for power within the context of mechanisms of social control and stability.In addition, Gluckman presents a step-by-step survey of the cumulative development of the anthropological analysis of tribal institutions, from the nineteenth century to the present, and supports the argument that anthropology is a science rather than an art. The new masterful introduction by Sally Falk Moore, along with a new postscript of Gluckman's professional activities and publications, provides newcomers to the work of Gluckman with deep insights into the contents as well as contexts within which the great anthropologist worked.

Social Change in Tikopia

Re-study of a Polynesian community after a generation

Social Change in Tikopia

Re-visiting Tikopia a decade after his first visit, Raymond Firth here examines what impact the forces of modernization had on Tikopia society with regard to economics, law, politics and social affairs. Suffering a famine whilst there, the author also examined the issues of responsibility for the famine; problems of distribution in ceremonial and ritual; institutional developments from the famine. Originally published in 1959.

Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology

Samuel Beckett and the Cultural Politics of the Modern Novel

Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology

Designed as a reader for courses, this anthology presents an array of theories and interpretations in the field of modern cultural anthropology. It provides a deeper understanding of the major theoretical orientations which have historically guided and currently guide anthropological research.

Pacific Art

Persistence, Change, and Meaning

Pacific Art

Collection of essays documenting the state of research about Pacific art written by authors and specialists in the field interesting to students, artists, collectors, curators etc.

Collapse

How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed: Revised Edition

Collapse

In Jared Diamond’s follow-up to the Pulitzer-Prize winning Guns, Germs and Steel, the author explores how climate change, the population explosion and political discord create the conditions for the collapse of civilization Environmental damage, climate change, globalization, rapid population growth, and unwise political choices were all factors in the demise of societies around the world, but some found solutions and persisted. As in Guns, Germs, and Steel, Diamond traces the fundamental pattern of catastrophe, and weaves an all-encompassing global thesis through a series of fascinating historical-cultural narratives. Collapse moves from the Polynesian cultures on Easter Island to the flourishing American civilizations of the Anasazi and the Maya and finally to the doomed Viking colony on Greenland. Similar problems face us today and have already brought disaster to Rwanda and Haiti, even as China and Australia are trying to cope in innovative ways. Despite our own society’s apparently inexhaustible wealth and unrivaled political power, ominous warning signs have begun to emerge even in ecologically robust areas like Montana. Brilliant, illuminating, and immensely absorbing, Collapse is destined to take its place as one of the essential books of our time, raising the urgent question: How can our world best avoid committing ecological suicide? From the Trade Paperback edition.

Food Nations

Selling Taste in Consumer Societies

Food Nations

This original collection abandons culinary nostalgia and the cataloguing of regional cuisines to examine the role of food and food marketing in constructing culture, consumer behavior, and national identity.

Tithe as Gift

The Institution in the Pentateuch and in Light of Mauss's Prestation Theory

Tithe as Gift

This work studies the biblical tithe from anthropological and theological perspectives. It explores tithe as gift rather than tax, the latter being the common interpretation to date.

The Human Group

The Human Group

Published in 1998, The Human Group is a valuable contribution to the field of Sociology and Social Policy.