Practical Pedagogy for Library Instructors

17 Innovative Strategies to Improve Student Learning

Practical Pedagogy for Library Instructors

This work gathers 17 case studies using instructional methodologies framed by sound pedagogical theory. The cases covered include the broad spectrum of education from behavioural to cognitive to constructivist.

Using LibGuides to Enhance Library Services

A LITA Guide

Using LibGuides to Enhance Library Services

The easy-to-use tools in Springshare’s LibGuides help you organize webpages, improve students’ research experience and learning, and offer an online community of librarians sharing their work and ideas. Editors Dobbs, Sittler, and Cook have recruited expert contributors to address specific applications, creating a one-stop reference. Readers will be able to create subject guides that achieve the full potential of LibGuides with advice on such topics as Learning from the best—a showcase of 28 LibGuides with exceptional design and pedagogy Collaborating with faculty to embed LibGuides in course management systems Creating a customized look to your LibGuides with design flair and enhanced functionality Getting ready for smart-phone users with a plan for the mobile web Setting up Google Analytics on a LibGuide site Teaching with LibGuides

Handbook of Distance Education

Second Edition

Handbook of Distance Education

The third edition of this award-winning Handbook continues the mission of its predecessors: to provide a comprehensive compendium of research in all aspects of distance education, arguably the most significant development in education over the past three decades. While the book deals with education that uses technology, the focus is on teaching and learning and how its management can be facilitated through technology. Key features include: Comprehensive coverage that includes all aspects of distance education, including design, instruction, management, policy, and a section on different audiences. Chapter authors frame their topic in terms of empirical research (past and present) and discuss the nature of current practice in terms of that research. Future research needs are discussed in relation to both confirmed practice and recent changes in the field. Section one provides a unique review of the theories that support distance education pedagogy. Section six includes a unique review of distance education as a component of global culture. This book will be of interest to anyone engaged in distance education at any level. It is also appropriate for corporate and government trainers and for administrators and policy makers in all these environments. Recipient of the 2013 IAP Distance Education Book Award

Library and Information Science

A Guide to Key Literature and Sources

Library and Information Science

This unique annotated bibliography is a complete, up-to-date guide to sources of information on library science, covering recent books, monographs, periodicals and websites, and selected works of historical importance. In addition to compiling an invaluable list of sources, Bemis digs deeper, examining the strengths and weaknesses of key works. A boon to researchers and practitioners alike, this bibliography Includes coverage of subjects as diverse and vital as the history of librarianship, its development as a profession, the ethics of information science, cataloging, reference work, and library architecture Encompasses encyclopedias, dictionaries, directories, photographic surveys, statistical publications, and numerous electronic sources, all categorized by subject Offers appendixes detailing leading professional organizations and publishers of library and information science literature This comprehensive bibliography of English-language resources on librarianship, the only one of its kind, will prove invaluable to scholars, students, and anyone working in the field.

Information Literacy Efforts Benchmarks, 2013 Edition

Information Literacy Efforts Benchmarks, 2013 Edition

This 115-page study presents data from 60 North American colleges and universities about their academic library and institutional information literacy efforts. The study helps librarians and others to answer questions such as: What are staffing and staff time use trends in information literacy? How many more or fewer students will take information literacy oriented classes and sessions this year as compared to last year? What software packages are favored for producing info literacy tutorials? How do instructors rate the information literacy skills of their students, before and after training? What is the role of information literacy testing? What about trends in information literacy assistance to faculty? What is the role of information literacy presentations at student orientations? What is the relationship like between library information literacy faculty and key academic departments? What percentage of colleges have formal information literacy requirements and what are these requirements? This is just a small sample of topic coverage.

Finding History

Research Methods and Resources for Students and Scholars

Finding History

In today’s world of modern research methods, the irony is that even though more materials are readily available now than ever before, this proliferation of sources has actually made the process more difficult for the novice researcher. In addition, today’s professors expect high-quality sources to be used in students’ undergraduate research precisely because so much information is available; however, without instruction, many students are not even aware of the standard history sources that they should be using routinely for history research projects. Finding History is a practical and modern guide to research for history projects, helping to sort through the available resources and technology for students, scholars, and librarians. Finding History includes practical, step-by-step instructions for discovering historical evidence using library catalogs, databases, and websites. It simplifies and clarifies the research process so that students new to the experience may locate appropriate research material with the same skill as seasoned historians. This book addresses the information literacy skills defined by the American Library Association and the American Historical Association, which include recognizing the need for scholarly historical information; defining and identifying the need for primary, secondary, and tertiary sources; knowing what finding tools are available to help locate historical sources; using history research tools efficiently and effectively; learning research vocabulary as well as the vocabulary of the historical profession; making evaluative judgments about the scholarly value of materials once they are located; physically acquiring research materials; using research material effectively to support a thesis or argument; and using research material ethically and responsibly. Including search samples and tables, Finding History is a valuable resource for anyone wanting to ensure their research draws from the best available sources and those needing instruction in locating, obtaining, evaluating, and using scholarly sources efficiently, directly, and ethically.

The Online Teaching Survival Guide

Simple and Practical Pedagogical Tips

The Online Teaching Survival Guide

The Online Teaching Survival Guide offers faculty a wide array of theory-based techniques designed for online teaching and technology-enhanced courses. Written by two pioneers in distance education, this guidebook presents practical instructional strategies spread out over a four-phase timeline that covers the lifespan of a course. The book includes information on a range of topics such as course management, social presence, community building, and assessment. Based on traditional pedagogical theory, The Online Teaching Survival Guide integrates the latest research in cognitive processing and learning outcomes. Faculty with little knowledge of educational theory and those well versed in pedagogy will find this resource essential for developing their online teaching skills. Praise for The Online Teaching Survival Guide "At a time when resources for training faculty to teach online are scarce, Judith Boettcher and Rita-Marie Conrad have presented a must-read for all instructors new to online teaching. By tying best practices to the natural rhythms of a course as it unfolds, instructors will know what to do when and what to expect. The book is a life raft in what can be perceived as turbulent and uncharted waters." —Rena M. Palloff and Keith Pratt, program directors and faculty, Teaching in the Virtual Classroom Program, Fielding Graduate University "Developed from years of experience supporting online faculty, Judith Boettcher and Rita-Marie Conrad's book provides practical tips and checklists that should especially help those new to online teaching hit the ground running." —Karen Swan, Stukel Distinguished Professor of Educational Leadership, University of Illinois Springfield "This book blends a fine synthesis of research findings with plenty of practical advice. This book should be especially valuable for faculty teaching their first or second course online. But any instructor, no matter how experienced, is likely to find valuable insights and techniques." —Stephen C. Ehrmann, director, Flashlight Program for the Study and Improvement of Educational Uses of Technology; vice president, The Teaching, Learning, and Technology Group

Teaching First-Year College Students

A Practical Guide for Librarians

Teaching First-Year College Students

This book takes a comprehensive look at first-year library instruction from examining why first-year students struggle with academic assignments to exploring instruction roles at different institutions. It offers step-by-step guidance for planning, teaching, and assessing first-year students in and beyond the library instruction classroom.