Peter Pan

in Kensington Gardens

Peter Pan

Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens is a novel by J. M. Barrie, illustrated by Arthur Rackham, and published by Hodder & Stoughton in late November or early December 1906; it is one of four major literary works by Barrie featuring the widely known literary character he created, Peter Pan. The story of this book is set in Kensington Gardens, one of the London Royal Parks, mostly after "Lock-Out Time", described by Barrie as the time at the end of the day when the park gates are closed to the public. After this time the fairies, and other magical inhabitants of the park, can move about more freely than during the daylight, when they must hide from ordinary people. (Source: Wikipedia)

Peter Pan and Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens

Peter Pan and Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens

When Peter Pan flies through the nursery window and invites Wendy, John and Michael to come to Never-Never-Land, they set off on the adventure of a lifetime. Prepare to be enchanted by J.M. Barrie's much-loved tale of Lost Boys, mermaids, pirates, and a boy who will never grow up. This edition also contains another Peter Pan story, Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens, and features original illustrations by Francis D. Bedford and Arthur Rackham.

Peter Pan In Kensington Gardens (Illustrated & Annotated Edition)

Peter Pan In Kensington Gardens (Illustrated & Annotated Edition)

J. M. Barrie tells the first adventures of Peter Pan in the form of a fairy story, settles the first questions of children in regard to their advent into the world, by picturing a pre-existence on an island in fairyland. Barrie's observation of life is so thoroughly that of the artist that there is about ten times as much imagery in the book as in the average child's story. The illustrations by Arthur Rackham are no less genuinely artistic.

Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens - Illustrated by Arthur Rackham

Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens - Illustrated by Arthur Rackham

Peter Pan and Wendy, or Peter Pan; The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up is J. M. Barrie’s most famous work. It first appeared in the form of a play, in 1904, and was later transformed into a novel ­– written in 1911. Both versions tell the story of Peter Pan, a mischievous little boy who can fly, and his adventures on the island of Neverland with Wendy Darling and her brothers, the fairy Tinker Bell, the Lost Boys, and the pirate Captain Hook. Over a century after its initial publication it remains loved and appreciated, by adults and children alike. The work is accompanied throughout by a series of dazzling colour and black and white illustrations – by a master of the craft; Arthur Rackham (1867-1939). One of the most celebrated painters of the British Golden Age of Illustration (which encompassed the years from 1850 until the start of the First World War), Rackham’s artistry is quite simply, unparalleled. Throughout his career, he developed a unique style, combining haunting humour with dream-like romance. Presented alongside the text, his illustrations further refine and elucidate this carefully collated anthology.

Peter Pan

Peter Pan

Take flight with Peter Pan and Tinkerbell on the adventure of a lifetime. Join them as they set off, together with the Darling children, for the magical world of Neverland. Presented with new illustrations by Leire Salaberria, J. M. Barrie's classic tale of Lost Boys, mermaids, pirates, and a boy who will never grow up will enchant readers of all ages. This unabridged edition also contains an additional story, Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens.

Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens

Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens

J M Barrie's most famous character, Peter Pan, originated in a whimsical story from his book The Little White Bird. Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens is a revised version of that same story, and the Peter Pan we meet is a younger, slightly different character to the Peter Pan of Barrie's later, better-known works. Peter is a small boy who is, like all boys, part bird. When he hears his future being discussed he flies out the window and away to Kensington Gardens. There he discovers that he is now more boy than bird, and so he is stranded in the park, unable to fly any longer.

Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens

Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens

Trajectory presents classics of world literature with 21st century features! Our original-text editions include the following visual enhancements to foster a deeper understanding of the work: Word Clouds at the start of each chapter highlight important words. Word, sentence, paragraph counts, and reading time help readers and teachers determine chapter complexity. Co-occurrence graphs depict character-to-character interactions as well character to place interactions. Sentiment indexes identify positive and negative trends in mood within each chapter. Frequency graphs help display the impact this book has had on popular culture since its original date of publication. Use Trajectory analytics to deepen comprehension, to provide a focus for discussions and writing assignments, and to engage new readers with some of the greatest stories ever told. "Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens" by J.M. Barrie is a children's story about Peter Pan's adventure in the Kensington Gardens in London. As a child, Peter Pan flew out of his bedroom window and lived with the birds and fairies in the Kensington Gardens.

Peter Pan

Peter Pan

'All children, except one, grow up.' Peter Pan originally appeared as a baby living a magical life among birds and fairies in J.M. Barrie's sequence of stories, Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens. His later role as flying boy hero of Neverland was brought to the stage by Barrie's play Peter Pan (1904), which was transformed into the novel Peter and Wendy in 1911. In a narrative filled with vivid characters, epic battles, pirates, fairies, and fantastic imagination, Peter Pan's adventures capture the spirit of childhood and of rebellion against the role of adulthood in conventional society. This edition includes the novel and the stories, and reproduces the original illustrations by Francis Donkin Bedford and Arthur Rackham. In his introduction, Jack Zipes sifts through the psychological interpretations that have engaged critics, explores the cultural and literary contexts in which we can appreciate Barrie's enduring creation, and shows why Peter Pan is fundamentally a work that urges adults to reconnect with their own imagination.