Norman Bates - Psycho!

Mother!

Norman Bates - Psycho!

Norman Bates was the villain of Robert Bloch's 1959 novel Psycho, portrayed by Anthony Perkins in the 1960 film of the same name directed by Alfred Hitchcock and its sequels. The character was inspired by Wisconsin murderer Ed Gein and Calvin Beck, publisher of 'Castle of Frankenstein'.

Psycho! - Norman Bates

Psycho! - Norman Bates

Norman Bates, illustrated biography.

Norman Bates Snarky Coloring Book

A Killer from Psycho

Norman Bates Snarky Coloring Book

Norman Bates is a fictional character created by American author Robert Bloch as the main antagonist in his 1959 thriller novel Psycho.

Psycho

Behind the Scenes of the Classic Thriller

Psycho

The Bates Motel. The ominous house on the hill. The shower. . . . Few movies have proven as enduringly fascinating to audiences, film buffs, and moviemakers as Hitchcock's horrific 1960 shocker Psycho. This book offers the complete, colorful account of the production, shooting, and aftermath of this mesmerizing, electrifying film. 50 photos.

Horror Films of the 1980s

Horror Films of the 1980s

John Kenneth Muir is back! This time, the author of the acclaimed Horror Films of the 1970s turns his attention to 300 films from the 1980s. From horror franchises like Friday the 13th and Hellraiser to obscurities like The Children and The Boogens, Muir is our informative guide. Muir introduces the scope of the decade’s horrors, and offers a history that draws parallels between current events and the nightmares unfolding on cinema screens. Each of the 300 films is discussed with detailed credits, a brief synopsis, a critical commentary, and where applicable, notes on the film’s legacy beyond the 80s. Also included is the author’s ranking of the 15 best horror films of the 80s.

In the Name of National Security

Hitchcock, Homophobia, and the Political Construction of Gender in Postwar America

In the Name of National Security

In the Name of National Security exposes the ways in which the films of Alfred Hitchcock, in conjunction with liberal intellectuals and political figures of the 1950s, fostered homophobia so as to politicize issues of gender in the United States. As Corber shows, throughout the 1950s a cast of mind known as the Cold War consensus prevailed in the United States. Promoted by Cold War liberals--that is, liberals who wanted to perserve the legacies of the New Deal but also wished to separate liberalism from a Communist-dominated cultural politics--this consensus was grounded in the perceived threat that Communists, lesbians, and homosexuals posed to national security. Through an analysis of the films of Alfred Hitchcock, combined with new research on the historical context in which these films were produced, Corber shows how Cold War liberals tried to contain the increasing heterogeneity of American society by linking questions of gender and sexual identity directly to issues of national security, a strategic move that the films of Hitchcock both legitimated and at times undermined. Drawing on psychoanalytic and Marxist theory, Corber looks at such films as Rear Window, Strangers on a Train, and Psycho to show how Hitchcock manipulated viewers' attachments and identifications to foster and reinforce the relationship between homophobia and national security issues. A revisionary account of Hitchcock's major works, In the Name of National Security is also of great interest for what it reveals about the construction of political "reality" in American history.

Screening Violence 1

Screening Violence 1

Following the release in 1967 of "Bonnie and Clyde" and "The Dirty Dozen", violence has been seen as a defining feature of the modern film. Is it art or exploitation? Danger or liberation? This volume provides an exmination of the history and effects of graphic violence on film.

Remaking Horror

Hollywood's New Reliance on Scares of Old

Remaking Horror

"Remaking Horror chronicles the American horror genre in its development of remake titles from the 1930s to 21st century films. Staple horror franchises are highlighted along with counterparts to illustrate the genre has embraced remake productions and what the future of horror holds for American cinema. More than 25 films, remakes, and the movies they influenced are presented"--

Must We Kill the Thing We Love?

Emersonian Perfectionism and the Films of Alfred Hitchcock

Must We Kill the Thing We Love?

William Rothman argues that the driving force of Hitchcock's work was his struggle to reconcile the dark vision of his favorite Oscar Wilde quote, "Each man kills the thing he loves," with the quintessentially American philosophy, articulated in Emerson's writings, that gave classical Hollywood movies of the New Deal era their extraordinary combination of popularity and artistic seriousness. A Hitchcock thriller could be a comedy of remarriage or a melodrama of an unknown woman, both Emersonian genres, except for the murderous villain and godlike author, Hitchcock, who pulls the villain's strings—and ours. Because Hitchcock believed that the camera has a murderous aspect, the question "What if anything justifies killing?," which every Hitchcock film engages, was for him a disturbing question about his own art. Tracing the trajectory of Hitchcock's career, Rothman discerns a progression in the films' meditations on murder and artistic creation. This progression culminates in Marnie (1964), Hitchcock's most controversial film, in which Hitchcock overcame his ambivalence and fully embraced the Emersonian worldview he had always also resisted. Reading key Emerson passages with the degree of attention he accords to Hitchcock sequences, Rothman discovers surprising affinities between Hitchcock's way of thinking cinematically and the philosophical way of thinking Emerson's essays exemplify. He finds that the terms in which Emerson thought about reality, about our "flux of moods," about what it is within us that never changes, about freedom, about America, about reading, about writing, and about thinking are remarkably pertinent to our experience of films and to thinking and writing about them. He also reflects on the implications of this discovery, not only for Hitchcock scholarship but also for film criticism in general.

Psycho, The Birds and Halloween

The Intimacy of Terror in Three Classic Films

Psycho, The Birds and Halloween

Horror films come in a wide variety of styles and subject matter. Three of the most intimate explorations of terror are examined in this study. Intimate in terms of settings (small towns and an isolated motel) and in the emotional links between the characters and the terrors they face. In Psycho, Norman Bates is a darker reflection of his victim Marion Crane and her lover Sam Loomis. They share frustrations, fears and compulsions, albeit at different levels of intensity. In The Birds, Melanie Daniels and her new acquaintances in Bodega Bay share emotional problems which can impel them to act in destructive ways that are echoed, and then overwhelmed by violence from the natural world. Halloween features a monster, Michael Myers, who has more in common with one of his victims, heroine Laurie Strode, than is evident at first glance. Beyond the link between normality and the violently aberrant, all three films give glimpses of emotional intimacy that is threatened and sometimes tragically destroyed by horror.