Nordic Experiences of Sustainable Planning

Policy and Practice

Nordic Experiences of Sustainable Planning

For well over a decade, there has been a drive towards sustainability in planning throughout the Nordic countries. But are these countries experiencing a paradigm shift in planning research and practice with regards to sustainability? Or is the sustainability discourse leading them into an impasse in planning? This book includes overviews of the planning systems in the five Nordic countries, drawing attention to their increasing focus on sustainability. A leading team of scholars from the fields of planning, urban design, architecture, landscape, economics, real estate and tourism explore how the notion of sustainability has shaped planning research in the Nordic countries. Case studies from Iceland, Sweden, Finland, Norway and Denmark shed light on what lessons can be learned and some possible future developments. By focusing on the actual settings and practices of local and regional planning activities, it enables a discussion on the current state of planning for a more sustainable future. This book will be valuable reading for students and academics interested in planning policy, environmental policy, architecture and urban design work.

Sustainable Consumption, Promise or Myth? Case Studies from the Field

Sustainable Consumption, Promise or Myth? Case Studies from the Field

This book brings together a number of recent case studies from the broad field of sustainable consumption. As they evaluate the promises, myths, and critiques of sustainable consumption, these essays can also be categorized into a range of different societal perspectives, from the individual to collectivities. The first chapters explore the personal consumer, discussing how individual consumptive choices relate to lifestyle and culture, and how choices are reflected in the carbon footprints of consumers and vehicles like the automobile. The ongoing phenomenon of outsourcing production and thus the emissions of cities—in more affluent countries—and the resulting “low-carbon illusion” of cities is analysed, as is the inefficiency of density policies to mitigate these emissions. The volume then moves on to consider community-based resource sharing, environmental entrepreneurs, spillover effects and learning possibilities. Also investigated are intentional communities born of alternative economic thought, suburban neighborhoods, and questions of whether cultural activities can be considered within the field of sustainability in lower-income city outskirts. The third part of the book analyzes different social movements in sustainability, as well as the limits of policy, government regulation, and the potential for mainstreaming sustainable consumption. In each chapter, scholars explore sustainability, from the individual to the collective, in order to improve understandings of consumer lifestyles and provide critiques of the processes of societal transition toward more sustainable human-environmental life.

Bicycle Urbanism

Reimagining Bicycle Friendly Cities

Bicycle Urbanism

Over recent decades, bicycling has received renewed interest as a means of improving transportation through crowded cities, improving personal health, and reducing environmental impacts associated with travel. Much of the discussion surrounding cycling has focused on bicycle facility design—how to best repurpose road infrastructure to accommodate bicycling. While part of the discussion has touched on culture, such as how to make bicycling a larger part of daily life, city design and planning have been sorely missing from consideration. Whilst interdisciplinary in its scope, this book takes a primarily planning approach to examining active transportation, and especially bicycling, in urban areas. The volume examines the land use aspects of the city—not just the streetscape. Illustrated using a range of case studies from the USA, Canada, and Australia, the volume provides a comprehensive overview of key topics of concern around cycling in the city including: imagining the future of bicycle-friendly cities; integrating bicycling into urban planning and design; the effects of bike use on health and environment; policies for developing bicycle infrastructure and programs; best practices in bicycle facility design and implementation; advances in technology, and economic contributions.

Sustainability and the Design of Transport Interchanges

Sustainability and the Design of Transport Interchanges

The interchange is a new form of transport building which integrates into a single whole various modes of public transport, putting the passenger first (rather than the infrastructure). This book presents design principles for transport interchanges and offers analysis of best practice in the UK and abroad. The author demonstrates how this complex new building type integrates with the city, on the one hand, and with different types of transport on the other. In this integration design in both plan and section are important, as is urban and landscape design. The idea of ‘interchange’ is increasingly relevant as town planners, engineers and architects address the question of sustainable development with its emphasis on energy efficiency, social cohesion, access for the elderly, and urban regeneration.

Have a "good Participation"

Recommendations on Public Participation in Forestry Based on Literature Review and Nordic Experiences

Have a

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Marine Spatial Planning in the Nordic Region

Principles, Perspectives and Opportunities: Outcomes from the Nordic Forum on MPAs in Marine Spatial Planning

Marine Spatial Planning in the Nordic Region


Ecotourism in Scandinavia

Lessons in Theory and Practice

Ecotourism in Scandinavia

Ideal for researchers and students of ecotourism, this text comprehensively describes, analyses and evaluates aspects of Scandanavian ecotourism.