My Mother was Nuts

A Hollywood icon discusses her incredible life, from her starring role on the classic sitcom Laverne and Shirley to her trailblazing moment as the first woman to direct a movie grossing more than $100 million at the box office.

My Mother was Nuts

A Hollywood icon discusses her incredible life, from her starring role on the classic sitcom Laverne and Shirley to her trailblazing moment as the first woman to direct a movie grossing more than $100 million at the box office.

Seeking the Light

Of them, he wrote, “They were all radicals—far left of center publicly—and they
tended to be religious nuts, either ... My mother, for example, was a violent atheist
, whereas my favorite aunt—her sister—was all tied up with a religious cult in Los
 ...

Seeking the Light

Phillips and Ruth Lee Thygeson were pioneers in medical research on external diseases of the human eye. Together, this husband-and-wife team shared a mutual story of extraordinary accomplishment including, among other things, the discovery of the cause of trachoma, a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. This comprehensive biography tells the story of their personal lives and careers. Beginning with their family backgrounds, the story continues through their meeting on the campus of Stanford University, their years of practicing “frontier medicine” in rural Colorado (where they built a log cabin with their own hands), their world travels in search of a cure for trachoma, and their considerable roles in establishing the Francis I. Proctor Foundation for Research in Ophthalmology. The story of this couple is one of a lifelong collaboration in medicine, a 70-year love affair, and an unending quest to conquer preventable blindness around the world.

Vegetarian Times

mother had taken me to said there was no cure for my problem, that I would 'have
to learn to live with it.' There as no way I could hide it; it was ... Fortunately, the
family lived next door to Margaret, a "health nut." "We were living in Hazelwood, ...

Vegetarian Times

To do what no other magazine does: Deliver simple, delicious food, plus expert health and lifestyle information, that's exclusively vegetarian but wrapped in a fresh, stylish mainstream package that's inviting to all. Because while vegetarians are a great, vital, passionate niche, their healthy way of eating and the earth-friendly values it inspires appeals to an increasingly large group of Americans. VT's goal: To embrace both.

The Flaw of Love

The Planet Persists Miller's girlfriend, Lisa, and his mother, Bay, get along
swimmingly, so Lisa refuses to believe Miller when he tells her that once upon a
time his mother was nuts. “What is nuts?” Lisa says. “Nuts is in the eye of the
beholder.

The Flaw of Love

It's a Saturday morning in Brooklyn. Joel Miller, age twenty-eight, stands outside his locked bathroom door. Behind it are his girlfriend Lisa, a Dixie cup, and a pregnancy test. While she stalls for time, Miller is left in his hallway to wonder and wait: for the results of the test, for the pieces of his addled life to come together, for some kind of divine intervention to guide his actions when Lisa finally emerges. Thus begins Lauren Grodstein's beguiling debut novel, a wise, wonderfully assured journey deep into the heart of the commitmentphobic male. Awaiting test results that could determine his future, Miller finds himself replaying all he has seen of love so far. There was his father Stan's awkward balancing act between doting father and failed husband, and his mother Bay's refusal to accept that Stan was never coming back. There was his playboy friend Grant's devastation upon falling for the one woman he couldn't have. And most of all, there was Miller's own prior relationship—with Blair, the aloof beauty he can't stop thinking about, the one who got away. With past and present colliding in his hallway, Miller begins to realize just how little he really knows about intimacy, love and potential fatherhood—and more important, about what he's going to do next. Reproduction Is the Flaw of Love fearlessly charts the romantic odyssey of one endearing New York bachelor, and in so doing illuminates some universal truths about family, loyalty, devotion, and love. Previously published as Reproduction Is the Flaw of Love

My Mother Was Never A Kid

In fact it's even worse than that because I've got this outrageous secret and I can't
even tell her. Just picture if I did. She'd probably think I was nuts or a liar or just
trying to be cute and then she'd stop liking me and I couldn't bear that. I definitely
 ...

My Mother Was Never A Kid

I can't believe my mother was ever my age. I think she was born a mother.... Now that she's a teenager, Victoria Martin expects freedom, good times, and maybe even some understanding from her mother. But no such luck! She's still getting the same old lectures, the same old groundings, and the same old punishments. It's obvious her mother was never thirteen years old. Then one day, as she's on her way home to get the telling-off of her life, something very strange happens to Victoria. When she finally arrives in New York, the station looks completely different, as if she's slipped back through time. And then she meets Cici -- cool, outgoing Cici, the best friend a girl like Victoria could want. But Victoria can't help feeling like she's met her somewhere before....

A Comedian s Guide to Theology

This iswhat my mother saidsoon after my dad died, but you probably didn't know
that, because she didn't use quotation marks. After my father gave up the ghost,
my mother, ever the worrier, decided that we were aboutto go bankrupt because
ghosts no longer receive paychecks. My mother ... Because my mother was nuts.

A Comedian s Guide to Theology

Thor Ramsey (known as the Jon Stewart of the theological world) defends the essentials of the Christian faith in this volume of comedy for the thinking person. Armed with only a laptop and a rapier wit, he defends the inspiration of the Bible ("all Scripture is inspired by God"--in other words, when you tell someone off, quote the Bible), the doctrine of total depravity (calling someone out for their sins is a tricky business, especially if you don't know how to operate a bullhorn), and the supremacy of Christ (or why Thor's God is bigger than your god), along with a host of other essential doctrines of the Christian faith. Packed with funny stories and hard-hitting truths, this comprehensive collection of biblical insights and personal anecdotes will surprise readers, destroy their misconceptions, and leave them wanting more. For readers looking alternatives to the conversation of traditional faith, or those who have a taste for fearless (and hilarious) honesty, A Comedian's Guide to Theology will permanently change how we all look at Christianity--or at least offer a good-hearted shove out of the box (or back in the box, if that's where you need to be).

The Splendid Things We Planned A Family Portrait

Beyond my friend's blurred profile—staring straight ahead—I saw Scott mount the
stairs of a mudcolored stucco building that looked ... In short I was doing great,
just great, at least when you considered that my brother was nuts, my mother had
 ...

The Splendid Things We Planned  A Family Portrait

A National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist 'Autobiography' The renowned biographer’s unforgettable portrait of a family in ruins—his own. Meet the Baileys: Burck, a prosperous lawyer once voted the American Legion’s “Citizen of the Year” in his tiny hometown of Vinita, Oklahoma; his wife Marlies, who longs to recapture her festive life in Greenwich Village as a fetching young German immigrant, fresh off the boat; their addled son Scott, who repeatedly crashes the family Porsche; and Blake, the younger son, trying to find a way through the storm. “You’re gonna be just like me,” a drunken Scott taunts him. “You’re gonna be worse.” Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award and finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, Blake Bailey has been hailed as “addictively readable” (New York Times) and praised for his ability to capture lives “compellingly and in harrowing detail” (Time). The Splendid Things We Planned is his darkly funny account of growing up in the shadow of an erratic and increasingly dangerous brother, an exhilarating and sometimes harrowing story that culminates in one unforgettable Christmas.

Tell the Wolves I m Home

We were all sitting in the living room when the doorbell rang. It was a Saturday
morning and we were expecting him, the man from the Whitney. My mother ... He
carried a black briefcase and like my mother predicted, he thought we were nuts.

Tell the Wolves I m Home

There's only one person who has ever truly understood fourteen-year-old June Elbus, and that's her uncle, the renowned painter, Finn Weiss. Shy at school and distant from her once inseparable older sister, June can only be herself in Finn's company; he is her godfather, confident, and best friend. So when he dies far too young of a mysterious illness that June’s mother can barely bring herself to discuss, June's world is turned upside down. At the funeral, she notices a strange man lingering just beyond the crowd, and a few days later, June receives a package in the mail. Inside is a beautiful teapot she recognizes from Finn's apartment, and a note from Toby, the stranger, asking for an opportunity to meet. A the two begin to spend time together, June realises she's not the only one who misses Finn, and if she can bring herself to trust this unexpected friend, he might just be the one she needs the most. Tell the Wolves I'm Home is a tender story of love lost and found, an unforgettable portrait of the way compassion can make us whole again.

The Mortal Groove

It was insane.” Randy watched his daughter go through a silent reassessment. “
That makes sense.” “I was so angry all the time. People were ... when Larry and
Delavon came to Waldo to visit me, my mother told us to sleep in the basement.

The Mortal Groove

Ellen Hart was named the 2017 MWA Grand Master, the most distinguished lifetime achievement award offered in the mystery community. Minneapolis restaurateur and amateur sleuth Jane Lawless is in the middle of ringing in the New Year the best way she knows how—with her family, friends, and some excellent champagne—when the biggest financial backers in Minnesota politics break up the party with a little backroom proposition for her father: How'd he like to be the state's next governor? Flattered, Ray Lawless, a retired defense attorney, agrees to run, and the latecomer's sprint to the state capital is going great until reporters and opponents start digging up the kind of dirt that is more valuable than gold out on the campaign trail. He and his family are fair game, but worse than that, so are the men running his campaign. Their secrets, involving the mysterious death of a young woman, have been buried since the summer they all came home from Vietnam. Unfortunately for Jane and her father, those secrets won't stay that way for long. The Mortal Groove, the newest addition to Lambda and Minnesota Book Award--winning author Ellen Hart's multilayered Jane Lawless series, is a haunting tale of dark secrets that is sure to satisfy.

Thirteen and a Day

I asked Carole if her family thought she was nuts. “I think my mother does,” she
said. “She would never say it. But yeah. Not for being Jewish, but the level of
observance. Most of the Shabbat restrictions—she thinks that's nuts. I mean, she
said ...

Thirteen and a Day

A striking look at the Jewish rite-and at American Jews in all their diversity Since its emergence here a century ago, the bar or bat mitzvah has become a distinctively American rite of passage, so much so that, in certain suburbs today, gentile families throw parties for their thirteen-year-olds, lest they feel left out. How did this come about? To answer that question, Mark Oppenheimer set out across America to attend the most distinctive b'nai mitzvah he could find, and Thirteen and a Day is the story of what he found- an altogether fresh look at American Jews today. Beginning with the image of a party of gaudy excess, Oppenheimer then goes farther afield in the great tradition of literary journalists from Joseph Mitchell to Ian Frazier and Susan Orlean. The two dozen Jews of Fayetteville, Arkansas, he finds, open their synagogue to eccentrics from all over the Ozarks. Those of Lake Charles, Louisiana, pass the hat to cover the expenses of their potluck dinner. And in Anchorage, Alaska, a Hasidic boy's bar mitzvah in a snowed-in hotel becomes a striking image of how far the Jewish diaspora has spread. In these people's company, privy to their soul-searching about their religious heritage, Oppenheimer finds that the day is full of wonder and significance. Part travelogue, part spiritual voyage, Thirteen and a Day is a lyrical, entertaining, even revelatory look at American Jews and one of the most original books of literary journalism to appear in some years.