My First Tennis Book

My First Tennis Book

A child's first introduction to sports Game on! Perfect for parents to share with their toddlers, this simple board book introduces kids to very basic vocabulary associated with a favorite sport. The contemporary design features one word per page, a nice big photo, and a diverse selection of children in the pictures. Plus, the cover is appealingly tactile, with deep embossing and eye-catching spot gloss. Kids will grab hold of it again and again. Racket. Net. Volley. Tennis comes alive in this fun introduction to the sport. Featuring 20 first words ranging from "forehand" and "rally" to "lob" and "OUT!" this colorful, photographic board book is ACES.

Tennis:Cultural History

Tennis:Cultural History

Supported by a startling wealth of linguistic and documentary research, Gillmeister charts the global evolution of tennis from its origins in the early Middle Ages to the appearance of the modern game in the 20th century. Along the way, he debunks established myths about the history of the game, including those surrounding the invention of the Davis Cup. 136 illustrations, 16 in color.

The First Beautiful Game

Stories of Obsession in Real Tennis

The First Beautiful Game


Tennis Science for Tennis Players

Tennis Science for Tennis Players

How does your opponent put that tricky spin on the ball? Why are some serves easier to return than others? The mysteries behind the winning strokes, equipment, and surfaces of the game of tennis are accessibly explained by Howard Brody through the laws of physics. And he gives practical pointers to ways players can use this understanding to advantage in the game. Through extensive laboratory testing and computer modeling, Brody has investigated the physics behind the shape of the tennis racket, the string pattern, the bounce of the tennis ball, the ways a particular court surface can determine the speed of the game, and the many other physical factors involved in tennis.

Sports

the first five millennia

Sports

From ancient Egyptian archery and medieval Japanese football to contemporary American baseball, every sport has been shaped by--and in turn has helped shape--the culture of which it is a part. Yet as Allen Guttmann shows in this far-ranging study, for all their differences sports throughout the ages have exhibited many common characteristics. They have always been a domain for the cultivation of gender roles, for example, as well as for the enactment of class and ethnic identities. They have also followed a similar historical trajectory from traditional to modern forms. Written in entertaining, accessible prose and illustrated with dozens of images, Sports: The First Five Millennia traces this evolution across continents, cultures, and historical epochs to present a single comprehensive narrative of the world's sports. Beginning with a discussion of what constitutes a sport--and what does not--Guttmann explores the vast variety of sports played by the preliterate peoples of the Americas and Africa, by the Greeks and Romans of antiquity, and in premodern China and Japan as well as in Islamic Asia and medieval Europe. These traditional sports include everything from Cherokee stickball and Chinese kit-flying to Persian wrestling and English bearbaiting. Guttmann then turns his attention to modern sports, an invention of eighteenth-century England that spread throughout the world during the nineteenth century and became institutionalized during the twentieth. Marked by an adherence to codified rules and increasingly governed by international organizations such as the Federation Internationale de Football Association and the International Olympic Committee, modern sports have all butdisplaced their traditional antecedents throughout the world. The book concludes with a look at how skateboarding, hang gliding, and other "postmodern" sports have resisted the transition from spontaneous play to institutionalized

Japanese Sports

A History

Japanese Sports

In this first synthetic, comprehensive survey of Japanese sports in English, the authors are attentive to the complex and fascinating interaction of traditional and modern elements. In the course of tracing the emergence and development of sumo, the martial arts, and other traditional sports from their origins to the present, they demonstrate that some cherished ancient traditions were, in fact, invented less than a century ago. They also register their skepticism about the use of the samurai tradition to explain Japan's success in sports. Special attention is given to Meiji-era Japan's frequently ambivalent adoption and adaptation of European and American sports--a particularly telling example of Japan's love-hate relationship with the West. The book goes on the describe the history of physical education in the school system, the emergence of amateur and professional leagues, the involvement of business and the media in sports promotion, and Japan's participation in the Olympics. Japanese Sports Trivia Quiz (openli)Japan's first professional baseball team was founded in 1921. When were the Central and Pacific Leagues established? a. 1930; b. 1940; c. 1950; d. 1960 (openli)Oh Sadaharu hit 51 home runs in 1973 and 49 in 1974. How many did he hit in his lifetime? a. 597; b. 602; c. 755; d. 868 (openli)Sugiura Tadashi pitched 42 games for the Nankai Hawks in 1959 and won 38. How many games did he pitch and win against the Yomiuri Giants in the Japan Series that same year? a. 1; b. 2; c. 3; d. 4 (openli)The first Japanese radio broadcast of an entire sports event occurred at the national middle-school baseball tournament at Koshien Stadium in 1927, with a Ministry of Communication censor standing by since the script couldn't be approved in advance. The national middle-school tournament was suspended in 1941. When was it resumed? a. 1945; b. 1946; c. 1947; d. 1948 (openli)In 1791 Shogun Tokugawa Ienari observed a new ring-entering ceremony similar to that now performed by yokozuna. When did the Sumo Association officially recognize the rank of yokozuna? a. 1789; b. 1890; c. 1909; d. 1951 (openli)Which famous sumo rikishi won 69 successive bouts over the course of 7 tournaments, the longest winning streak ever recorded? a. Futabayama (Sadaji); b. Wakanohana (Kanji); c. Taiho (Koki); d. Chiyonofuji (Mitsugu) (openli)When the first karate dojo was established in Okinawa in 1889, the characters for karate were written 'Chinese hand'. When were they first written 'empty hand'? a. 1889; b. 1922; c. 1929; d. 1935 (openli)Only one major school of aikido holds competitive tournaments. When did the name aikido first appear on the list of government-sanctioned martial arts. a. 1883; b. 1890; c. 1931; d. 1942 (openli)In 1951 Tanaka Shigeki became the first Japanese runner to win the Boston Marathon. When was the first Fukuoka Marathon held? a. 1927; b. 1937; c. 1947; d. 1957 (openli)At the infamous 1936 Nazi Olympics in Berlin, Japanese athletes won gold medals in track and field, swimming, and diving. In what event did a Korean win the gold for Japan? a. marathon; b. triple jump; c. pole vau Answers: 1. c. (the Pacific League was the expansion league); 2. d. (Japanese ballparks are shorter than U.S. parks, but the season is also shorter); 3. d. (his arm never recovered from that year); 4. b.; 5. c. (the rank yokozuna first appeared on the banzuke ratings in 1890; and the first solo ring-entering ceremonies by wrestlers wearing the yokozuna rope was in 1789); 6. a.; 7. c. (by members of Keio's karate club who were impressed by a Zen priest of the Rinzai sect); 8. d. (its founder Ueshiba Morihei was born in 1883); 9. c. (the year after the first footrace around Lake Biwa); 10. a.

African-American Sports Greats

A Biographical Dictionary

African-American Sports Greats

Presents personal and professional profiles of over one hundred sixty African American athletes representing eleven sports

Never Make the First Offer

(Except When You Should) Wisdom from a Master Dealmaker

Never Make the First Offer

"On a handshake, I've trusted Donald Dell with my life." -Arthur Ashe, U.S. Open champion Good negotiators know the rules. Great negotiators know when to break those rules. And then there are the true master dealmakers, like the pioneering sports lawyer Donald Dell. Over the last four decades, he has fought for some of the biggest stars in the world-Michael Jordan, Jimmy Connors, Patrick Ewing, Andy Roddick, Stan Smith, and dozens of others. Dell is tough enough to look the general manager of the L.A. Lakers in the eye and say, "We can talk about the weather or the movies or your sex life, whatever you want, but we're not going any further until you make an opening offer." On the other hand, he's shrewd enough to know when the managing partner of the Chicago Bulls was about to lowball Michael Jordan by $40 million-unless Dell could grab the advantage by naming his number first. Now Dell reveals the advanced strategies and tactics that he has developed over a lifetime of high-stakes deals. Whether you're making endorsement deals for superstars, negotiating your next salary, or just trying to sell your old car, Dell's wisdom will help you get every possible advantage.

Sports on Television

The How and Why Behind What You See

Sports on Television

In Sports on Television, Dennis Deninger provides an all-encompassing view of the sports television industry. He progresses from the need for this book, to the history of the industry and discipline, to the pioneering events of sports broadcasting and sports television, to a nuts-and bolts, behind-the-scenes look at a sports television production. All the while, he examines the impact that sports and the mass media have had (and are continuing to have) on one another and on society.

Cash and Carry

The Spectacular Rise and Hard Fall of C.C. Pyle, America’s First Sports Agent

Cash and Carry

C.C.“Cash and Carry” Pyle made several fortunes representing professional football and tennis players—before losing everything and disappearing into history’s dustbin. This work reevaluates Pyle’s fast life and times while analyzing his extraordinary and enduring legacy. In 1925, Pyle rocked the sports world by inducing Red Grange to abandon the leafy confines of the University of Illinois for pro football, in essence thumbing his nose at protesting academics who insisted the move would irreparably harm both the college game and Grange’s career. The book continues through all of Pyle’s successes, and more than a few of his failures, including his signing of controversial French tennis star Suzanne Lenglen and his near-bankruptcy following losses incurred staging the short-lived annual Bunion Derby, as newspaper columnists dubbed the notorious 3,470-mile transcontinental footrace first held in 1928.