Metal complexes in cancer chemotherapy

Metal complexes in cancer chemotherapy

This book presents a critical overview of the present status of metal complexes in cancer chemotherapy. Interdisciplinary in approach, the book covers both clinical and experimental aspects of the subject. Topics treated in depth include: - synthesis of metal complexes for cancer chemotherapy - metal complexes in clinical and preclinical trials - the mechanism of action of tumour-inhibiting metal complexes Oncologists and internists as well as researchers and students in organic chemistry, coordination chemistry, biochemistry and biology will find this up-to-date monograph highly valuable in their daily work.

Platinum and Other Metal Coordination Compounds in Cancer Chemotherapy 2

Platinum and Other Metal Coordination Compounds in Cancer Chemotherapy 2

The 7th International Symposium on Platinum and other metal coordination compounds in Cancer Chemotherapy, ISPCC '95, organized by the European Cancer Centre, was held in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, March 1-4, 1995. As with previous ISPCC meetings, the goal of ISPCC '95 was to bring together c1inicians, clinical investigators, scientists, and laboratory workers from many disciplines to promote further collaboration and cooperation in the development of new platinum and other metal coordination compounds as weil as in new ways to use 'c1assical' drugs as cisplatin and carboplatin in the treatment of cancer. Important aspects addressed by experts in the field inc1uded the synthesis and activity of new platinum compounds, the biochemistry and molecular pharrnacology as weil as the c1inical pharrnacology of this c1ass of antineoplastic agents, an overview of current c1inical studies, one special minisymposium on the mechanisms of cell kill of platinum, and one on resistance against platinum compounds. Finally, the current status of development of nonplatinum metal complexes was discussed. This volume contains the contributions of the various speakers at ISPCC '95 and provides an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of this important c1ass of anticancer agents, ranging from synthesis and molecular pharrnacology on one hand to c1inical pharrnacology and cIinical investigations on the other hand. The Organizing Corrunittee and Editors wish to express their gratitude to the contributors to this volume, to the various organizations and pharrnaceutical companies for their generous sponsoring of ISPCC '95, and to the Plenum Publishing Company for their help in producing this volume.

Ruthenium and Other Non-Platinum Metal Complexes in Cancer Chemotherapy

Ruthenium and Other Non-Platinum Metal Complexes in Cancer Chemotherapy

With contributions by numerous experts

Platinum Coordination Complexes in Cancer Chemotherapy

Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on Platinum Coordination Complexes in Cancer Chemotherapy convened in Burlington, Vermont by the Vermont Regional Cancer Center and the Norris Cotton Cancer Center, June 22–24, 1983

Platinum Coordination Complexes in Cancer Chemotherapy

The idea for convening a Fourth International Symposium on Platinum Coordination Complexes in Cancer Chemotherapy was born in an assembly of researchers from the Vermont Regional Cancer Center and the Norris Cotton Cancer Center who shared a common interest in metal complexes. It was agreed by those assembled that sufficient time had passed since the Third International Symposium on Platinum Coor dination Complexes in Cancer Chemotherapy held in 1976 at the Wadley Institutes of Molecular Medicine in Dallas, Texas, during which several advances in the chemistry, biochemistry, pharmacology and clinical use of platinum complexes had occurred, to warrant a fourth symposium. Furthermore, intensive investigations in progress were bringing sophisticated methodologies to bear on the problems in the field, clinical trials were yielding interesting results, and unique approaches to cancer therapy were being designed. Therefore, an organizing committee was formed and planning culminated in the symposium which was held in Burlington, Vermont, June 22-24, 1983.

Platinum Coordination Complexes in Cancer Chemotherapy

Platinum Coordination Complexes in Cancer Chemotherapy

It was a great pleasure and honour to have been invited to attend this Seminar and to present a final impression. The association in this field between the Chester Beatty Research Institute and Dr. Rosenberg's School at East Lansing is something which I specially value and many would doubtless like to know how it came about. In the course of its work in carcinogenesis and on chemotherapy over many years, the Chester Beatty Research Institute was frequently drawn to the importance of many metals - as for example lead, iron, metalloid arsenic and the metalloid quali ties of the carcinogenic hydrocarbons. Interest started in platinum many years ago, following the possibility, c1aimed by others, that various complexes between the metal and mercaptopurine might possess significant chemotherapeutic properties. Va rious attempts to confirm such findings ended, however, in complete failure. Interest in platinum was revived by the fresh observations of Dr. Rosenberg and his collea gues, and here the outcome was entirely different. Very soon it was possible to con firm the intense growth-inhibitory properties of cis-platinum (II) diamminedi chloride and related substances. After communicating these results to Dr. Rosenberg, it was a pleasure to welcome hirn in London where he gave a Seminar which greatly engaged the interest of many of the staff. Later, several of these were to enjoy Dr. Rosenberg's hospitality at an international conference on the subject to be held in East Lansing, where many rapidly developing aspects were open for discussion.

Transition Metal Complexes as Drugs and Chemotherapeutic Agents

Transition Metal Complexes as Drugs and Chemotherapeutic Agents

When this book was first conceived as a project the expanding interest in the clinical use of platinum and gold complexes made a survey of the relevant biological properties of metal complexes timely and appropriate. This timeliness has not diminished during the gestation and final publica tion of the manuscript. The introduction contains an explanation of the layout and approach to the book, which I wrote as an overall survey of the wide variety of biological properties of metal complexes. Hopefully, the reader will see the parallels in mechanisms and behavior, even in different organisms. The writing was considerably helped by the enthusiasm and confidence (totally unearned on my part) in the project of Professor Brian James and lowe him my special thanks. I also owe a great debt of gratitude to my colleagues, and especially to Eucler Paniago, of the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, for their comprehension and for the initial leave of absence which allowed me to begin the project. To those who read some or all of the manuscript and made suggestions, Bernhard Lippert, Kirsten Skov, and Tom Tritton, as well as the editor's reviewer I am also grateful. As usual, the final responsibility for errors or otherwise rests with the author.

Cisplatin

Current Status and New Developments

Cisplatin

Cisplatin: Current Status and New Developments is a collection of papers presented at a symposium sponsored by the University of Alabama in Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Bristol Laboratories in Syracuse, ?ew York, and held on September 27-28, 1979, in Atlanta, Georgia. The symposium provided a forum for assessing developments with regards to cisplatin as an anticancer drug, with emphasis on its clinical application in a wide variety of adult and pediatric malignancies as well as the mechanism by which the drug appears to cause tumor cell death. Comprised of 39 chapters, this book begins with a preclinical overview of cisplatin, focusing on its mechanism of action, pharmacology, antitumor activity, analogs, and toxicity. The discussion then turns to the effects of cisplatin on DNA and the possible relationships to cytotoxicity and mutagenicity in mammalian cells; lethal activity of platinum compounds in combination with pyrimidine derivatives; and ultrastructural effects of cisplatin. Subsequent chapters focus on the rationale of combination chemotherapy; toxic side effects of platinum analogs; radiopharmacokinetics of cisplatin; and the use of cisplatin for the treatment of malignancies such as ovarian cancer and advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate. This monograph will be useful to oncologists and pharmacologists.

Chemoradiation in Cancer Therapy

Chemoradiation in Cancer Therapy

Internationally recognized experts in cancer biology and clinical research review the present status of the multimodality approach to the management of solid tumors and speculate on possible future strategies for chemoradiation therapy. The authors detail applications of combined modality therapy in lung, esophageal, breast, gastric, pancreatic, colon, and rectal cancers. They also show how radiation interacts with such chemotherapeutic agents as the platinum complexes, taxanes, and gemcitabine in the treatment of malignant gliomas, and head and neck cancer. A review of how to integrate new specific molecular targeted agents into multimodality therapy in the future.