Men in White Suits

Liverpool FC in the 1990s - The Players' Stories

Men in White Suits

In Men in White Suits, Simon Hughes meets some of the most colourful characters to have played for Liverpool Football Club during the 1990s. The resulting interviews, set against the historical backdrop of both the club and the city, deliver a rich portrait of life at Anfield during a decade when on-field frustrations were symptomatic of off-the-field mismanagement and ill-discipline. After the shock resignation of Dalglish and Graeme Souness's ill-fated reign, the Reds – under the stewardship of Roy Evans – displayed a breathtaking style led by a supremely talented young group of British players whose names featured as regularly on the front pages of the tabloids as they did on the back. The Daily Mail was the first newspaper to tag Evans’s team as the Spice Boys. Yet despite their flaws, this was a rare group of individuals: mavericks, playboys, goal-scorers and luckless defenders. Wearing off-white Armani suits, their confident personalities were exemplified in their pre-match walk around Wembley before the 1996 FA Cup final (a 1-0 defeat to Manchester United). In stark contrast to the media-coached, on-message interviews given by today’s top stars, the blunt, ribald and sometimes cutting recollections of the footballers featured in Men in White Suits provide a rare insight into this fascinating era in Liverpool’s long and illustrious history.

Bullet of Revenge

Bullet of Revenge

When PI Frank Hummer takes on a new case to help a woman in distress, he soon finds himself in a web of lies and deception. Ghosts from the past reach out toward him, demanding atonement for the things he committed a decade ago, things he tried hard to forget.

Ufo Testament

Anatomy of an Abductee

Ufo Testament

This book entails the life of one who has not only become internationally respected as a UFO investigator and author but now as a so-called UFO abductee. It is strikingly different from other works dealing with UFO abductions in that it will provide an overview of the complete life of an abductee from early childhood to sunset years of his life. The exciting descriptions of UFO sightings, investigations and documentation would be worthy of a book themselves. The Chief Scientific Consultant for the USAF UFO Project Bluebook, Astronomer Dr. Hynek is on record as stating: "Raymond Fowler whose meticulous and detailed investigations far exceed the investigations of Bluebook." However, this book is about much more than investigating UFO sightings. Throughout the warp and weft of the author's UFO and paranormal experiences is the slow but sure realization that he has been investigated since childhood by the very phenomenon he was investigating!

UFOs

Interplanetary Visitors

UFOs

Exciting, fully documented on-site personal investigations of UFOs.

Enterprise

America's Fightingest Ship and the Men Who Helped Win World War II

Enterprise

This is the epic and heroic story of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise and of the courageous men who fought and died on her from Pearl Harbor to the end of the conflict. Acclaimed military historian Barrett Tillman recounts the World War II exploits of America’s most decorated warship and its colorful crews— tales of unmatched daring and heroism.

Boardwalk of Dreams

Atlantic City and the Fate of Urban America

Boardwalk of Dreams

During the first half of the twentieth century, Atlantic City was the nation's most popular middle-class resort--the home of the famed Boardwalk, the Miss America Pageant, and the board game Monopoly. By the late 1960s, it had become a symbol of urban decay and blight, compared by journalists to bombed-out Dresden and war-torn Beirut. Several decades and a dozen casinos later, Atlantic City is again one of America's most popular tourist spots, with thirty-five million visitors a year. Yet most stay for a mere six hours, and the highway has replaced the Boardwalk as the city's most important thoroughfare. Today the city doesn't have a single movie theater and its one supermarket is a virtual fortress protected by metal detectors and security guards. In this wide-ranging book, Bryant Simon does far more than tell a nostalgic tale of Atlantic City's rise, near death, and reincarnation. He turns the depiction of middle-class vacationers into a revealing discussion of the boundaries of public space in urban America. In the past, he argues, the public was never really about democracy, but about exclusion. During Atlantic City's heyday, African Americans were kept off the Boardwalk and away from the beaches. The overly boisterous or improperly dressed were kept out of theaters and hotel lobbies by uniformed ushers and police. The creation of Atlantic City as the "Nation's Playground" was dependent on keeping undesirables out of view unless they were pushing tourists down the Boardwalk on rickshaw-like rolling chairs or shimmying in smoky nightclubs. Desegregation overturned this racial balance in the mid-1960s, making the city's public spaces more open and democratic, too open and democratic for many middle-class Americans, who fled to suburbs and suburban-style resorts like Disneyworld. With the opening of the first casino in 1978, the urban balance once again shifted, creating twelve separate, heavily guarded, glittering casinos worlds walled off from the dilapidated houses, boarded-up businesses, and lots razed for redevelopment that never came. Tourists are deliberately kept away from the city's grim reality and its predominantly poor African American residents. Despite ten of thousands of buses and cars rolling into every day, gambling has not saved Atlantic City or returned it to its glory days. Simon's moving narrative of Atlantic City's past points to the troubling fate of urban America and the nation's cultural trajectory in the twentieth century, with broad implications for those interested in urban studies, sociology, planning, architecture, and history.

White Men Challenging Racism

35 Personal Stories

White Men Challenging Racism

Profiles thirty-five white men who have challenged society's beliefs about race, segregation, and tolerance.

Zones of Contention

Essays on Art, Institutions, Gender, and Anxiety

Zones of Contention

Addresses the questions: What might be the role of the artist in the 21st century? How essential is art to the psychic and political well-being of American society?

The Damsel Fly

And Other Stories

The Damsel Fly

A widower filches an identity and finds himself enthralled by a damselfly; a young couple on honeymoon in the Alps are lured to implacable heights; an old man, confused and alone, is adrift in the storied streets of an ancient city. Invoking a strong sense of place, Barbara Kremen explores in three stories themes of inquirers and voyeurs; the relationship of species, insect and human; the dispossession of age; and the beauties and distortions of the imagination. Novelist and critic Frank Lentricchia, the Katharine Everett Gilbert Professor of Literature and Theater Studies at Duke University, firmly places the author in the company of the small American "pantheon of unpredictably original writers." Reproductions of original collages by artist Irwin Kremen accompany the three stories.