Scotland and the Thirty Years' War

1618-1648

Scotland and the Thirty Years' War

This volume deals with the entanglement of Scotland in the Thirty Years War (1618-1648), discussing the diplomatic and military aspects of the conflict that were interwoven with the fate of the Scottish princess, Elizabeth of Bohemia, the famous Winter Queen.

Military Governors and Imperial Frontiers C. 1600-1800

A Study of Scotland and Empires

Military Governors and Imperial Frontiers C. 1600-1800

This volume examines Scots serving as governors in the empires of Denmark-Norway, Sweden, Russia, and the Atlantic and South Asian sectors of the British Empire with a view to understanding Scotland's distinctive participation within European imperialism.

Alexander Leslie and the Scottish Generals of the Thirty Years' War, 1618–1648

Alexander Leslie and the Scottish Generals of the Thirty Years' War, 1618–1648

Field Marshal Alexander Leslie was the highest ranking commander from the British Isles to serve in the Thirty Years’ War. Though Leslie’s life provides the thread that runs through this work, the authors use his story to explore the impacts of the Thirty Years’ War, the British Civil Wars and the age of Military Revolution.

Network North

Scottish Kin, Commercial And Covert Associations in Northern Europe 1603-1746

Network North

Discussing a series of economic, confessional, political and espionage networks, this volume provides an illuminating study of network history in Northern Europe in the early modern period. The empirically researched chapters advance existing 'social network theory' into accessible historical discussion.

Conflict and Soldiers' Literature in Early Modern Europe

The Reality of War

Conflict and Soldiers' Literature in Early Modern Europe

In Conflict and Soldiers' Literature in Early Modern Europe, Paul Scannell analyses the late 16th-century and early 17th-century literature of warfare through the published works of English, Welsh and Scottish soldiers. The book explores the dramatic increase in printed material on many aspects of warfare; the diversity of authors, the adaptation of existing writing traditions and the growing public interest in military affairs. There is an extensive discussion on the categorisation of soldiers, which argues that soldiers' works are under-used evidence of the developing professionalism among military leaders at various levels. Through analysis of autobiographical material, the thought process behind an individual's engagement with an army is investigated, shedding light on the relevance of significant personal factors such as religious belief and the concept of loyalty. The narratives of soldiers reveal the finer details of their experience, an enquiry that greatly assists in understanding the formidable difficulties that were faced by individuals charged with both administering an army and confronting an enemy. This book provides a reassessment of early modern warfare by viewing it from the perspective of those who experienced it directly. Paul Scannell highlights how various types of soldier viewed their commitment to war, while also considering the impact of published early modern material on domestic military capability - the 'art of war'.

Catalogue

Catalogue