Mein Kampf (Student's & Teacher's Classroom Edition)

Mein Kampf (Student's & Teacher's Classroom Edition)

"Original German-language edition published by Franz Eher & Successors LLC, Munich (National Socialist Party Printing Office) Volume One 1925, Volume two 1927 (Two-Volume-in-one edition copyright 1930)"--Page [4].

Mein Kampf

A Translation Controversy : an Analysis, Critique, and Revelation

Mein Kampf

Adolf Hitler's "Mein Kampf" has been controversial for many reasons but one of the greatest controversies has been over the mistranslations, inaccurate translations, and outright embellishments. This text reveals more than 1,000 errors in past English translations.

Thoughts & Ideas From Truckman

Thoughts & Ideas From Truckman

A collection of original articles first posted on my blog of the same title...Military and war history are discussed, as well as book reviews...Politics is a recurring theme...A sense of humor along with a grain of salt will make easier reading...This is the Fourth, and final revised edition...

Our Human Herds: The Theory of Dual Morality (Second Edition, Unabridged)

Our Human Herds: The Theory of Dual Morality (Second Edition, Unabridged)

Let us imagine that somewhere in present day South America a nation exists as the United States was constituted in 1789. George Washington is its president and Thomas Jefferson its secretary of state. It is a nation that allows only white males to vote, and its president, cabinet officials, and many of its citizens own slaves. If the America of 1789 existed right now, what would we think of it? Would it be right to invade it in order to liberate its people? Would we consider a complete embargo of it, until it changed its ways? Would it be a pariah among nations? Or would we recognize and cooperate with it, declaring its president and secretary of state political geniuses? Maybe we would just do nothing and trust that in 100 or so years it will straighten itself out? What would be the correct way to think of such a nation and its leaders? Three hundred years ago, if a woman was raped and became pregnant we’d kill the rapist and spare the baby. Today, we spare the rapist and kill the baby. One hundred years ago only heterosexual marriages were legal. Today political leaders around the world are celebrating gay relationships. How and why does our moral outlook change in such matters? By the time you are done reading this book, you will have concrete answers to these questions and many more. “This is a learned, thoroughly researched study - and dazzlingly bright. The effervescent approach to writing makes its pages fly by ... Studies as brilliant as this one deserve a far wider audience. An engrossing and mind-expanding examination of morality” ~Kirkus Reviews

Populist Discourse

Critical Approaches to Contemporary Politics

Populist Discourse

Populist Discourse brings together experts from both linguistics and political science to analyse the language of populist leaders and the media's representation of populism in different temporal, geographical and ideological contexts, including Nazi Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands, Spain, Italy, Portugal, Austria, Greece, the UK, the US and South America. With 17 contributions split into four sections, Populist Discourse covers a variety of approaches such as corpus-based discourse analysis, critical discourse analysis and political perspectives, making it a timely dissection for students and researchers working in linguistics, political science and communication.

The Impossible Exile

Stefan Zweig at the End of the World

The Impossible Exile

By the 1930s, Stefan Zweig, born to an affluent Jewish family in Vienna, had become the most widely translated living author in the world. His novels, short stories, and biographies became instant bestsellers, and his cultural patronage, his generosity, and his literary connections, were legendary. In 1934, following Hitler's rise to power, Zweig left Vienna for England, then New York, and, finally, Petrpolis, a suburb of Rio de Janeiro. With the destruction of the cultural milieu of pre-Nazi Europe, Zweig's life in exile became increasingly isolated. In 1942 he and his wife, Lotte Altmann, were found dead. They had committed suicide, just after Zweig had completed his famous autobiography, The World of Yesterday. The Impossible Exile tells the mesmerizing and tragic story of Zweig's extraordinary rise and fall, the gulf between the world of ideas in Europe and in America, and the alienation of the refugees forced into exile. Zweig embodied and witnessed the end of an era: the great Central European civilization of Vienna and Berlin.

A Seven Year Cycle Reading Plan

A Seven Year Cycle Reading Plan

Read through time, enjoying the good, the better, and the best books from each of the seven eras below: Year 1: Ancient History to 476 A.D. Year 2: The Middle Ages, 477 to 1485 A.D. Year 3: The Age of Discovery, 1485-1763 A.D. Year 4: The Age of Revolution, 1764-1848 A.D. Year 5: The Age of Empire, 1849-1914 A.D. Year 6: The American Century, 1915-1995 A.D. Year 7: The Information Age, 1996- Present Day At the end of seven years, repeat! A Seven Year Cycle Reading Plan is a booklist compiled of hundreds of books from each era in history organized into categories of interest. This volume also includes copious room for you to add your own favorite titles!

Henry Ford

Henry Ford

Most great figures in American history reveal great contradictions, and Henry Ford is no exception. He championed his workers, offering unprecedented wages, yet crushed their attempts to organize. Virulently anti-Semitic, he never employed fewer than 3,000 Jews. An outspoken pacifist, he made millions producing war materials. He urbanized the modern world, and then tried to drag it back into a romanticized rural past he'd helped to destroy. As the American auto industry struggles to reinvent itself, Vincent Curcio's timely biography offers a wealth of new insight into the man who started it all. Henry Ford not only founded Ford Motor Company but institutionalized assembly line production and, some would argue, created the American middle class. By constantly improving his product and increasing sales, Ford was able to lower the price of the automobile until it became a universal commodity. He paid his workers so well that, for the first time in history, the people who manufactured a complex industrial product could own one. This was "Fordism"--social engineering on a vast scale. But, as Curcio displays, Ford's anti-Semitism would forever stain his reputation. Hitler admired him greatly, both for his anti-Semitism and his autocratic leadership, displaying Ford's picture in his bedroom and keeping a copy of Ford's My Life and Work by his bedside. Nevertheless, Ford's economic and social initiatives, as well as his deft handling of his public image, kept his popularity high among Americans. He offered good pay, good benefits, English language classes, and employment for those who struggled to find jobs--handicapped, African-American, and female workers. Such was his popularity that in 1923, the homespun, clean-living, xenophobic Henry Ford nearly won the Republican presidential nomination. This new volume in the Lives and Legacies series explores the full impact of Ford's indisputable greatness, the deep flaws that complicate his legacy, and what he means for our own time.

The Vital Few

The Entrepreneur and American Economic Progress

The Vital Few

The Vital Few, a study of the contribution of entrepreneurs to the American economy, provides portraits of the men and women whose individual enterprise has helped to establish the character of the American businessperson and to carry our economy forward from colonial times. Examining such legendary figures as William Penn, Eli Whitney, Henry Ford, and J. Pierpont Morgan in their social and economic environment, Jonathan Hughes illuminates each period of American economic history and provides insights into the workings of American business and the special qualities required of its super-achievers. Taking into account such dramatic changes in the economy as the explosive growth of government and the puzzling effects of "stagflation," Hughes has now expanded his original volume. The new edition includes two additional biographies and a short essay on the nature of bureaucracy in both the government and the private sector. Both biographies are of "bureaucratic entrepreneurs", whose work in the federal government represents the two most prominent trends in government economics. Mary Switzer's 48-year career demonstrates the ways in which the modern welfare state has developed. First a catalyst then a major force in establishing social programs and institutions, she is in large part responsible for the existence of the American welfare state. Marriner Eccles's career, on the other hand, shows the evolution of "compensatory" fiscal and monetary policies from the New Deal to the Korean War. A self-made millionaire who was appointed to a high-level job in the federal government, Eccles quit his post after 1950, convinced that American economic policy was hopelessly inflationary and economically destructive. With these new additions, The Vital Few, long a source of inspiration and economic interest, is more accessible and useful than ever.

Hitler's Fortune

Hitler's Fortune

The true story of how Adolf Hitler amassed billions of dollars in wealth, where that money went—and who may be trying to find it for themselves. In 1918 Adolf Hitler was penniless. But within twenty-five years he was probably the richest man in Europe. In this fascinating book, Cris Whetton reveals not only the extent of Hitler’s fortune but how it was amassed and those who helped him. As Whetton demonstrates, the royalties from his book, Mein Kampf, were only a small fraction of the total fortune Hitler possessed before World War II began. Whetton delves into the finances of Hitler’s publishing company Eher Verlag, and his fund Adolf Hitler Spende, to which many people ‘voluntarily’ contributed, as well as newly uncovered evidence of two of Hitler’s personal bank accounts. Also explored is how Hitler’s personal force, magnetism, and attraction to the opposite sex also proved hugely lucrative. Hitler’s Fortune also follows what happened to the property, the funds, the art collection, and other items after the Fuhrer’s suicide in 1945, and reveals who is—and who is trying to—profit in modern times from the evil legacy of Adolf Hitler.