Medicine, Ethics, and the Third Reich

Historical and Contemporary Issues

Medicine, Ethics, and the Third Reich

Medical experimentation on human subjects during the Third Reich raises deep moral and ethical questions. This volume features prominent voices in the filed of bioethics reflecting on a wide rang of topics and issues. Amid all contemporary discussions of ethical in science, many ethicists, historians, Holocaust specialists and medical professionals strongly feel that we should understand the past in order to make more enlightened ethical decisions.

Medicine and Medical Ethics in Nazi Germany

Origins, Practices, Legacies

Medicine and Medical Ethics in Nazi Germany

The participation of German physicians in medical experiments on innocent people and mass murder is one of the most disturbing aspects of the Nazi era and the Holocaust. Six distinguished historians working in this field are addressing the critical issues raised by these murderous experiments, such as the place of the Holocaust in the larger context of eugenic and racial research, the motivation and roles of the German medical establishment, and the impact and legacy of the eugenics movements and Nazi medical practice on physicians and medicine since World War II. Based on the authors' original scholarship, these essays offer an excellent and very accessible introduction to an important and controversial subject. They are also particularly relevant in light of current controversies over the nature and application of research in human genetics and biotechnology.

Medicine and Medical Ethics in Nazi Germany

Origins, Practices, Legacies

Medicine and Medical Ethics in Nazi Germany

The participation of German physicians in medical experiments on innocent people and mass murder is one of the most disturbing aspects of the Nazi era and the Holocaust. These six essays address the critical issues raised by these experiments.

Nazi Law

From Nuremberg to Nuremberg

Nazi Law

A distinguished group of scholars from Germany, Israel and right across the United States are brought together in Nazi Law to investigate the ways in which Hitler and the Nazis used the law as a weapon, mainly against the Jews, to establish and progress their master plan for German society. The book looks at how, after assuming power in 1933, the Nazi Party manipulated the legal system and the constitution in its crusade against Communists, Jews, homosexuals, as well as Jehovah's Witnesses and other religious and racial minorities, resulting in World War II and the Holocaust. It then goes on to analyse how the law was subsequently used by the opponents of Nazism in the wake of World War Two to punish them in the war crime trials at Nuremberg. This is a valuable edited collection of interest to all scholars and students interested in Nazi Germany and the Holocaust.

Nurses and Midwives in Nazi Germany

The "Euthanasia Programs"

Nurses and Midwives in Nazi Germany

This book is about the ethics of nursing and midwifery, and how these were abrogated during the Nazi era. Nurses and midwives actively killed their patients, many of whom were disabled children and infants and patients with mental (and other) illnesses or intellectual disabilities. The book gives the facts as well as theoretical perspectives as a lens through which these crimes can be viewed. It also provides a way to teach this history to nursing and midwifery students, and, for the first time, explains the role of one of the world’s most historically prominent midwifery leaders in the Nazi crimes.

Victims and Survivors of Nazi Human Experiments

Science and Suffering in the Holocaust

Victims and Survivors of Nazi Human Experiments

While the coerced human experiments are notorious among all the atrocities under National Socialism, they have been marginalised by mainstream historians. This book seeks to remedy the marginalisation, and to place the experiments in the context of the broad history of National Socialism and the Holocaust. Paul Weindling bases this study on the reconstruction of a victim group through individual victims' life histories, and by weaving the victims' experiences collectively together in terms of different groupings, especially gender, ethnicity and religion, age, and nationality. The timing of the experiments, where they occurred, how many victims there were, and who they were, is analysed, as are hitherto under-researched aspects such as Nazi anatomy and executions. The experiments are also linked, more broadly, to major elements in the dynamic and fluid Nazi power structure and the implementation of racial policies. The approach is informed by social history from below, exploring both the rationales and motives of perpetrators, but assessing these critically in the light of victim narratives.

Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide

Killing or Caring?

Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide

A concise overview of the history and arguments surrounding euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.

Murder in Dealey Plaza

What We Know that We Didn't Know Then about the Death of JFK

Murder in Dealey Plaza

We now know vastly more about the killing of John F. Kennedy than was known 20 or 30 years ago, and new evidence is accumulating almost every day. This new evidence is being uncovered by the bold application of scientific and technological expertise to the assassination records, including the film, photographic, and autopsy records. Murder in Dealey Plaza presents the latest and best of the new assassination research. As a result of these freshly uncovered findings, it is possible to say with moral certainty and considerable scientific authority that the murder of President Kennedy was committed by a meticulously executed conspiracy which was then observed by an extensive cover-up.

Medical and Psychological Effects of Concentration Camps on Holocaust Survivors

Medical and Psychological Effects of Concentration Camps on Holocaust Survivors

This unique research bibliography is offered in honor of Leo Eitinger of Oslo, Norway. Dr. Eitinger fled to Norway in 1939, at the start of the World War II. He was caught and deported to Auschwitz, where, among others, he operated on Elie Wiesel who has written the foreword to this volume. After the war, Eitinger became a pioneering researcher on a subject from which many shied away. His contributions to understanding of the experience of massive psychological trauma have inspired others to do similar work. His many books and papers are listed in this special volume of the acclaimed bibliographic series edited by Israel W. Charny of The Institute on the Holocaust and Genocide in Jerusalem. In order to acquaint users of this bibliography with the topic, two introductory articles are offered. The first is titled "Survivors and Their Families" and deals with the impact of the Holocaust on individuals. The second, "Psychiatry and the Holocaust," examines the general impact of the Holocaust on the field of psychiatry. Robert Krell writes that in general the psychiatric literature has reflected critically on the survivor due to preconceived notions held by many mental health professionals. For many years, the exploration of victims' psychopathology obscured the remarkable adaptation made by some survivors. The problems experienced by survivors and possible approaches to treatment were entirely absent from mainstream psychiatric textbooks such as the Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Fifty years of observations about survivors of the concentration camps and other survivors of the Holocaust (in hiding, as partisans, in slave labor camps) has provided a new body of medical and psychiatric literature. This comprehensive bibliography contains a plethora of references to significant pieces of literature regarding the Holocaust and its effects on survivors. It will be of inestimable value to physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers, along with historians, sociologists, and Holocaust studies specialists.

The Medical Profession and Human Rights

Handbook for a Changing Agenda

The Medical Profession and Human Rights

Medical ethics and human rights are issues which now command much more attention both within the medical profession and in society generally than they used to. One reason is that the contexts in which doctors and other health personnel interact with the state have become more numerous. Another is that we are more conscious of patient rights in a whole variety of institutional settings. This is why the British Medical Association decided to take a thorough new look at the complex interface between medical practitioners and possible abuses of human rights.This major new BMA Report, the successor to Medicine Betrayed which looked more narrowly at torture and related practices, takes its examples from all over the world -- both the industrialised and the developing countries. It ranges widely across a great variety of issues, including ones which doctors in everyday practice are sooner or later likely to confront. It includes abuse of institutionalised patients, research involving humans, trade in organs, doctors and asylum seekers, prison doctors, forensic doctors, the rehabilitation of torture victims, and medical involvement in armed conflicts and weapons research.Throughout this Report, in whose drafting a large number of experienced doctors and other professionals have played a part, is a constant concern with the practical ethical issues such situations and contexts pose for medical personnel and guidance as to how they might deal with them. The concluding Part examines practical steps to help ensure that doctors and other health personnel are aware of these issues and are supported in their efforts to adhere to the ever higher standards of human rights observance which the modern world expects.