Mars

The Bringer of War

Mars

After an ambush in the Rings of Saturn, Junior Captain Alexis Oriana meets Mars: The Bringer of War, a strange man with exceptional abilities. Together they travel across the solar system making friends, facing threats, and exploring new worlds all while learning about the strange powers she herself possess. Join the adventure and learn the mystery that surrounds The Planets.

The planets

op. 32

The planets

Scored for large orchestral forces and a wordless chorus, this spectacular symphonic suite established Holst's international reputation as one of the most popular and important modern British composers.

Mars, the Bringer of War

Mars, the Bringer of War

John Mars is the oldest astronaut in the fleet and the commander of Challenger II. His latest assignment from NASA is a top-secret shuttle mission to the moon to investigate a mysterious signal. What he finds is an alien robot that murders his crew and destroys the source of that signal-a deep-space probe. When John returns to Earth without his crew, the probe, or any evidence of what really happened on his mission, NASA forces him into retirement. Humiliated and disgraced, John takes a job as a pilot for a commercial airline, unaware that his experience on the moon has marked him more than psychologically: in the battle to save his crew and himself, John Mars was injected with an alien tracking device. One night, while flying his regular route, John and the occupants of hisplane, including his fiance Anna, are whisked aboard a gigantic ship and thrown into deep space toward the Andromeda Galaxy-home to an Alien species called "Sels." The Sels live for one thing only, colonization of all worlds in the known universe. And now they've got their sights set on Earth. But in order to decide if Earth is a worthy adversary, the Sels have something special planned for John-a kind of alien vetting program. John, Anna and the rest of his group arrive on a Sel planet used for wargames, where alien life forms are pitted against one another-and the Sels-in death battles. One by one, John Mars' small group of survivors succumb to the Sels. But a larger problem looms for Mars-even if he can survive the Sel wargames, how could he ever get back home and warn Earth of impending invasion and assimilation into the Sel Empire?"

Holst: The Planets

Holst: The Planets

The first comprehensive guide to Holst's orchestral suite considers the music in detail and places the work in its historical context.

Masterworks of 20th-Century Music

The Modern Repertory of the Symphony Orchestra

Masterworks of 20th-Century Music

"Masterworks of 20th-Century Music" introduces more than one hundred of the greatest compositions by world-renowned composer that have entered the standard orchestral repertory. The author surveyed dozens of major American orchestras to focus on those works that an average audience member is most likely to hear. Concertgoers who are intimated by the modern repertoire finally have a single resource that will help them understand and enjoy it. Like an educated guide, he walks the listener through the piece, explaining how all the elements come together to form a unified whole. This book serves the general reader interested in 20th-century music, plus students, teachers, and scholars.

Imagining Mars

A Literary History

Imagining Mars

For centuries, the planet Mars has captivated astronomers and inspired writers of all genres. Whether imagined as the symbol of the bloody god of war, the cradle of an alien species, or a possible new home for human civilization, our closest planetary neighbor has played a central role in how we think about ourselves in the universe. From Galileo to Kim Stanley Robinson, Robert Crossley traces the history of our fascination with the red planet as it has evolved in literature both fictional and scientific. Crossley focuses specifically on the interplay between scientific discovery and literary invention, exploring how writers throughout the ages have tried to assimilate or resist new planetary knowledge. Covering texts from the 1600s to the present, from the obscure to the classic, Crossley shows how writing about Mars has reflected the desires and social controversies of each era. This astute and elegant study is perfect for science fiction fans and readers of popular science. Ebook Edition Note: The photo of Arthur C. Clarke photo on p. 209 has been redacted.

The Rock Cover Song

Culture, History, Politics

The Rock Cover Song

Cover songs operate as a form of cultural discourse across various musical genres and different societal, historical and political conditions. Case studies include a comparative analysis of Jimi Hendrix's and Whitney Houston's versions of "The Star-Spangled Banner" as well as a mapping of the trajectory of "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" from the original version by the Rolling Stones through cover versions by Otis Redding, Devo, and Britney Spears. The radical deconstruction of pop and rock songs by the Residents and Laibach is also examined, with additional studies of cover songs by such as Van Halen, Kim Wilde, Rufus Harley, the Four Tops, Pat Boone and Johnny Cash. Rather than questions of quality or how a cover song measures up as "better or worse" than other versions, this book focuses on the ideological implications and social stakes of the "same old songs" as they are reconfigured to consider, comment on and confront political issues of gender, sexuality, race, the nation-state and the generation gap.

Public Schools and The Great War

The Generation Lost

Public Schools and The Great War

In this pioneering and original book, Anthony Seldon and David Walsh study the impact that the public schools had on the conduct of the Great War, and vice versa. Drawing on fresh evidence from 200 leading public schools and other archives, they challenge the conventional wisdom that it was the public school ethos that caused needless suffering on the Western Front and elsewhere. They distinguish between the younger front-line officers with recent school experience and the older 'top brass' whose mental outlook was shaped more by military background than by memories of school.The Authors argue that, in general, the young officers' public school education imbued them with idealism, stoicism and a sense of service. While this helped them care selflessly for the men under their command in conditions of extreme danger, it resulted in their death rate being nearly twice the national average.This poignant and thought-provoking work covers not just those who made the final sacrifice, but also those who returned, andwhose lives were shattered as a result of their physical and psychological wounds. It contains a wealth of unpublished detail about public school life before and during the War, and how these establishments and the country at large coped with the devastating loss of so many of the brightest and best. Seldon and Walsh conclude that, 100 years on, public school values and character training, far from being concepts to be mocked, remain relevant and that the present generation would benefit from studying them and the example of their predecessors.Those who read Public Schools and the Great War will have their prevailing assumptions about the role and image of public schools, as popularised in Blackadder, challenged and perhaps changed.

The Royal Air Force - Volume 2

An Encyclopedia of the Inter-War Years 1930-1939

The Royal Air Force - Volume 2

Volume II of this mammoth reference work covers the years in which the League of Nations failed because of the emerging dictatorships in Germany and Italy and the expansionist policies adopted by Japan. Britain was still reeling from the consequences of World War I and the RAF was sadly far behind the other major world powers in aircraft design, still relying on bi-planes that were direct descendants of World War I thinking. It gradually became apparent that, despite UK government dithering, the RAF needed to develop new aircraft, engines and increase production to confront the bully-boy tactics of the Axis powers. As the turn of the decade approached extraordinary measures were taken to enable RAF to defend Britain's skies and this her freedom. As with Volume 1, this book covers every conceivable part of the RAF's history through these pre-War days. It looks at the development and invention of new equipment such as radar, monoplane fighters, metal construction and the heavy bomber. This was an era when science in aviation was rushing ahead and fortunately for Britain's freedom, it laid the foundations of victory in 1.945