Making Headlines

As editor-in-chief of The Australian, Chris Mitchell ran the largest stable of journalists with the largest editorial budget in the country for more than twelve years.

Making Headlines

" As editor-in-chief of The Australian, Chris Mitchell ran the largest stable of journalists with the largest editorial budget in the country for more than twelve years. This entertaining and deeply revealing book offers readers riveting insights into the quirks and foibles of some of the most powerful politicians and media executives this country has produced. A controversial figure throughout his quarter of a century as a daily editor, Chris Mitchell still maintains close regular contact with past prime ministers, editors and media CEOs. Making Headlines highlights the judgements and thinking that govern daily newspaper journalism at the highest level and the battles fought to publish tough stories about the rich and the powerful, the disenfranchised and the powerless. Making Headlines is compulsory reading for citizens who care, the political class inside the beltway and beyond, and wannabe journalists in search of a job. "

Making Headlines

Making Headlines


Making Headlines

Traces the life and achievements of the reporter/reformer who pursued a career in journalism at a time when such a career was not proper for a woman.

Making Headlines

Traces the life and achievements of the reporter/reformer who pursued a career in journalism at a time when such a career was not proper for a woman.

Making Headlines

The series provides a complete programme for junior reading intervention, and each book comes with a mini-audio disk for supporting and reinforcing children's fluency in reading.

Making Headlines

Fast Lane is a brand new reading intervention series developed for 8 to 14-year old struggling readers. It provides them with a variety of engaging, wonderfully illustrated stories and non-fiction texts which will appeal to even the most reluctant child reader.

Making Headlines

Making Headlines


Making Headlines

Making Headlines also reflects the global perspective of the war held by most Britons, who saw the conflict not only as a fight for America but also as a struggle to protect their worldwide empire as America's European allies turned the ...

Making Headlines

The War for American Independence was essentially a civil war throughout the colonies: loyalists and patriots who had grown up together as countrymen found themselves fighting on opposing sides. Troy Bickham asserts that the war proved almost as divisive in the motherland, as the British wielded the almighty pen and went to battle on the pages of the press in Britain. Surpassing the breadth of previous studies on the subject, Making Headlines offers a look at the British press as a whole—including analysis of London newspapers, provincial newspapers, and monthly magazines. The free press in Britain, Bickham argues, was too widespread and too lucrative to be susceptible to significant government interference and therefore provided in-depth coverage on all aspects of the war. Private letters, official dispatches, extracts from foreign newspapers, maps, and detailed tables of fleet strengths and locations filled the pages of daily publications that provided more extensive and more rapid information than even the government could. Due to the inexpensive and easily accessible printed news, the average British citizen was often as well informed as a cabinet minister. The open editorial nature of the press also allowed someone as socially low as a blacksmith's wife, under the cloak of anonymity, to scrutinize and offer commentary on every political decision and military maneuver, all in front of a national audience. Bickham adeptly leads the reader on an exploration into the varied national debates that raged throughout Britain during the American Revolution, one of Britain's historically most unpopular wars. The British public debated how to defeat George Washington—whose perseverance and conduct was much admired in Britain—whether captured Americans should be held as prisoners of war or hung as traitors, and the morality of including American Indians in the war effort. Making Headlines also reflects the global perspective of the war held by most Britons, who saw the conflict not only as a fight for America but also as a struggle to protect their worldwide empire as America's European allies turned the conflict into a world war, threatening even the British Isles themselves. This study will appeal to those interested in early America, the American Revolution, British history, and media studies.

Making Headlines

Making Headlines


Making Headlines

Juggling a messy personal life doesn't help, nor does the emotional impact of reporting on life's tragedies and when it all takes a toll and Rachel starts partying too hard, she finds herself making the headlines instead of reading them.

Making Headlines

Be careful what you wish for - your dream job could become your biggest nightmare. For fans of THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA and BRIDGET JONES'S DIARY. Working as a TV reporter has its challenges, but when Rachel Bentley decides to aim high and become a newsreader, she faces a whole new minefield of explosive scenarios. Rachel's path sees her pitched against egos in the newsroom, office politics and corrupt politicians, not to mention rampant sexism and a mystery stalker. Juggling a messy personal life doesn't help, nor does the emotional impact of reporting on life's tragedies and when it all takes a toll and Rachel starts partying too hard, she finds herself making the headlines instead of reading them. Will she survive a world where dreams are shattered daily and will she find the man who can help her keep her soul?

Propaganda and the Cyprus Revolt

Stubbs, 'Making Headlines in a State of Emergency', p. 70. Stubbs, 'Making
Headlines in a State of Emergency', p. 82. Stubbs, 'Making Headlines in a State
of Emergency', p. 70. Stubbs, 'Making Headlines in a State of Emergency', p. 71.

Propaganda and the Cyprus Revolt

During the EOKA period of Greek Cypriot revolt against British colonial rule, the Greek Cypriots and the British deployed propaganda as a means of swaying allegiances, both within Cyprus and on the international scene. Propaganda and the Cyprus Revolt places new emphasis on the vital role propaganda played in turning the tide against British colonial control over Cyprus. Examining the increase of violence and coercion during this period of revolt, this book examines how the opposing sides' mobilization of propaganda offered two alternative visions for the future of Cyprus that divided opinion, to the ultimate detriment of British counterinsurgency efforts. Detailing the deployment of propaganda by both parties across radio, television and print channels, the book draws upon previously unpublished archival material in order to paint a detailed picture of how the British Empire lost control over the hearts and minds of the Greek Cypriot people. This study shines new light on a crucial period of Cypriot history and contributes to wider transnational debates around the use of propaganda and the end of empire. This will be an essential read for students of Cyprus history and British colonial history.

Mark at Thirty

Mark at Thirty