Lost Voices of Cricket

Over his long career as a cricket commentator and journalist Ralph Dellor has met some of the greatest exponents of the summer game.

Lost Voices of Cricket

Over his long career as a cricket commentator and journalist, Ralph Dellor has met some of the greatest exponents of the "summer" game. In the 1990s he conducted a series of face-to-face taped interviews with famous cricketers past and present. Nine of these extraordinary interviews have now been captured in the written word. Ralph and his fellow sports journalist, Stephen Lamb, have edited and annotated the interviews so they are put into context of time and place. Each chapter is a classic piece of cricketing history, and an insight into the legends and lore of the game.

Lost Voices of The Royal Navy

hole in his head the size of a cricket ball, loosely plugged with cotton wool, a man
with both legs missing. Between them were other casualties – men
unrecognisable due to the burn dressings which covered head and body alike –
and even as ...

Lost Voices of The Royal Navy

Acclaimed historian Max Arthur pays tribute to the Royal Navy from 1914 to 1945. Drawing on the personal stories of those who have served during this period, he has created a unique narrative history of the senior service. FORGOTTEN VOICES: THE ROYAL NAVY is a memorable and moving testament to the courage, spirit, skill and irrepressible humour of those who served in the Royal Navy during these crucial years.

Lost Voices of Egypt

Nevertheless, various depictions of the deity can be seen with crossed bows,
called idan, as well as a representation of the beetle or cricket, called idian in Efik
. In each case, the letter d is present in the name of the deity, who was venerated
as ...

Lost Voices of Egypt

This book attempts to offer some insights into an area of West Africa, that can help take the wonders of Ancient Egypt out of the realm of myths and folklore. The credit belongs to the Ancient Egyptians who had managed to keep extensive records of their history and achievements which spanned an exceptionally long period. Anang, Efik and Ibibio peoples also can be recognized, for maintaining a spoken language that has not changed very much from that spoken by the Ancient Egyptians at the various stages of their development, including a very unique culture that allows for uncomplicated linkage of these two domains .What can be gleaned from these attributes can present some formidable questions for the present, as far as could relate to our understanding of the genesis of the three main "Middle Eastern" religious movements, and the evolution of aspects of our scientific enterprise. The main object is to allow for the spoken words of the Ancient Egyptians to come to life in the form they would have understood them .The fact that other peoples such as Semites, Persians, Greeks represented ?egyptian? words a certain way, does not warrant the need to perpetuate such corruption, as this would rob the words of their true essence. Much as the ?pidgin? words ?ikobi, inokobi?, would not sound familiar to the English person as the words ?to be, or not to be?, neither could ?words? such as miri, kem, osiris represent Ancient Egyptian muara, ekim and ase respectively. The expectation is that Efik people, referenced as the representative group for the sake of simplicity, can help lead as far as possible, in refocusing on the ways and mysteries of a civilization that might have introduced to the world, the very vehicle that would eventually lead to the light.

England The Biography

The Story of English Cricket Simon Wilde ... 2008) Cowdrey, Colin, MCC The
Autobiography of a Cricketer (Hodder & Stoughton, 1976) Dellor, Ralph, and
Stephen Lamb, Lost Voices of Cricket (Bene Factum Publishing, 2014) Dexter,
Ted, Ted ...

England  The Biography

'An astonishing work of research, detail and revelation. Bulging with information, packed with nuggets.' John Etheridge, Sun 'Superbly researched... His eye for detail never wavers. It’s a pleasure to read.' Vic Marks, Observer 'The Cricket Book of the Year: Dauntingly comprehensive and surprisingly light-footed.' Simon Briggs, Daily Telegraph England: The Biography is the most comprehensive account of the England cricket team that has ever been published, taking the reader into the heart of the action and the team dynamics that have helped shape their success, or otherwise. It is now 140 years since England first played Test match cricket and, for much of that time, it has struggled to perform to the best of its capabilities. In the early years, amateurs would pick and choose which matches and tours they would play; subsequently, the demands of the county game - and the petty jealousies that created - would prevent many from achieving their best. It was only in the 1990s that central contracts were brought in, and Team England began to receive the best possible support from an ever-increasing backroom team. But cricket isn't just about structures, it depends like no other sport on questions of how successful the captain is in motivating and leading his team, and how well different personalities and egos are integrated and managed in the changing room. From Joe Root and Alastair Cook back to Mike Atherton, Mike Brearley and Ray Illingworth, England captains have had a heavy influence on proceedings. Recent debates over Kevin Pietersen were nothing new, as contemporaries of W.G.Grace would doubtless recognise. As England play their 1000th Test, this is a brilliant and unmissable insight into the ups and downs of that story.

The Lost Voices of World War I

From the start , he did well both in the classroom and on the playing field ; for
although early on he adopted the pose of the decadent aesthete , winning the
school poetry prize in 1905 , he found time to play in the cricket XI and the rugger
XV .

The Lost Voices of World War I

Gathers selections from the poetry, prose, and plays of writers killed during World War I, and includes brief profiles of each individual

Voices of Akenfield

'You can go and be maid to old Mrs Barney Wickes, now she has lost her
husband.' Mrs Barney Wickes was blind and my sister ... of the game. We played
this for hours on end. We had no toys, no books and we didn't play cricket or
football.

Voices of Akenfield

Born and brought up in rural Suffolk, Ronald Blythe was fascinated by the rhythms of country life and the stories of the people he had known since childhood. In this perceptive and moving evocation of his home, the villagers speak candidly about their lives, from the reminiscences of survivors of the First World War to a younger generation of farm workers, as well as the personal recollections of a school teacher, blacksmith, saddler, bellringer and district nurse. Together they give us the voice of a village, and of a vanished rural England. Generations of inhabitants have helped shape the English countryside - but it has profoundly shaped us too.It has provoked a huge variety of responses from artists, writers, musicians and people who live and work on the land - as well as those who are travelling through it.English Journeys celebrates this long tradition with a series of twenty books on all aspects of the countryside, from stargazey pie and country churches, to man's relationship with nature and songs celebrating the patterns of the countryside (as well as ghosts and love-struck soldiers).

Tale of Genji

... ride away, recited the poem which says “Ceaseless as the interminable voices
of the bell-cricket, all night till dawn my tears flow.” The mother answered “Upon
the thickets that teem with myriad insect voices falls the dew of a Cloud Dweller's
tears”; for the people ... All this, together with a poem in which she compared her
grandchild to a flower which has lost the tree that sheltered it from the great winds
, ...

Tale of Genji

"What Waley did create is literary art of extraordinary beauty that brings to life in English the world Murasaki Shikibu imagined. The beauty of his art has not dimmed, but like the original text itself retains the power to move and enlighten."—Dennis Washburn, from his foreword Centuries before Shakespeare, Murasaki Shikibu's The Tale of Genji was already acknowledged as a classic of Japanese literature. Over the past century, this book has gained worldwide acceptance as not only the world's first novel but as one of the greatest works of literature of all time. The hero of the tale, Prince Genji, is a shining example of the Heian-era ideal man—accomplished in poetry, dance, music, painting, and, not least of all to the novel's many plots, romance. The Tale of Genji and the characters and world it depicts have influenced Japanese culture to its very core. This celebrated translation by Arthur Waley gives Western readers a very genuine feel for the tone of this beloved classic. This edition contains the complete Waley translation of all six books of The Tale of Genji and also contains a new foreword by Dennis Washburn with key insights into both the book and the importance of this translation for modern readers.

Old Faithful

( The captive voice , far away , put on a cricket ' s clothes . ) There ' s a lot going
on in this little poem . The surreal elements occur in the imaginative leaps and
the metaphor for loss that Lorca creates . For example , on first glance it ' s odd to
 ...

Old Faithful

In this popular book, 18 teaching creative writers describe their single best writing assignment, the one that never fails to inspire their students to tell and dramatize stories, to write autobiographical pieces, fiction, poetry, and plays, or to become interested in wordplay and oral history. The essays fully describe practical ideas for adaption and use with students of all ages and abilities. The variety of approaches is unified by the respectful, engaged, and sympathetic attitude of the contributors and the enthusiastic response of their students. Most of the essays include examples of student work.

The Shorter Columbia Anthology of Traditional Chinese Literature

Looking at the empty cricket cage was enough to rob them of breath and make
their voices die in their throats, but they dared not question their son again. Their
eyes did ... He followed it closely, but lost it when it rounded the corner of a wall.

The Shorter Columbia Anthology of Traditional Chinese Literature

With its fresh translations by newer voices in the field, its broad scope, and its flowing style, this anthology places the immense riches of Chinese literature within easy reach. Ranging from the beginnings to 1919, this abridged version of The Columbia Anthology of Traditional Chinese Literature retains all the characteristics of the original. In putting together these selections Victor H. Mair interprets "literature" very broadly to include not just literary fiction, poetry, and drama, but folk and popular literature, lyrics and arias, elegies and rhapsodies, biographies, autobiographies and memoirs, letters, criticism and theory, and travelogues and jokes.

The Lost Pearl

In 1992, Pakistan brought home the cricket world cup trophy, and the nation
found a reason to be proud. ... chatting and singing to the rhythm of the rain in the
balconies of their homes, and most of all, the house full of people and full of
voices.

The Lost Pearl

Everything changes for nine-year-old Sana Shah when she witnesses the horror of her father's assassination. She suffers through the pain of losing him, while realizing the worth of lessons learnt from him as pearls of wisdom. The tragedy forces Sana to leave her home in Pakistan and move across the globe to California. As time passes, she remains tormented by her memories as she struggles to rediscover her identity in a foreign land. Keen on pursuing journalism, she attends Stanford, where she meets a law student, Ahmer. They are drawn together by their cultural heritage, as well as their shared experience of having lost and endured. He becomes the source of her happiness as well as the catalyst in mending her strained relationship with her family. As the story unfolds, however, their lives become intertwined in unexpected ways. The obstacles are countless, and may be impossible to overcome. Spanning nearly two decades and set against a backdrop of landmark political events in both Pakistan and America in recent history, The Lost Pearl is an emotional tale about the strength of the human bond and the consequences of a truth left untold.