Life of Richard Trevithick

With an Account of His Inventions

Life of Richard Trevithick


Life of Richard Trevithick

Life of Richard Trevithick

Reproduction of the original: Life of Richard Trevithick by Francis Trevithick

Richard Trevithick

Giant of Steam

Richard Trevithick

Richard Trevithick’s ‘Cornish engine’ was the world’s first self-propelled steam vehicle. His ‘Penydarren engine’ was the world’s first railway engine. But despite his towering historic achievements, fame and fortune obstinately eluded him. An often reckless yet truly brilliant engineer, he died in poverty and relative obscurity. Anthony Burton’s biography however rightly recognises him as one of the most remarkable figures in the history of the industrial revolution. His extraordinary and varied career, which took him from his native Cornwall to London, and then on to seventeen years of picaresque adventuring in South America, makes for wonderfully lively reading. Filled with dozens of illustrations and photographs, Richard Trevithick is a highly enjoyable, well researched biography that dissects the turbulent world of the industrial revolution.

Richard Trevithick

The Engineer and the Man

Richard Trevithick

This 1934 study of the life and work of Trevithick places his achievements in the context of the Industrial Revolution.

The Steam Locomotive

An Engineering History

The Steam Locomotive

Ken Gibbs tells the history of the engineering triumph that is a steam locomotive from the 1800s to the 1960s showing how each development changed the course of history.

The God Problem

How a Godless Cosmos Creates

The God Problem

God’s war crimes, Aristotle’s sneaky tricks, Einstein’s pajamas, information theory’s blind spot, Stephen Wolfram’s new kind of science, and six monkeys at six typewriters getting it wrong. What do these have to do with the birth of a universe and with your need for meaning? Everything, as you’re about to see. How does the cosmos do something it has long been thought only gods could achieve? How does an inanimate universe generate stunning new forms and unbelievable new powers without a creator? How does the cosmos create? That’s the central question of this book, which finds clues in strange places. Why A does not equal A. Why one plus one does not equal two. How the Greeks used kickballs to reinvent the universe. And the reason that Polish-born Benoît Mandelbrot—the father of fractal geometry—rebelled against his uncle. You’ll take a scientific expedition into the secret heart of a cosmos you’ve never seen. Not just any cosmos. An electrifyingly inventive cosmos. An obsessive-compulsive cosmos. A driven, ambitious cosmos. A cosmos of colossal shocks. A cosmos of screaming, stunning surprise. A cosmos that breaks five of science’s most sacred laws. Yes, five. And you’ll be rewarded with author Howard Bloom’s provocative new theory of the beginning, middle, and end of the universe—the Bloom toroidal model, also known as the big bagel theory—which explains two of the biggest mysteries in physics: dark energy and why, if antimatter and matter are created in equal amounts, there is so little antimatter in this universe. Called "truly awesome" by Nobel Prize–winner Dudley Herschbach, The God Problem will pull you in with the irresistible attraction of a black hole and spit you out again enlightened with the force of a big bang. Be prepared to have your mind blown. From the Hardcover edition.

Matthew Boulton

Industry's Great Innovator

Matthew Boulton

Matthew Boulton, of the famous Boulton & Watt steam engine partnership, was an eighteenth-century designer and inventor. Before he partnered up with James Watt he was a successful industrialist manufacturing a range of silver and plated goods, buttons and buckles, and the sort of knickknackery known at the time as ‘toys’. He had a business network throughout continental Europe with travelling agents who represented his various interests. Without his commercial skills, Watt would probably have failed to bring his steam engine to market, but in due course Boulton started the process that would revolutionise the world of industry and transport: the engine was exported all over the world. Boulton was an affable man who enjoyed company and creative conversation. He was also a founder member of the Lunar Society and became a fellow of the Royal Society. This exciting new book, the first full-length biography of Matthew Boulton since H.W. Dickinson’s excellent publication in 1937, is the culmination of twenty years’ original research and brings to life one of the most colourful characters of the Industrial Revolution.

Links

The Bulletin of the Newcomen Society

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Lives of the Engineers

With an Account of Their Principal Works; Comprising Also a History of Inland Communication in Britain

Lives of the Engineers

Spanning from the Roman to Victorian period, this three-volume work (1861-2) provides detailed biographies of Britain's most notable engineers.