Germantown

Hanover is a little town 12 hours from St. Louis and 7 hours from the Okaw ( River
) and Vertsville ( now Fayetteville ) ... There are many German Catholics living
here , and this summer here in Hanover , a new church was built ... I wouldn't
advise anyone to ... in this land are inspiring . There are stories of a prairie fire in
which a mother and child burned to death while in flight to a neighboring
farmhouse ...

Germantown

Germantown is a unique community located 40 miles southeast of St. Louis, Missouri. It has a single Catholic church as its center and a rich German heritage. This is a pictorial history of the settlement that grew out of a desire for worship. The first German settlers came to Shoal Creek in 1833 and worshipped in a small house that contained neither benches nor chairs and had a split oak bench supported by four props that served as the communion rail. In 1837, the German homesteaders bought several tracts of land and reserved the ground in the center as church property. Preparations for the present stone building took two years, and it was completed in 1854. At that time, St. Boniface Catholic Church was the largest church in the state of Illinois. It is still referred to as the mother church of Clinton County.

Between Dignity and Despair

Draws on memoirs, diaries, and letters of Jews living in Nazi Germany at the start of the holocaust

Between Dignity and Despair

Draws on memoirs, diaries, and letters of Jews living in Nazi Germany at the start of the holocaust

The Long Life and Swift Death of Jewish Rechitsa

Rechitsa suffered less from German bombardment than many of the other towns
in Belorussia at the beginning of the war. ... The bomb burst near the town's
center; no one was killed and nothing was damaged, but it clearly signaled that
the ...

The Long Life and Swift Death of Jewish Rechitsa

Located on the Dnieper River at the crossroads of Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine, the town of Rechitsa had one of the oldest Jewish communities in Belarus, dating back to medieval times. By the late nineteenth century, Jews constituted more than half of the town’s population. Rich in tradition, Jewish Rechitsa was part of a distinctive Lithuanian-Belorussian culture full of stories, vibrant personalities, achievement, and epic struggle that was gradually lost through migration, pogroms, and the Holocaust. Now, in Albert Kaganovitch’s meticulously researched history, this forgotten Jewish world is brought to life. Based on extensive use of Soviet and Israeli archives, interviews, memoirs, and secondary sources, Kaganovitch’s acclaimed work, originally published in Russian, is presented here in a significantly revised English translation by the author. Details of demographic, social, economic, and cultural changes in Rechitsa’s evolution, presented over the sweep of centuries, reveal a microcosm of daily Jewish life in Rechitsa and similar communities. Kaganovitch looks closely at such critical developments as the spread of Chabad Hasidism, the impact of multiple political transformations and global changes, and the mass murder of Rechitsa’s remaining Jews by the German army in November to December 1941. Kaganovitch also documents the evolving status of Jews in the postwar era, starting with the reconstitution of a Jewish community in Rechitsa not long after liberation in 1943 and continuing with economic, social, and political trends under Stalin, Khrushchev, and Brezhnev, and finally emigration from post-Soviet Belarus. The Long Life and Swift Death of Jewish Rechitsa is a major achievement. Winner, Helen and Stan Vine Canadian Jewish Book Award for Scholarship, Koffler Centre of the Arts

Living and Dying in Hungary

For most of his life, he chose to live in a small town where he could easily win in
any social and business rivalry, but he carefully avoided the ... She became well
—read in German and French literature, and she knew and bought modern art.

Living and Dying in Hungary

Th is book was written about his family, his life, and his experiences before World War II was over. It was written more like a clinical record rather than a melodramatic memoirit is somewhat less, somewhat more than pure literature.

Life and Death in the Third Reich

... the police station to be told to hold his tongue in November 1938, the town's
Jewish dentist sent off for 'resettlement' in September 1942."" This observation is
alert to the fact that National Socialism did not terrorize the German population
into submission, ... public claims, and in which ethnic groups and religious
communities commingled, came to an abrupt 82 • LIFE AND DEATH IN THE
THIRD REICH IX.

Life and Death in the Third Reich

A scholar deciphers the puzzle of Nazism's ideological grip in a critical analysis that examines the efforts of Germans to adjust to new racial identities, to believe in the necessity of war, and to accept the dynamic of unconditional destruction.

Urban Village Population Community and Family Structure in Germantown Pensylvania 1683 1800

These involved what might be called the fertility and life expectancy of the native
population and attempted to explain ... 135, #40, for example, states that the
Indians became subjected to disease and death as well as to a loss of fertility by
 ...

Urban Village Population  Community and Family Structure in Germantown Pensylvania 1683 1800

Most studies of eighteenth-century community life in America have focused on New England, and in many respects the New England town has become a model for our understanding of communities throughout the United States during this period. In this study of a mid-Atlantic town, Stephanie Grauman Wolf describes a very different way of organizing society, indicating that the New England model may prove atypical. In addition, her analysis suggests the origins of twentieth-century social patterns in eighteenth-century life. Germantown, Pennsylvania, was chosen for study because it was a small urban center characterized by an ethnically and religiously mixed population of high mobility. The author uses quantitative analysis and sample case study to examine all aspects of the community. She finds that heterogeneity and mobility had a marked effect on urban development--on landholding, occupation, life style, and related areas; community organization for the control of government and church affairs; and the structure and demographic development of the: family. Her work represents an important advance not only in our understanding of eighteenth-century American society, but also in the ways in which we investigate it.

Universal Historical Dictionary

name was Tascher de la Pagerie, and after the death of her || husband, who was
guillotined by order of Robespiere, ... civil as well as military, he retired on the
accession of George II. from public life, and died in 1745 at an advanced age. ... a
German actor and dramatist of great celebrity, was born in 1759, and died in
1814, leaving numerous tragedies and comedies. ... a market town and borough
by prescription, in Somersetshire, appears to have been a place of some
importance at ...

Universal Historical Dictionary


To Live and to Die When Why and How

In German poetry, the folk song There Goes a Reaper, Named Death initiated the
writing of many powerful poems devoted to the subject of ... In his play Our Town,
Wilder looks at the whole of life of a small town from the perspective of death.

To Live and to Die  When  Why  and How

In the 1960's marked changes occurred throughout the world in philosophies and policies related to man's role in life. These changes, prompted predominantly by extensive increases in knowledge and popula tion density, have produced increased pleasures as well as problems. The rising number of people and improved methods of communication and transportation have caused more relationships among people, with their pleasures, competitions, jealousies, conflicts of interest, oppressions, and crimes. Large assortments of drugs have been developed and are easily obtained. There are drugs to speed us up, slow us down, make us sleep, change our perspectives on life, promote propagation of life or prevent it, prolong life or terminate it, and modify the course of life in many ways. Also, numerous mechanical devices have been developed that influence the propagation of life, the termination of life, and the manner in which we live. Many people have changed their overall goals in life, and in par ticular have experienced major changes in attitudes and policies applying to sexual activity, marriage, birth control, abortion, welfare, children, old people, criminals, economics, social status, careers, education, euthanasia, and suicide. There also has been marked enlightenment concerning the effect of the chemical and physical status of the brain upon normal and abnormal thinking and behavior.

The Life and Death of a Polish Shtetl

... his generosity in making such donations had a wide appeal and even carried
over to other villages and towns in Poland. ... War I when half of the Jewish
community in Mlawa was forced to flee the city, which was near the German
border.

The Life and Death of a Polish Shtetl

Numerous Holocaust memoirs recount the unspeakable horrors that individuals witnessed and endured during the Nazis? reign. Less well known are the post?World War II yizkors, collective memoirs written by survivors to memorialize a home village purged or destroyed by Nazis. The Hebrew word yizkor translates as ?he shall remember? and also refers to a prayer for the dead. While hundreds of yizkors exist, very few have been translated into English. The Life and Death of a Polish Shtetl, the memorial for the town of Strzegowo, was collected and edited in 1951. Its stories are simple, yet they evoke considerable emotional turmoil. Some are shattering tales of torture, cultural destruction, and death. Others are moving remembrances of what the beloved little town was like before it was invaded by the Nazis. Because there is no longer a Jewish population living in Strzegowo, this book is an important record of what was lost.

A Small Town Near Auschwitz

... remembered the 'bloody Wednesday', when, following the death of a German,
all Jewish men between 16 and 30 had to ... life and wellbeing in the interests of
terrorizing the population into submission and establishing German domination.

A Small Town Near Auschwitz

The Silesian town of Bedzin lies a mere twenty-five miles from Auschwitz; through the linked ghettos of Bedzin and its neighbouring town, some 85,000 Jews passed on their way to slave labour or the gas chambers. The principal civilian administrator of Bedzin, Udo Klausa, was a happily married family man. He was also responsible for implementing Nazi policies towards the Jews in his area - inhumane processes that were the precursors of genocide. Yet he later claimed, like so many other Germans after the war, that he had 'known nothing about it'; and that he had personally tried to save a Jew before he himself managed to leave for military service. A Small Town Near Auschwitz re-creates Udo Klausa's story. Using a wealth of personal letters, memoirs, testimonies, interviews and other sources, Mary Fulbrook pieces together his role in the unfolding stigmatization and degradation of the Jews under his authoritiy, as well as the heroic attempts at resistance on the part of some of his victims. She also gives us a fascinating insight into the inner conflicts of a Nazi functionary who, throughout, considered himself a 'decent' man. And she explores the conflicting memories and evasions of his life after the war. But the book is much more than a portrayal of an individual man. Udo Klausa's case is so important because it is in many ways so typical. Behind Klausa's story is the larger story of how countless local functionaries across the Third Reich facilitated the murderous plans of a relatively small number among the Nazi elite - and of how those plans could never have been realized, on the same scale, without the diligent cooperation of these generally very ordinary administrators. As Fulbrook shows, men like Klausa 'knew' and yet mostly suppressed this knowledge, performing their day jobs without apparent recognition of their own role in the system, or any sense of personal wrongdoing or remorse - either before or after 1945. This account is no ordinary historical reconstruction. For Fulbrook did not discover Udo Klausa amongst the archives. She has known the Klausa family all her life. She had no inkling of her subject's true role in the Third Reich until a few years ago, a discovery that led directly to this inescapably personal professional history.