Letter to the One Percent

Letter to the One Percent

Letter to the One Percent is exactly what it sounds like: a letter to the richest one percent of American households. It is a call to action, a plea for compassion, and a manifesto for the future. It tells the story of their extraordinary success - and how the other 99 percent of Americans missed out. It explains how this divergence caused household income to stagnate, forced millions of Americans into poverty, and triggered the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. It appeals to the better angels of their nature to bear a higher burden -- by paying higher taxes, empowering labor, and cracking down on white-collar crime -- in order to reverse the damage done in the past three decades.

High School Journalism

High School Journalism

Includes a brief history of American journalism and discusses the duties of a journalist, styles of writing, the parts of a newspaper, newspaper and yearbook design, photography, and careers in journalism.

Tracks: the Call of an Average Man to Be More

The Biography of Pastor Robert Garber

Tracks: the Call of an Average Man to Be More

This is the story of an ordinary man who has inspired countless individuals around the world with his devotion to the Baptist church and his belief in the goodness of people. Robert Garber, once a young hot-rodding farmboy, married his high school sweetheart and started his adulthood as a soft drink salesman before heeding his call from God. He has traveled the world to spread his understanding of God and endured tragedy, loss, and heartache that tested his faith to the limits over his storied lifetime. Pastor Bob has inspired thousands through the numerous churches he has founded and led throughout the Pennsylvania region, and he continues to touch the lives of many near and far.

Improving Schools

my "Letters to the Editor"

Improving Schools

This is a selection of my “Letters to the Editor” that were published in two local dailies, The Star and New Straits Times (NST), over the period from Dec 2007 to August 2013. These letters relate my experiences in leading and managing schools and embody my thoughts and propositions for school improvement, enrichment as well as innovation. The letters are not presented in chronological order following their dates of publication. Instead, they are grouped according to specific sections of interest. Nevertheless, I am mindful of the fact that school matters often overlap and school issues cannot be tackled in discrete units. An integrated and holistic approach should be applied. And, thinking out of the box so as to bring about innovation and even “transformation” is very much advocated all through my letters. Schools are where national education policies are being piloted, modified and if appropriate, then implemented in full. Stake holders for the wellbeing, upgrading and progress of a school must of necessity include more than merely its students, parents, teachers and administrators. ix The Education Ministry, state and district education offices, other related ministries, the community, private sectors and certainly some non-government organizations (NGOs), all have important roles to play in ensuring the smooth and efficient running of our schools. I have looked within and outside of schools for causes and effects that have bearing on school matters. The letters included in the “Values” section in particular, bear out the familial and societal influence and impact on school life. It is hoped that this compilation can be a useful reference and resource materials for all planners, executors, learners and evaluators of our school improvement initiatives and programmes. August 2013 --- LIONG KAM CHONG

The Letter

The Letter

The Letter is an adventure that starts out in first gear and then immediately shifts into fifth. You'll feel the wind in your hair and the blood racing through your veins from start to finish. Hold on tight! This latest effort from J.D. Fitzpatrick orders up a new prescription for your glasses so that you can see murder, mystery and the bonds of family in an entirely new light. Follow the events of a young, blue-collar, ex-football star (Jack Dade), as he finds himself looking for some much needed changes within his all too familiar life. Needless to say, one trip to his mailbox will transform who he is, who he will be, and all that he knows forever. Jack couldn't breathe as his chest was roped-tight and his heart pounding. His right hand was shaking and now his eyes began to blur the text of the letter fading in and out of focus. Jack stood up and went into the kitchen, he stood next to the stove and opened his small, yet fully stocked, liquor cabinet. Jack poured himself a shot of tequila whoosh, then he poured another. To find other works and projects by J.D. Fitzpatrick, visit him at his website www.lyricsthatfitz.homestead.com/1.html.

Civil Rights in the Gateway to the South

Louisville, Kentucky, 1945-1980

Civil Rights in the Gateway to the South

Situated on the banks of the Ohio River, Louisville, Kentucky, represents a cultural and geographical intersection of North and South. Throughout its history, Louisville has simultaneously displayed northern and southern characteristics in its race relations. In their struggles against racial injustice in the mid-twentieth century, activists in Louisville crossed racial, economic, and political dividing lines to form a wide array of alliances not seen in other cities of its size. In Civil Rights in the Gateway to the South: Louisville, Kentucky, 1945--1980, noted historian Tracy E. K'Meyer provides the first comprehensive look at the distinctive elements of Louisville's civil rights movement. K'Meyer frames her groundbreaking analysis by defining a border as a space where historical patterns and social concerns overlap. From this vantage point, she argues that broad coalitions of Louisvillians waged long-term, interconnected battles during the city's civil rights movement. K'Meyer shows that Louisville's border city dynamics influenced both its racial tensions and its citizens' approaches to change. Unlike African Americans in southern cities, Louisville's black citizens did not face entrenched restrictions against voting and other forms of civic engagement. Louisville schools were integrated relatively peacefully in 1956, long before their counterparts in the Deep South. However, the city bore the marks of Jim Crow segregation in public accommodations until the 1960s. Louisville joined other southern cities that were feeling the heat of racial tensions, primarily during open housing and busing conflicts (more commonly seen in the North) in the late 1960s and 1970s. In response to Louisville's unique blend of racial problems, activists employed northern models of voter mobilization and lobbying, as well as methods of civil disobedience usually seen in the South. They crossed traditional barriers between the movements for racial and economic justice to unite in common action. Borrowing tactics from their neighbors to the north and south, Louisville citizens merged their concerns and consolidated their efforts to increase justice and fairness in their border city. By examining this unique convergence of activist methods, Civil Rights in the Gateway to the South provides a better understanding of the circumstances that unified the movement across regional boundaries.