Letters of Colonel Sir Augustus Simon Frazer, K. C. B. Commanding the Royal Horse Artillery in the Army Under Wellington. Written During the Peninsular and Waterloo Campaigns

Letters of Colonel Sir Augustus Simon Frazer, K. C. B. Commanding the Royal Horse Artillery in the Army Under Wellington. Written During the Peninsular and Waterloo Campaigns

This book has been considered by academicians and scholars of great significance and value to literature. This forms a part of the knowledge base for future generations. So that the book is never forgotten we have represented this book in a print format as the same form as it was originally first published. Hence any marks or annotations seen are left intentionally to preserve its true nature.

The Letters of Sir Augustus Frazer K.C.B. Commanding The Royal Horse Artillery

In The Army Under The Duke Of Wellington [Illustrated Edition]

The Letters of Sir Augustus Frazer K.C.B. Commanding The Royal Horse Artillery

Includes over 100 maps of the actions, engagements and battles of the entire Peninsular War. “A full and vivid account of the Peninsula War and the Waterloo campaign as they happened in some 180 letters to his family written by Col. Frazer, commander of the Horse Artillery in both conflicts. The writer of these letters, Colonel Sir Augustus Simon Frazer, K.C.B, was born in September 1776 and a month before his fourteenth birthday he was admitted as a Gentleman Cadet into the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich... Promoted Major in June 1811 he went to the Peninsula in November 1812, and it is from this date that the letters begin. In April 1813 Frazer was appointed to command the Horse Artillery of the army and as such saw action at Salamanca, Osma, Vitoria, St Sebastian, the crossings of the Bidassoa, Nive and Adour. He was severely wounded at the siege of Bayonne on 27 February 1814 but was back for the final battle of Toulouse in April which brought hostilities against the French to a close. When war with France broke out again on Napoleon’s escape from Elba Sir Augustus joined the allied army in Flanders, under the Duke of Wellington, in March 1815 and resumed command of the Horse Artillery, the post he held during the battle of Waterloo. On return to England he was appointed commander HQ RHA, Woolwich until promoted Colonel in January 1825. Frazer was a prolific letter writer and the letters contained in this book were written to his wife, Lady Emma Frazer (whom he married in 1809) and to his wife’s sister and her husband, Major and Mrs Moore. They give a fascinating account of the stirring events of the time. 140 of them were written during the Peninsular campaign and a further 41 during the Waterloo campaign. They describe events literally as they occurred.”-Print ed.

Journal of the Waterloo Campaign

Journal of the Waterloo Campaign

Mercers journal is the most outstanding eyewitness account of the Waterloo campaign ever published. It is a classic of military history. This new, fully illustrated edition, featuring an extensive introduction and notes by Andrew Uffindell, one of the leading authorities on the Napoleonic Wars, contains a mass of additional material not included in the original. As the bicentenary of Waterloo approaches, this beautifully prepared, scholarly edition of Mercers work will be essential reading for anyone who wishes to know what it was really like to fight in the final, great battle against Napoleon.

The Peninsular War

A New History

The Peninsular War

At the end of the 18th century Spain remained one of the world's most powerful empires. Portugal, too, was prosperous at the time. By 1808, everything had changed. Portugal was under occupation and ravaged by famine, disease, economic problems and political instability. Spain had imploded and worse was to come. For the next six years, the peninsula was the helpless victim of others, suffering perhaps over a million deaths while troops from all over Europe tore it to pieces. Charles Esdaile's brilliant new history of the conflict makes plain the scope of the tragedy and its far-reaching effects, especially the poisonous legacy that produced the Spanish civil war of 1936-9.

British Liberators in the Age of Napoleon

Volunteering under the Spanish Flag in the Peninsular War

British Liberators in the Age of Napoleon

This book unveils the role of a hitherto unrecognized group of men who, long before the International Brigades made its name in the Spanish Civil War, also found reasons to fight under the Spanish flag. Their enemy was not fascism, but what could be at times an equally overbearing ideology: Napoleon's imperialism. Although small in number, British volunteers played a surprisingly influential role in the conduct of war operations, in politics, gender and social equality, in cultural life both in Britain and Spain and even in relation to emancipation movements in Latin America. Some became prisoners of war while a few served with guerrilla forces. Many of the works published about the Peninsular War in the last two decades have adopted an Anglocentric narrative, writing the Spanish forces out of victories, or have tended to present the war, not as much won by the allies, but lost by the French. This book takes a radically different approach by drawing on previously untapped archival sources to argue that victory was the outcome of a truly transnational effort. >

Who was Who at Waterloo

A Biography of the Battle

Who was Who at Waterloo

Everyone knows about the Battle of Waterloo – or do they? This book presents the battle as never before: through the personal stories of over 150 people present at the battle or its immediate aftermath. A reference book, a biographical dictionary, and a myth-busting expose, Who was Who at Waterloo is an indispensable guide to history’s most famous battle. Arranged in alphabetical order, and with entries highlighted throughout the text like links in a website, the book boasts a colourful cast of soldiers, politicians, peasants, surgeons, artists, novelists, poets, scientists, entrepreneurs, and more. It provides many sorties into nineteenth century culture, politics, medicine and science. It also provides a thorough look at the sources, identifying myths, irregularities and cover-ups. The book demonstrates how little we can really know about Waterloo. And yet it also demonstrates just how much can be said about the battle’s participants.