Learning from Our Mistakes

This book focuses on the issue of mistakes in psychoanalysis and psychodynamic therapy--the inevitability of making them, as far as possible how to avoid them, and what therapists can do to transform potential disasters into a means for ...

Learning from Our Mistakes

This book focuses on the issue of mistakes in psychoanalysis and psychodynamic therapy--the inevitability of making them, as far as possible how to avoid them, and what therapists can do to transform potential disasters into a means for growth in themselves as well as the patient. Further developing the creative therapeutic approach first elaborated in his classic Learning from the Patient, distinguished clinician and author Patrick Casement makes a compelling case for being open-minded rather than dogmatic in clinical practice. He shows how analysts can become blind to their own mistakes, and even more significantly, can fail to recognize when their efforts to guide or control the therapeutic process have become a problem for the patient. A wealth of evocative case material is used to illustrate how the process of internal supervision can facilitate heightened awareness of the patient's experience within the clinical encounter. Written with rare candor, this book challenges many traditional assumptions even as it affirms the healing power of psychodynamic work. It will be read with pleasure by practicing therapists as well as students and trainees. Winner--Gradiva Award, National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis

Learning from Our Mistakes

In Learning from Our Mistakes, you¿ll come face-to-face with classic difficult cases, and you¿ll see from a feminist perspective how therapists used various treatments to deal with these seemingly insurmountable challenges.

Learning from Our Mistakes

If you¿re a long-time veteran of feminist therapy or someone just starting out, you¿ll find a helpful, reliable list of "dos" and "don¿ts" in Learning from Our Mistakes: Difficulties and Failures in Feminist Therapy. Frank and honest in tone, makeup, and style, this one-of-a-kind publication looks at the failures and roadblocks that have hampered feminist therapists in the past so you can learn from their misfortunes and avoid them in your own professional endeavors. In Learning from Our Mistakes, you¿ll come face-to-face with classic difficult cases, and you¿ll see from a feminist perspective how therapists used various treatments to deal with these seemingly insurmountable challenges. You¿ll find that these and other topics will help you in navigating the difficult situations that arise in your personal practice: the pros and cons of terminating with a client who has an eroticized transference differences between therapists and clients in terms of race, ethnicity, and age problems encountered by rural therapists in small communities using a translator in therapy when the therapist and client don¿t speak the same language feelings of anger in therapy many other "log jams" in the therapeutic process It¿s no mistake that Learning from Our Mistakes is full of what works and what doesn¿t. In it, three veteran discussants give you the tools necessary to overcome the uncertainties and inadequacies that plague therapists. You¿ll come away understanding the many ways failure is embedded in both the theory and practice of psychotherapy. Ultimately, you¿ll find that mistakes are really only failure narratives waiting to be used, shaped, and turned toward the positive experiences of both client and therapist.

Learning from Our Mistakes

... is an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business Learning from
Our Mistakes: Difficulties and Failures in Feminist Therapy has been co-
published simultaneously as Women & Therapy,Ē Volume 21, Number 3 1998. ©
1998 ...

Learning from Our Mistakes

If you’re a long-time veteran of feminist therapy or someone just starting out, you’ll find a helpful, reliable list of “dos” and “don’ts” in Learning from Our Mistakes: Difficulties and Failures in Feminist Therapy. Frank and honest in tone, makeup, and style, this one-of-a-kind publication looks at the failures and roadblocks that have hampered feminist therapists in the past so you can learn from their misfortunes and avoid them in your own professional endeavors. In Learning from Our Mistakes, you’ll come face-to-face with classic difficult cases, and you’ll see from a feminist perspective how therapists used various treatments to deal with these seemingly insurmountable challenges. You’ll find that these and other topics will help you in navigating the difficult situations that arise in your personal practice: the pros and cons of terminating with a client who has an eroticized transference differences between therapists and clients in terms of race, ethnicity, and age problems encountered by rural therapists in small communities using a translator in therapy when the therapist and client don’t speak the same language feelings of anger in therapy many other “log jams” in the therapeutic process It’s no mistake that Learning from Our Mistakes is full of what works and what doesn’t. In it, three veteran discussants give you the tools necessary to overcome the uncertainties and inadequacies that plague therapists. You’ll come away understanding the many ways failure is embedded in both the theory and practice of psychotherapy. Ultimately, you’ll find that mistakes are really only failure narratives waiting to be used, shaped, and turned toward the positive experiences of both client and therapist.

Watching the Disciples Learning from Their Mistakes

Perhaps recognizing the disciples' mistake in assuming that the crowds had been
with Jesus long enough can remind us of the benefit of sharing in smaller groups
withinour faith communities. Listening to a profound sermon may have a ...

Watching the Disciples   Learning from Their Mistakes

A theme-based study of how the twelve disciples continued to follow Jesus in spite of the mistakes they made.

Learning from Mistakes in Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy

Preface In our considerable experience of teaching and supervising REBT, we
have noticed a large number of common mistakes that trainees regularly make (
in fact, we can reliably predict what most of these mistakes will be). One weekend
 ...

Learning from Mistakes in Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy

Mistakes are often an inevitable part of training; Learning from Mistakes in Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy encourages the trainee to pinpoint potential errors at the earliest possible stage in training, helping them to make fast progress towards becoming competent REBT practitioners. Windy Dryden and Michael Neenan have compiled 111 of the most common errors, explaining what has gone wrong and how to put it right, and have divided them into eight accessible parts: general mistakes assessment mistakes goal-setting mistakes disputing mistakes homework mistakes mistakes in dealing with client doubts and misconceptions working through mistakes self-maintenance. Learning from Mistakes in Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy is an indispensable guide for anyone embarking on a career in the REBT field.

Black Box Thinking

Learning from failure has the status of a cliché, but this book reveals the astonishing story behind the most powerful method of learning known to mankind, and reveals the arsenal of techniques wielded by some of the world's most ...

Black Box Thinking

What links the Mercedes Formula One team with Google? What links Dave Braisford's Team Sky and the aviation industry? What is the connection between the inventor James Dyson and the footballer David Beckham? They are all Black Box Thinkers. Whether developing a new product, honing a core skill or just trying to get a critical decision right, Black Box Thinkers aren't afraid to face up to mistakes. In fact, they see failure as the very best way to learn. Rather than denying their mistakes, blaming others or attempting to spin their way out of trouble, these institutions and individuals interrogate errors as part of their future strategy for success. How many of us, hand on heart, can say that we have such a healthy relationship with failure? Learning from failure has the status of a cliché, but this book reveals the astonishing story behind the most powerful method of learning known to mankind, and reveals the arsenal of techniques wielded by some of the world's most innovative organizations. Their lessons can be applied across every field - from sport to education, from business to health. Using gripping case studies, exclusive interviews and really practical takeaways, Matthew Syed - the award-winning journalist and best-selling author of Bounce - explains how to turn failure into success, and shows us how we can all become better Black Box Thinkers.

Ending the Blame Culture

THE IMPORTANCE OF LEARNING FROM MISTAKES 5 first example, the man
may have been embarrassed, or worried ... Indeed the lessons that we can learn
from our mistakes may be very powerful; often they are lessons we could not
learn ...

Ending the Blame Culture

This book is about mistakes and what we can learn from them. It faces up to, and explains how organizations can escape from ’blame cultures’, where fearful conformance and risk avoidance lead to stagnation, to ’gain cultures’ which tolerate and even encourage mistakes in the pursuit of innovation, change and improvement. Ending the Blame Culture was written as a result of systematic analysis of the content of over 200 accounts of real mistakes within businesses and organizations. This analysis provides both insight and understanding into the type of mistakes made, the context they were made in and how they helped learning and development. As a result the authors are able to distinguish between intelligent and undesirable mistakes: those which should be tolerated and those which must be avoided. The result is a book which gives sound advice on how individuals learn, practical measures that organizations can adopt to enhance learning through better management of mistakes, and the promotion of a culture which supports and fosters experimentation and risk taking.

Lessons I Learned From The Lord

perfected with each failure—for most times, we don't learn from what we do right,
but from our mistakes. So even by learning from our failures, God works all things
for good. There is no growth without change, and there is no change without ...

Lessons I Learned From The Lord

DIVLearn how the Lord speaks to us in many different ways and to trust in Him for the miracles He has planned./div

Discussing the Undiscussable

Mistakes,. Continuous. Learning,. and. Progress. Learning occurs when we
detect and correct error,” Argyris wrote in his book ... And yet learning from our
mistakes is key to sustaining any progress we make in dealing with defensive
routines.

Discussing the Undiscussable

Since his 1990 landmark book Overcoming Organizational Defenses, Chris Argyris has extensively researched and written about how well-meaning, smart people create vicious cycles of defensive behavior to protect themselves from embarrassment and threat. In Discussing the Undiscussable, Bill Noonan enlivens the scholarly work of Chris Argyris through the use of reflective exercises and easy-to-read chapters that illuminate the basic human experience endemic to the creation of defensive routines. This book offers hope for altering organizational defensive routines by leveraging the greatest opportunity for change—the way we think and act. Discussing the Undiscussable provides a set of practical “how to do” exercises for detecting, surfacing, and discussing organizational defensive routines in a safe and productive way. The combination of text, business fable, and interactive and reflective exercises is versatile in its application to both individuals and groups. The companion DVD contains video vignettes of the book’s business fable where the actors model both defensive routines and virtuous cycles of behavior. Readers will instantly recognize what has long been going on in the workplace, and will be able to develop the skills to talk about it productively.

On Learning From the Patient

It is my conviction that we can learn as much from our mistakes as from the times
when we more readily get it right. There have been some genius analysts, such
as Freud and Winnicott, who learned naturally how to learn from their patients.

On Learning From the Patient

"On Learning from the Patient is concerned with the potential for psychoanalytic thinking to become self-perpetuating. Patrick Casement explores the dynamics of the helping relationship - learning to recognize how patients offer cues to the therapeutic experience that they are unconsciously in search of. Using many telling clinical examples, he illustrates how, through trial identification, he has learned to monitor the implications of his own contributions to a session from the viewpoint of the patient. He shows how, with the aid of this internal supervision, many initial failures to respond appropriately can be remedied and even used to the benefit of the therapeutic work. By learning to better distinguish what helps the therapeutic process from what hinders it, ways are discovered to avoid the circularity of pre-conception by analysts who aim to understand the unconscious of others. From this lively examination of key clinical issues, the author comes to see psychoanalytic therapy as a process of re-discovering theory - and developing a technique that is more specifically related to the individual patient. The dynamics illustrated here, particularly the processes of interactive communication and containment, occur in any helping relationship and are applicable throughout the caring professions. Patrick Casement's unusually frank presentation of his own work, aided by his lucid and non-technical language, allows wide scope for readers to form their own ideas about the approach to technique he describes. This Classic Edition includes a new introduction to the work by Andrew Samuels and, together with its sequel Further Learning from the Patient, will be an invaluable training resource for trainee and practising analysts or therapists."--