Leading School Turnaround

How Successful Leaders Transform Low-Performing Schools

Leading School Turnaround

Praise for Leading School Turnaround "Going beyond their previous considerable work on the study of leadership, Kenneth Leithwood, Alma Harris, and Tiiu Strauss now get up-close and detailed. They use their powerful framework for how school leaders influence student learning, but this time they get inside the 'how.' Practical, powerful, interesting, and insightful— an indispensible resource for turnaround leaders." —MICHAEL FULLAN, professor emeritus, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto "The problem of bringing about change in those schools where it is needed most remains one of the most intractable challenges in school leadership. This book is written by international scholars who understand the complexities of this challenge. Unlike other volumes based on a single person's experience or a reading of the literature, these authors offer useful specific insights based on data about what leaders in schools that accomplish fundamental change actually do." —PHILIP HALLINGER, Chair Professor of Leadership and Change, Hong Kong Institute of Education

Leading Schools to Success

Constructing and Sustaining High-Performing Learning Cultures

Leading Schools to Success

What's missing in education reform in the United States? The answer is leadership; specifically, the ability of school and district leaders to construct and continually nurture a culture of sustained high performance. A true leader needs to have not only a vision of the desired culture, but the skills and information necessary to make that vision a reality. Providing a combined 70 years of classroom and administrative experience, renowned authors James Guthrie and Patrick Schuermann offer a practice-based approach, grounded in research and theory, to achieving and maintaining an atmosphere of success in schools through effective leadership.

School Turnaround in Secondary Schools

Possibilities, Complexities, & Sustainability

School Turnaround in Secondary Schools

In the continuing quest to turnaround the lowest performing schools, rapid and sustainable reform, or school turnaround, seems most elusive for secondary schools. Secondary schools are rife with challenges due to their wide-ranging mission and organizational complexity. With the continued emphasis on college and career readiness and the vast learning possibilities enhanced by technology, our third book in this series, Contemporary Perspectives on School Turnaround and Reform, focuses on rapid school turnaround and reform in secondary schools. In this edited volume, researchers and scholars consider the doubly perplexing challenge of school turnaround or the rapid improvement of the lowest-performing secondary schools. Although there is some evidence that school turnaround policy can impact student achievement scores, research across international contexts seldom identifies schools that substantially changed student learning trajectories and sustained them. Separately, many societies have found improving secondary schools a relatively intractable problem for multiple reasons, including school size and complexity, the micropolitics of teaching and leading within them, and cumulative widening student achievement gaps. In combination, there are almost no examples of low-performing secondary schools turning around. The chapters in this book begin to offer some hope about how policymakers, practitioners, and researchers might begin to reconceptualize how they engage in and undertake the work of rapidly improving low-performing secondary schools. The authors provide theoretical and conceptual advancements, offer lessons learned from both successful and unsuccessful initiatives, and address practical issues with potentially accessible ways forward.

Enduring Myths That Inhibit School Turnaround

Enduring Myths That Inhibit School Turnaround

The concept of school turnaround—rapidly improving schools and increasing student achievement outcomes in a short period of time—has become politicized despite the relative newness of the idea. Unprecedented funding levels for school improvement combined with few examples of schools substantially increasing student achievement outcomes has resulted in doubt about whether or not turnaround is achievable. Skeptics have enumerated a number of reasons to abandon school turnaround at this early juncture. This book is the first in a new series on school turnaround and reform intended to spur ongoing dialogue among and between researchers, policymakers, and practitioners on improving the lowestperforming schools and the systems in which they operate. The “turnaround challenge” remains salient regardless of what we call it. We must improve the nation’s lowestperforming schools for many moral, social, and economic reasons. In this first book, education researchers and scholars have identified a number of myths that have inhibited our ability to successfully turn schools around. Our intention is not to suggest that if these myths are addressed school turnaround will always be achieved. Business and other literatures outside of education make it clear that turnaround is, at best, difficult work. However, for a number of reasons, we in education have developed policies and practices that are often antithetical to turnaround. Indeed, we are making already challenging work harder. The myths identified in this book suggest that we still struggle to define or understand what we mean by turnaround or how best, or even adequately, measure whether it has been achieved. Moreover, it is clear that there are a number of factors limiting how effectively we structure and support lowperforming schools both systemically and locally. And we have done a rather poor job of effectively leveraging human resources to raise student achievement and improve organizational outcomes. We anticipate this book having wide appeal for researchers, policymakers, and practitioners in consideration of how to support these schools taking into account context, root causes of lowperformance, and the complex work to ensure their opportunity to be successful. Too frequently we have expected these schools to turn themselves around while failing to assist them with the vision and supports to realize meaningful, lasting organizational change. The myths identified and debunked in this book potentially illustrate a way forward.

Teachers' Guide to School Turnarounds

Teachers' Guide to School Turnarounds

Most guides to the process of turning around low-performing schools are written for principals and policy makers. Teachers, however, are the individuals expected to conduct the “heavy lifting” of school improvement. Teachers’ Guide to School Improvement is the first book on the subject written expressly for teachers. In this expanded second edition, teachers are shown a step-by-step process for raising student achievement, beginning with the diagnosis of the causes of low achievement and extending through the crucial first year of turnaround and beyond. Examples of effective turnaround practices are drawn from a variety of elementary, middle, and high schools.

Differentiating School Leadership

Facing the Challenges of Practice

Differentiating School Leadership

Diagnose your school’s critical challenges and apply specific differentiated leadership strategies for improvement! Whether yours is an urban or a rural school, every setting faces unique types of challenges requiring an appropriate and differentiated response. This book introduces the qualities of differentiated leadership and stresses the importance of understanding that different schools can face very distinct sets of challenges. The author provides principals with an overview of “organizational diagnostics” with guidelines for identifying critical issues and demonstrates how to apply differentiated leadership to four high-level priorities: Preventing school decline Turning around a low-performing school Sustaining improvements Designing a new school

Leading With Teacher Emotions in Mind

Leading With Teacher Emotions in Mind

This research-based study helps administrators create a school environment that responds to teacher emotions and results in higher teacher retention, instructional effectiveness, and student achievement.

Making Schools Smarter

Leading With Evidence

Making Schools Smarter

Achieve a workable model for effectively reshaping today's school districts for positive outcomes by addressing three of the most central challenges in district and school leadership.

International Perspectives on Leading Low-Performing Schools

International Perspectives on Leading Low-Performing Schools

Research is clear: School leadership quality matters. However, our knowledge of effective school leadership remains limited in at least three substantial ways. First, our understanding of school leadership effectiveness generally and school principal effectiveness specifically is limited to Western contexts, primarily North America and western European ones. Second, even in the confines of Western research and context, there has been relatively little specific focus on effectively leading low-performing schools. Third, even the conceptualization of leadership—do we mean the school principal, an administrative team, or a broader school leadership team—is a key factor in how we define and respond to the challenge of leading in low-performing schools. This book advances discussion and disseminates knowledge and global perspectives on what school leadership looks like, how it is enacted and under what circumstances, and when or where lessons might be portable. We anticipate this book having wide appeal for researchers, policymakers, and practitioners considering school leadership and how to support it effectively. The chapters suggest a noticeable level of convergence globally on how to lead low-performing schools effectively. Yet, there are clear political and culture differences that add significant gradation to how school leaders might enact best practice locally or inform policymakers and systems leaders about how to set up school leaders for success and subsequently support them. This book is one of the first that prioritizes the universality and nuance of leading low-performing schools globally.