KODOKAN JUDO THROWING TECHNIQUES

Focusing on Kodokan Judo, this book contains full descriptions of all 67 throws, with variations and practice guides.

KODOKAN JUDO THROWING TECHNIQUES

Focusing on Kodokan Judo, this book contains full descriptions of all 67 throws, with variations and practice guides. In addition, it details the origins of some techniques, using old and rare photos of Kano in action. It is suitable for all judo practitioners. The author was a 3-times Olympic Judo champion in his youth, and became the chief instructor of Kodokan - the official Judo headquarters. This book is the successor to the perennial bestseller Kodokan Judo', by the founder Jigoro Kano, and contains full descriptions of all 67 throws, with variations and'

Judo Formal Techniques

A new foreword by Judo instructor Neil Ohlenkamp sheds light on the book's lasting importance as the classic "Kata bible" for Judo students and instructors alike and an indispensable resource for all martial arts practitioners.

Judo Formal Techniques

Judo Formal Techniques is "The most detailed explanation of Judo that has ever been published" (The Japan Times). A comprehensive training manual to the basic "free practice" forms of Kodokan Judo (the Randori no Kata), the book provides essential instruction in the throwing and grappling kata (Nage no Kata and Katame no Kata) that every Judo practitioner needs to master. The authors are two of the world's top instructors—Donn F. Draeger and Tadao Otaki. Both were instructors at the Kodokan Judo Institute in Tokyo—the headquarters of international Judo, which was founded by the creator of the martial art, Jigoro Kano. Draeger, considered by many to be the first non-Japanese Budo master, was an authority on Asian martial culture who held high ranks and teaching licenses in several martial arts. He was a prolific writer and was the first non-Japanese Judo instructor at the Kodokan. Otaki was not only a successful Judo instructor but also a university professor who was widely praised for his research on the role of Judo in education. Draeger and Otaki based their text on Jigoro Kano's published and unpublished personal writings. Recapturing the original spirit and intent of the essential Judo kata, they are presented in the standard Kodokan versions as refined by generations of practitioners. Richly illustrated with over 1,000 photos and drawings, Judo Formal Techniques offers complete step-by-step instructions for the roles of both training partners. In addition to the core techniques of throwing and grappling, it explains the important transitional movements as well as grips, stances, and postures. First introduced as an Olympic sport at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, Judo is returning to its home city on the world stage at the 2020 Olympics. Practiced by more than 20 million people worldwide, Judo is only expected to continue growing in popularity. A new foreword by Judo instructor Neil Ohlenkamp sheds light on the book's lasting importance as the classic "Kata bible" for Judo students and instructors alike and an indispensable resource for all martial arts practitioners.

The Judo Handbook

Nage no kata : a set of Kodokan Judo formal throwing techniques . Katame no
kata : a set of Kodokan Judo formal groundwork techniques . Go no sen no kata :
a set of Kodokan Judo formal counter - throwing ( reactive ) techniques .

The Judo Handbook

Explains the history, steps, and training of judo.

The Teaching of Judo An Instructor s Handbook

Cunningham, Steven R. “Judo: Morality and the Physical Art.” Presentation at the
1988 National Coaches Conference, OTC, Colorado Springs, Colorado, 1998.
Daigo, Toshiro. Kodokan Judo Throwing Techniques. Tokyo, Japan: Kodansha ...

The Teaching of Judo  An Instructor s Handbook

The Teaching of Judo is a guide for instructors, coaches, judoka, and parents. Presented from an educator's perspective, this book contains the knowledge gleaned from forty years of experience in teaching judo, and includes the qualities, structure, and situations to avoid.

Hidden in Plain Sight

teenage Olympians of recent years, renowned for his yama-arashi ('mountain
storm'), a 'lost' technique, allegedly derived from Daitōryū. The problem with this
... 202 and by Daigo Toshiro in Kodokan Jūdō Throwing Techniques, pp. 76–78.

Hidden in Plain Sight

Ellis Amdur's writing on martial arts has been groundbreaking. In Dueling with O-sensei, he challenged practitioners that the moral dimension of martial arts is expressed in acts of integrity, not spiritual platitudes and the deification of fantasized warrior-sages. In Old School, he applied both academic rigor and keen observation towards some of the classical martial arts of Japan, leavening his writing with vivid descriptions of many of the actual practitioners of these wonderful traditions. His first edition of Hidden in Plain Sight was a discussion of esoteric training methods once common, but now all but lost within Japanese martial arts. These methodologies encompassed mental imagery, breath-work, and a variety of physical techniques, offering the potential to develop skills and power sometimes viewed as nearly superhuman. Usually believed to be the provenance of Chinese martial arts, Amdur asserted that elements of such training still remain within a few martial traditions: literally, 'hidden in plain sight.' Two-thirds larger, this second edition is so much more. Amdur digs deep into the past, showing the complexity of human strength, its adaptation to varying lifestyles, and the nature of physical culture pursued for martial ends. Amdur goes into detail concerning varieties of esoteric power training within martial arts, culminating in a specific methodology known as 'six connections' or 'internal strength.' With this discussion as a baseline, he then discusses the transfer of esoteric power training from China to various Japanese jujutsu systems as well as Japanese swordsman-ship emanating from the Kurama traditions. Finally, he delves into the innovative martial tradition of Daito-ryu and its most important offshoot, aikido, showing how the mercurial, complicated figures of Takeda Sokaku and Morihei Ueshiba were less the embodiment of something new, than a re-imagining of their past.

Black Belt

BJ1 — $2.95 The Sport of Judo, Kobayashi & Sharp. Highly praised by the
Kodokan of Japan. Presents, step-by-step, the throwing, grappling, and
strangling techniques of Judo. Paper back. BJ2 — $2.95 A Complete Guide to
Judo, Smith.

Black Belt

The oldest and most respected martial arts title in the industry, this popular monthly magazine addresses the needs of martial artists of all levels by providing them with information about every style of self-defense in the world - including techniques and strategies. In addition, Black Belt produces and markets over 75 martial arts-oriented books and videos including many about the works of Bruce Lee, the best-known marital arts figure in the world.

Journal of Asian Martial Arts

Judo : A sport and a way of life . Seoul : International Judo Federation . DAIGO , T
. ( 2005 ) . Kodokan Judo throwing techniques . Tokyo : Kodansha International .
DEMENTE , B. ( 2003 ) . Kata : The key to understanding and dealing with the ...

Journal of Asian Martial Arts


The Way of Judo

It is safe to say that Uchida was not teaching the Kodokan judo of Kano, but his
own mixture of the Uchida ryu system of weapons and lethal jujutsu techniques,
with perhaps a few Kodokan judo throws added. Also, it seems that Uchida was ...

The Way of Judo

Kodokan judo, one of the most well-known martial arts in the world today, was originated by Jigoro Kano (1860–1938), a martial artist and career educator who developed the art after studying several types of jujutsu, sumo, and Western wrestling. Openness and refinement were hallmarks of his personal and professional style, and he relentlessly searched for the best way to practice, teach, and perform techniques. This biography shows how Kano saw judo as a vehicle not just for self-defense, but for physical, spiritual, and moral development as well. His teachings clearly emphasize his ideal of judo as a way of self-cultivation that leads to physical health, ethical behavior, and ultimately a better society. Kano was a tireless activist who promoted the practical application of judo’s principles in all realms of life—in one’s personal behavior, for education, in work, for economic benefit, and in both the local and international political arenas. Kano’s students were a colorful, sometimes notorious bunch, and this book reveals how several went on to become famous—or infamous—in their own right. They include a prime minister of Japan, the leader of the Communist party in China, a famous novelist, a spy, high-level military leaders, and a media mogul, among many others.

Koryu Bujutsu

This is the first scroll that includes a preface of written teachings or discussions,
along with the list of techniques, the lineage, and the date of the license being ...
to represent the theoretical basis of Kodokan judo's throwing techniques.

Koryu Bujutsu


Judo Memoirs of Jigoro Kano

the necessary knowledge that enabled me to unsettle Iikubo's balance and to
succeed in throwing him. ... He further added that he had no more to teach me
and that it would be better for me to continue with my study of throwing
techniques by practicing with my students. ... When one makes a detailed
comparative study of traditional jujutsu with Kodokan judo, big differences
between the two systems ...

Judo Memoirs of Jigoro Kano

In 1882, Kano opened his Kodokan dojo in Tokyo, where he taught jujutsu to his first class of nine students. His choice of the name Kodokan symbolizes precocity in one so young and is highly significant, for it means the institute where one is guided along the road to follow in life, that is to say, a road that one travels as a means of self-cultivation, which Kano regarded as the optimum way to live ones life. This cultivation, however, can only be attained following long years of training made with vigorous exertion in an effort to reach the ultimate goal: self-perfection. At the age of twenty-four, Kano abruptly gave up the teaching of this ancient and altogether brutal activity and never taught jujutsu again. In his attempt to create for the modern age a non-violent, spiritually inspiring antagonistic art, he carried out research on several styles of jujutsu. Primarily in the interests of both safety and practicality, he altered and added his own devices to the techniques that he was later to incorporate into his newly conceived system of skills, which he named Kodokan judo. In lectures, Kano often stated the following: The ultimate object of studying judo is to train and cultivate body and mind through practice in attack and defense, and by thus mastering the essentials of the art, to attain perfection of oneself and bring benefits to the world. He had sought to create in judo, therefore, something positive out of something largely negative.