Killing Patton

The Strange Death of World War II's Most Audacious General

Killing Patton

Readers around the world have thrilled to Killing Lincoln, Killing Kennedy, and Killing Jesus--riveting works of nonfiction that journey into the heart of the most famous murders in history. Now from Bill O'Reilly, iconic anchor of The O'Reilly Factor, comes the most epic book of all in this multimillion-selling series: Killing Patton. General George S. Patton, Jr. died under mysterious circumstances in the months following the end of World War II. For almost seventy years, there has been suspicion that his death was not an accident--and may very well have been an act of assassination. Killing Patton takes readers inside the final year of the war and recounts the events surrounding Patton's tragic demise, naming names of the many powerful individuals who wanted him silenced.

Patton

Battling with History

Patton

General George S. Patton Jr. is one of the most successful yet misunderstood figures in American military history. Despite the many books and articles written about him, none considers in depth how his love of history shaped the course of his life. In this thematic biography, Furman Daniel traces Patton’s obsession with history and argues that it informed and contributed to many of his successes, both on and off the battlefield. Patton deliberately cultivated the image of himself as a warrior from ages past; the more interesting truth is that he was an exceptionally dedicated student of history. He was a hard worker and voracious reader who gave a great deal of thought to how military history might inform his endeavors. Most scholars have overlooked this element of Patton’s character, which Daniel argues is essential to understanding the man’s genius.

Conservatives and the Constitution

Imagining Constitutional Restoration in the Heyday of American Liberalism

Conservatives and the Constitution

Since the 1980s, a ritualized opposition in legal thought between a conservative 'originalism' and a liberal 'living constitutionalism' has obscured the aggressively contested tradition committed to, and mobilization of arguments for, constitutional restoration and redemption within the broader postwar American conservative movement. Conservatives and the Constitution is the first history of the political and intellectual trajectory of this foundational tradition and mobilization. By looking at the deep stories told either by identity groups or about what conservatives took to be flashpoint topics in the postwar period, Ken I. Kersch seeks to capture the developmental and integrative nature of postwar constitutional conservatism, challenging conservatives and liberals alike to more clearly see and understand both themselves and their presumed political and constitutional opposition. Conservatives and the Constitution makes a unique contribution to our understanding of modern American conservatism, and to the constitutional thought that has, in critical ways, informed and defined it.

Operation Wappen

A War That Never Was

Operation Wappen

This is a short story spanning two years from 1956 to 1958. It includes the author’s Marine Corps service as a Second Lieutenant artillery forward observer attached to Third Battalion Sixth Marine Regiment led by Colonel Austin C. “Shifty” Shofner (one of only nine men ever to escape a Japanese prisoner of war camp). It describes the maturation of Phase III warfare—the landing by helicopter of an intact infantry battalion ready to fight behind enemy lines (Operation Deep Water) and the beginnings of Phase IV warfare with the return of knights to the battlefield (Yasser Arafat/eventually Osama bin Landen) and an MI6/CIA joint clandestine, frustrated effort to overthrow the Syrian government (Operation Wappen).

Killing Lincoln

The Shocking Assassination that Changed America Forever

Killing Lincoln

A riveting historical narrative of the heart-stopping events surrounding the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and the first work of history from mega-bestselling author Bill O'Reilly The iconic anchor of The O'Reilly Factor recounts one of the most dramatic stories in American history—how one gunshot changed the country forever. In the spring of 1865, the bloody saga of America's Civil War finally comes to an end after a series of increasingly harrowing battles. President Abraham Lincoln's generous terms for Robert E. Lee's surrender are devised to fulfill Lincoln's dream of healing a divided nation, with the former Confederates allowed to reintegrate into American society. But one man and his band of murderous accomplices, perhaps reaching into the highest ranks of the U.S. government, are not appeased. In the midst of the patriotic celebrations in Washington D.C., John Wilkes Booth—charismatic ladies' man and impenitent racist—murders Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre. A furious manhunt ensues and Booth immediately becomes the country's most wanted fugitive. Lafayette C. Baker, a smart but shifty New York detective and former Union spy, unravels the string of clues leading to Booth, while federal forces track his accomplices. The thrilling chase ends in a fiery shootout and a series of court-ordered executions—including that of the first woman ever executed by the U.S. government, Mary Surratt. Featuring some of history's most remarkable figures, vivid detail, and page-turning action, Killing Lincoln is history that reads like a thriller.

Killing Patton by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard - A 30-minute Instaread Summary

The Strange Death of World War II's Most Audacious General

Killing Patton by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard - A 30-minute Instaread Summary

PLEASE NOTE: This is a summary of the book and NOT the original book. Killing Patton by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard - A 30-minute Instaread Summary Inside this Instaread Summary: • Overview of the entire book • Introduction to the important people in the book • Summary and analysis of all the chapters in the book • Key Takeaways of the book • A Reader's Perspective Preview of this summary:Chapter 1 On October 3, 1944, Patton’s forces were fighting for Fort Driant, a heavily fortified German position near the French town of Metz. The men of his Third Army were inspired a few months earlier by his speech before D-Day, in which Patton told them that Americans do not lose. Up to that point, Patton had never lost a battle. Patton’s men both loved and feared him. He was known for salty language, which he said he used because he wanted to speak as his men did. The battle at Metz went wrong. Contrary to Patton’s intelligence, the German defenders were tough veterans and their position was well protected. Patton was short on troops, supplies and ammunition. General Dwight D. Eisenhower, the supreme commander of allied troops in Europe, ordered Patton to stand down so that British forces under Bernard Law Montgomery could lead the offensive into Germany. This was a political decision to honor British’s sacrifice during the war, but Patton was angry over being left out and Eisenhower’s decision to cut back his supplies. Patton thought his forces and Montgomery’s should move into Germany at the same time. Patton remained determined to take Driant and Metz. Unfortunately, his forces suffered severe casualties and he was forced to back down. He believed Eisenhower’s cuts caused his first defeat. Eisenhower’s order gave the Germans an opportunity to mount a counteroffensive. Their leader, Adolf Hitler, feared Patton especially and wanted to keep him away from this particular battlefield...

The New Moral World

The New Moral World

A London weekly publication, developing the principles of the rational system of society. Conducted by Robert Owen and his disciples.