John Dee and the Empire of Angels

Enochian Magick and the Occult Roots of the Modern World

John Dee and the Empire of Angels

A comprehensive look at the life and continuing influence of 16th-century scientific genius and occultist Dr. John Dee • Presents an overview of Dee’s scientific achievements, intelligence and spy work, imperial strategizing, and his work developing methods to communicate with angels • Pieces together Dee’s fragmentary Spirit Diaries and examines Enochian in precise detail and the angels’ plan to establish a New World Order • Explores Dee’s influence on Sir Francis Bacon, modern science, Rosicrucianism, and 20th-century occultists such as Jack Parsons, Aleister Crowley, and Anton LaVey Dr. John Dee (1527-1608), Queen Elizabeth I’s court advisor and astrologer, was the foremost scientific genius of the 16th century. Laying the foundation for modern science, he actively promoted mathematics and astronomy as well as made advances in navigation and optics that helped elevate England to the foremost imperial power in the world. Centuries ahead of his time, his theoretical work included the concept of light speed and prototypes for telescopes and solar panels. Dee, the original “007” (his crown-given moniker), even invented the idea of a “British Empire,” envisioning fledgling America as the new Atlantis, himself as Merlin, and Elizabeth as Arthur. But, as Jason Louv explains, Dee was suppressed from mainstream history because he spent the second half of his career developing a method for contacting angels. After a brilliant ascent from star student at Cambridge to scientific advisor to the Queen, Dee, with the help of a disreputable, criminal psychic named Edward Kelley, devoted ten years to communing with the angels and archangels of God. These spirit communications gave him the keys to Enochian, the language that mankind spoke before the fall from Eden. Piecing together Dee’s fragmentary Spirit Diaries and scrying sessions, the author examines Enochian in precise detail and explains how the angels used Dee and Kelley as agents to establish a New World Order that they hoped would unify all monotheistic religions and eventually dominate the entire globe. Presenting a comprehensive overview of Dee’s life and work, Louv examines his scientific achievements, intelligence and spy work, imperial strategizing, and Enochian magick, establishing a psychohistory of John Dee as a singular force and fundamental driver of Western history. Exploring Dee’s influence on Sir Francis Bacon, the development of modern science, 17th-century Rosicrucianism, the 19th-century occult revival, and 20th-century occultists such as Jack Parsons, Aleister Crowley, and Anton LaVey, Louv shows how John Dee continues to impact science and the occult to this day.

John Dee's Conversations with Angels

Cabala, Alchemy, and the End of Nature

John Dee's Conversations with Angels

This book is about Elizabethan England's most famous 'scientist' or natural philosopher John Dee and his 'conversations with angels'.

Atlantis Rising Magazine - 132 November/December 2018

Atlantis Rising Magazine - 132 November/December 2018

FUTURE TECH SATELLITE WARS AND MORE The Coming Struggle for Military Dominance in Outer Space BY STEVEN SORA LOST HISTORY THE HEAT OF BATTLE Who Turned Ancient Hill Forts to Glass? BY FRANK JOSEPH FORBIDDEN SCIENCE EINSTEIN & THE QUEST FOR AN "ETHER" Is There More Substance Here than Meets the Eye? BY CHARLES SHAHAR HIDDEN HISTORY THE QUEEN‘S ‘MAGICIAN‘ The Curious Story of Dr. John Dee and the Empire of Angels BY JASON LOUV ALTERNATIVE ARCHAEOLOGY NEWGRANGE AND THE IRISH ‘PASSAGE TOMBS‘ Has Their True Age Been Drastically Underestimated? ROBERT M. SCHOCH, Ph.D. ANCIENT MYSTERIES THE EXODUS IN A NEW LIGHT Fresh Evidence of Real History for the Biblical Account BY JONATHON PERRIN THE UNEXPLAINED CROP CIRCLE QUESTIONS STILL UNANSWERED! As Implications Multiply, Real Explanations Are Hard to Find BY WILLIAM B. STOECKER CONSCIOUSNESS PHILIP K. DICK & RESHAPING THE ‘MATRIX‘ Searching for Reality Behind the Computer Simulations BY SEAN CASTEEL THE UNEXPLAINED THE PRIEST WHO SAID HE COULD TIME-TRAVEL Was Father Ernetti Lying, or Did the Vatican of the 1950s Have Something to Hide? BY JOHN CHAMBERS THE UNEXPLAINED THE CASE OF CORA SCOTT RICHMOND? Nearly Two Centuries Later, Her Story Still Arouses Debate BY MICHAEL E. TYMN THE FORBIDDEN ARCHAEOLOGIST FREIBERG‘S SKULL-IN-COAL CONTROVERSY BY MICHAEL A. CREMO ASTROLOGY THE SKY GOD‘S QUEST FOR FIRE Jupiter in Sagittarius, November 2018–December 2019 BY JULIE LOAR PUBLISHER‘S LETTER PARABLES OF THE CAVES BY J. DOUGLAS KENYON

John Dee's Five Books of Mystery

Original Sourcebook of Enochian Magic

John Dee's Five Books of Mystery

Discovered in a hidden compartment of an old chest long after his death, the secret writings of John Dee, one of the leading scientists and occultists of Elizabethan England, record in minute detail his research into the occult. Dee concealed his treatises on the nature of humankind's contact with angelic realms and languages throughout his life, and they were nearly lost forever. In his brief biography of John Dee, Joseph Peterson calls him a "true Renaissance man"? detailing his work in astronomy, mathematics, navigation, the arts, astrology, and the occult sciences. He was even thought to be the model for Shakespeare's Prospero. All this was preparation for Dee's main achievement: five books, revealed and transcribed between March 1582 and May 1583, bringing to light mysteries and truths that scholars and adepts have been struggling to understand and use ever since. These books detail his system for communicating with the angels, and reveal that the angels were interested in and involved with the exploration and colonization of the New World, and in heralding in a new age or new world order. While Dee's influence was certainly felt in his lifetime, his popularity has grown tremendously since. His system was used and adapted by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, and subsequently by Aleister Crowley. This new edition of John Dee's Five Books of Mystery is by far the most accessible and complete published to date. Peterson has translated Latin terms and added copious footnotes, putting the instructions and references into context for the modern reader.

The Arch Conjuror of England

John Dee

The Arch Conjuror of England

Outlandish alchemist and magician, political intelligencer, apocalyptic prophet, and converser with angels, John Dee (1527–1609) was one of the most colorful and controversial figures of the Tudor world. In this fascinating book—the first full-length biography of Dee based on primary historical sources—Glyn Parry explores Dee's vast array of political, magical, and scientific writings and finds that they cast significant new light on policy struggles in the Elizabethan court, conservative attacks on magic, and Europe's religious wars. John Dee was more than just a fringe magus, Parry shows: he was a major figure of the Reformation and Renaissance.

The Life of Dr. John Dee (1527 - 1608)

The Life of Dr. John Dee (1527 - 1608)

John Dee was a much respected mathematician, astronomer, astrologer, occultist, alchemist and adviser to Queen Elizabeth I, but subsequently derided as a conjurer and a trickster. Dee became Queen Elizabeth's trusted advisor on astrological and scientific matters, choosing her coronation date himself. From the 1550s through the 1570s, he served as an advisor to England's voyages of discovery, providing technical assistance in navigation and ideological backing in the creation of a ""British Empire"" Dee's library, at 4000 volumes, was the largest philosophical and scientific library collection in Elizabethan England. Queen Elizabeth finally made him Warden of Christ's College, Manchester, in 1595

Guardian of the Vision

Merlin's Descendants #3

Guardian of the Vision

Religious wars mar the glory of the early years of Queen Elizabeth I reign. A descendant of Merlin and King Arthur must step forward and show the world that you can put faith before politics. The glory of the Elizabethan Age is tarnished by the continuing religious conflict begun by Henry VIII. Griffin Kirkwood renounces his title, his lands, his love for the mysterious demon-ridden Roanna, and his magical heritage as a descendant of both King Arthur and the Merlin to become a Catholic priest in France. His twin, Donovan (his mirror image in face and form and rarely more than a thought away) shoulders the responsibilities willingly. He agrees to two arranged-marriages, one after the other, and takes on the outward appearance of whichever religion is dominant to protect all that he loves, but without magic, or the love of his life. Together and separately the twins must fight to guide Queen Elizabeth through the intricate maze of politics and religion. Their spiritual and magical journeys cross each other, oppose, and re-align as they battle internal demons and external threats.

Renaissance Magic

Renaissance Magic

First Published in 1993. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Dream of America

As Seen from Saracen's Head Tavern

The Dream of America

This is the tale of Thomas Jadwin's dream of America. The story occurs during the last half of the reign of England's greatest monarch Elizabeth I and the first decades of her hand-picked successor James I. Thomas' father was a cutler of Welsh ancestry who supplied fine weapons for Nobility. Thomas courts and weds the beautiful and educated fishmonger's daughter, Catherine Pelham. As a wedding gift the Jadwins are given a tenement on the High Street near London Bridge within walking distance of the Bear Baiting Garden and the Globe Theatre. They convert the tenement into a tavern called Saracen's Head. Many of the luminaries of the day, including William Shakespeare, Squanto, and Captain John Smith, come to Saracen's Head to hear the news and raise a tankard of Southwark ale. Inspired by his father's membership in Raleigh's Adventurers for Virginia Thomas buys shares in the company formed to plant the first English colony in America. In this age of famine, plague, war, and the Reformation, Thomas comes to see America as the place where a reconstitution of human society might occur. He actually makes the journey across the Atlantic to the newly founded colony at Jamestown with the Third Supply on the ill-fated Sea Venture.

The Secret History of the Hell-Fire Clubs

From Rabelais and John Dee to Anton LaVey and Timothy Leary

The Secret History of the Hell-Fire Clubs

An exploration of the origins, influences, and legacy of the scandalous Hell-Fire Clubs of the 18th century and beyond • Reveals the club’s origins in the work of Rabelais and the magical practices of John Dee and how their motto, “Do What You Will,” deeply influenced Aleister Crowley • Explores the cross-fertilization of liberty and libertinage within these clubs that influenced both U.S. and French Revolutions • Examines the debaucherous activities and famous members of many Hell-Fire Clubs, including Sir Francis Dashwood’s Monks of Medmenham Mention the Hell-Fire Clubs and you conjure up an image of aristocratic rakes cutting a swath through the village maidens. Which is true, but not the whole truth. The activities of these clubs of upper-class Englishmen revolved around not only debauchery but also blasphemy, ritual, quasi-magical pursuits, and political intrigue. Providing a history of these infamous clubs, Geoffrey Ashe reveals their origins in the work of François Rabelais and the activities of John Dee. He shows how the Hell-Fire Clubs’ anything-goes philosophy of “Do what you will”--also Aleister Crowley’s famous motto--and community template were drawn directly from Rabelais. The author looks at the very first Hell-Fire Club, founded by Philip, Duke of Wharton, in 1720 and then at the Society of the Dilettanti, a fraternity formed in 1732. Ashe examines the life, travels, and influences of Sir Francis Dashwood, founding member of the Society of the Dilettanti and the scandalous Permissive Society at Medmenham, also known as the Monks of Medmenham. He also explores other Hell-Fire clubs the movement inspired throughout England, Scotland, and Ireland, including the violence-prone Mohocks and the Appalling Club. He shows how many illustrious figures of the day were members of these societies, such as Lord Byron. He also examines the rumors that Benjamin Franklin was a member, an allegation that can be neither confirmed nor denied. Exploring the political and magical ideas that fueled this movement, the author shows how the cross-fertilization of liberty and libertinage within the Hell-Fire Clubs went on to influence both the U.S. and French revolutions, as well as the hippie movement of the 1960s, the Church of Satan founded by Anton LaVey, and the motorcycle club known as the Hells Angels. The legacy of the Hell-Fire Clubs continues to impact society, beckoning both elite and outsider to cast aside social norms and “do what you will.”