John Baldessari

Pure Beauty

John Baldessari

"John Boldessari: Pure Beauty, the most comprehensive volume to date on this legendary California artist, features more than 240 illustrations. Eleven insightfuL essays, by critics, curators, art historians, and an artist and former student, illuminate many aspects of Baldessari's oeuvre and provide a context for the artist's extraordinary contribution to twentieth and twenty-first century art. Few contemporary artists have achieved Baldessari's range and relevance and this stunning volume, with its expansive reproductions and substantial text, provides the definitive look at an artist who has engagingly challenged our very ways of seeing." --Book Jacket.

Pure Beauty

John Baldessari

Pure Beauty

A major figure in contemporary art, John Baldessari is widely considered one of the most influential artists to emerge since the mid-1960s. From his early text-and-image paintings to his more recent photo collages and installations, Baldessari has continued to make art that addresses the social impact of mass culture, often playfully through strategies of appropriation and deconstruction. Baldessari's lifelong interest in language, written and visual, and the interaction between the two, raises questions about the nature of communication and perception. More than 400 illustrations are presented in full colour in this monograph published in conjunction with a major exhibition organised by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and Tate Modern in London. Eleven essays by critics, curators, art historians, and an artist and former student of Baldessari's round out this volume. Few contemporary artists have achieved the range and relevance of Baldessari's oeuvre, which is finally given its due in this elegant retrospective book.

Meta- and Inter-Images in Contemporary Visual Art and Culture

Meta- and Inter-Images in Contemporary Visual Art and Culture

Exploring the epistemological potential of meta- and inter-images Since the 1990s, when the question of the visual became central in various arts and humanities disciplines, images that refer to themselves as such or to other images have enjoyed an increasing interest. Meta- and Inter-Images in Contemporary Visual Art and Culture partakes in, enriches and updates these debates. It investigates what meta- and inter-images can make known about the visual, in its own terms, by its own means. Written by scholars in aesthetics, art history, and cultural, film, literary, media, and visual studies, the essays gathered here tackle meta- and inter-images in an array of creative artefacts, practices, and media. They unfold the epistemological potential of every meta- and inter-image discussed to raise questions such as: What are images? How do they work? By whom, to what purpose, to what effect and in what context/s are they used? How are they created and understood? And how do they challenge our (pre)conceptions of images and the ways we study them? Contributors Maaheen Ahmed (Université catholique de Louvain), Vangelis Athanassopoulos (Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne), Sotirios Bahtsetzis (Hellenic Open University), Concepción Cortés Zulueta (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid), Mafalda Dâmaso (Goldsmiths, University of London), Elisabeth-Christine Gamer (University of Bern), Amanda Gluibizzi (Ohio State University), Stella Hockenhull (University of Wolverhampton), Anaël Lejeune (Université catholique de Louvain), Fabrice Leroy (University of Louisiana at Lafayette), Johanna Malt (King’s College London), Olga Moskatova (IKKM, Bauhaus-Universität Weimar), Magdalena Nowak (The Graduate School for Social Research at the Polish Academy of Sciences), Jorgelina Orfila (Texas Tech University), Fran Pheasant-Kelly (University of Wolverhampton), Raphaël Pirenne (School of Graphic Research, E.R.G. Brussels), Abigail Susik (Willamette University)

Creating the Future

Art and Los Angeles in the 1970s

Creating the Future

Conceived as a challenge to long-standing conventional wisdom, Creating the Future is a work of social history/cultural criticism that examines the premise that the progress of art in Los Angeles ceased during the 1970s—after the decline of the Ferus Gallery, the scattering of its stable of artists (Robert Irwin, Ed Kienholz, Ed Moses, Ed Rusha and others), and the economic struggles throughout the decade—and didn’t resume until sometime around 1984 when Mark Tansey, Alison Saar, Judy Fiskin, Carrie Mae Weems, David Salle, Manuel Ocampo, among others became stars in an exploding art market. However, this is far from the reality of the L.A. art scene in the 1970s. The passing of those fashionable 1960s-era icons, in fact, allowed the development of a chaotic array of outlandish and independent voices, marginalized communities, and energetic, sometimes bizarre visions that thrived during the stagnant 1970s. Fallon’s narrative describes and celebrates, through twelve thematically arranged chapters, the wide range of intriguing artists and the world—not just the objects—they created. He reveals the deeper, more culturally dynamic truth about a significant moment in American art history, presenting an alternative story of stubborn creativity in the face of widespread ignorance and misapprehension among the art cognoscenti, who dismissed the 1970s in Los Angeles as a time of dissipation and decline. Coming into being right before their eyes was an ardent local feminist art movement, which had lasting influence on the direction of art across the nation; an emerging Chicano Art movement, spreading Chicano murals across Los Angeles and to other major cities; a new and more modern vision for the role and look of public art; a slow consolidation of local street sensibilities, car fetishism, gang and punk aesthetics into the earliest version of what would later become the “Lowbrow” art movement; the subversive co-opting, in full view of Pop Art, of the values, aesthetics, and imagery of Tinseltown by a number of young and innovative local artists who would go on to greater national renown; and a number of independent voices who, lacking the support structures of an art movement or artist cohort, pursued their brilliant artistic visions in near-isolation. Despite the lack of attention, these artists would later reemerge as visionary signposts to many later trends in art. Their work would prove more interesting, more lastingly influential, and vastly more important than ever imagined or expected by those who saw it or even by those who created it in 1970’s Los Angeles. Creating the Future is a visionary work that seeks to recapture this important decade and its influence on today’s generation of artists.

Language in the Visual Arts

The Interplay of Text and Imagery

Language in the Visual Arts

This book discusses text and image relationships in the history of art from ancient times to the contemporary period across a diversity of cultures and geographic areas. Focusing on the use of words in art and words as art forms, thematic chapters include "Pictures in Words/Words in Pictures," "Word/Picture Puzzles," "Picture/Word Puzzles," "Words as Images," "The Power of the Word," and "Monumental and Moving Words." Chapter subsections further explore cross-cultural themes. Examining text and image relationships from the obvious to the elusive, the puzzling to the profound, the minor to the major, the book demonstrates the diverse ways in which images and writing have been combined through the ages, and explores the interplay between visual and written communication in a wide range of thought-provoking examples. A color insert is included.

Photography and the Art of Chance

Photography and the Art of Chance

As anyone who has wielded a camera knows, photography has a unique relationship to chance. It also represents a struggle to reconcile aesthetic aspiration with a mechanical process. Robin Kelsey reveals how daring innovators expanded the aesthetic limits of photography in order to create art for a modern world.

John Baldessari

A Print Retrospective from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

John Baldessari

Text by Hunter Drohojowska-Philip.

John Baldessari

John Baldessari


John Baldessari

A Catalogue Raisonné of Prints and Multiples, 1971-2007

John Baldessari

John Baldessari, conceptual artist and teacher, has lived and worked in California all his life. Considered a pioneer of postmodern ideas in the 1970s, he came to prominence with his early text paintings and moved on to photographic images paired with text. He has maintained his interest in the relationship of words and imagery, of delighting in the absurd, and pointing out the irony in contemporary art theory for more than 35 years. Baldessari has been active as a printmaker since 1970; The Prints of John Baldessari, A Catalogue Raison marks the first comprehensive accounting of this tremendous body of work and the influence this artist has had on the international art world. AUTHORS: Sharon Coplan Hurowitz is a New York-based art consultant and prints researcher. Wendy Weitman, until 2007, was curator in the Department of Prints and Illustrated Books at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, where she had worked since 1980. In addition to curating a number of important exhibitions, Ms. Weitman has taught and lectured widely on prints in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. SELLING POINTS: The first definitive study of print work of this prolific artist's career that has spanned nearly forty years Baldessari is a recipient of the Americans for the Arts' Lifetime Achievement Award This publication features recently completed work that has never been published 195 colour & 50 b/w illustrations