Irish Writing in the Twentieth Century

A Reader

Irish Writing in the Twentieth Century

Extending to over 1300 pages Irish Writing in the Twentieth Century: A Reader offers a comprehensive and pleasurable introduction to modern Irish literature in a single volume. The Reader contains over 400 pieces including letters, diaries, newspaper and journal articles, songs, poems, critical essays, literary profiles, entire plays and short stories as well as extracts from novels and other longer works. Texts which until now have been out of print or difficult to locate are made easily accessible once more."

Irish Writing

An Anthology of Irish Literature in English 1789-1939

Irish Writing

'Can we not build up a national tradition, a national literature, which shall be none the less Irish in spirit from being English in language?' W. B. YeatsThis anthology traces the history of modern Irish literature from the revolutionary era of the late eighteenth century to the early years of political independence. From Charlotte Brooke and Edmund Burke to Elizabeth Bowen and Louis MacNeice, the anthology shows how, in forging a tradition of theirown, Irish writers have continually challenged and renewed the ways in which Ireland is imagined and defined. The anthology includes a wide-ranging and generous selection of fiction, poetry, and drama. Three plays by W. B. Yeats, Augusta Gregory, and J. M. Synge are printed in their entirety, along with the opening episode of James Joyce's Ulysses. The volume also includes letters, speeches, songs,memoirs, essays, and travel writings, many of which are difficult to obtain elsewhere.'Stephen Regan's anthology vividly and valiantly presents a nation, and a national literature, coming into being.' Paul Muldoon

Irish Writers and Religion

Irish Writers and Religion

Irish writing has been influenced by religion from the beginning; indeed it was the arrival of Christianity which brought Latin orthography, which men of learning adopted. Pagan beliefs were assimilated into Christianity, but not entirely so: a theme which is dealt with in the essay on writing in early Ireland. The relationship between the various Irish Churches and writers in the 18th and 19th centuries is examined as is the influence of folk religion in modern Irish literature. There follow essays on: ghosts, Yeats, Synge, Joyce and Beckett; and on the poets Macneice, Kavanagh and Desmond Egan. Contributors: Lance St. John Butler; Peter Denman; Desmond Egan; Ruth Fleischmann; A. M. Gibbs; Barbara Hayley; Eamonn Hughes; Anne McCartney; Seamus MacMathuna; Joseph McMinn; Nuala ni Dhomhnaill; Mitsuko Ohno; Daithi O Hogain; Alan Peacock; Patricia Rafroidi and Robert Welch. Irish Literary Studies Series No. 37.

Irish Writing

Exile and Subversion

Irish Writing

This is a collection of original essays by international scholars which focuses on Irish writing in English from the eighteenth century to the present. The essays explore the recurrent motif of exile and the subversive potential of Irish writing in political, cultural and literary terms. Case-studies of major writers such as Swift, Joyce, and Heaney are set alongside discussions of relatively unexplored writing such as radical pamphleteering in the age of the French Revolution and the contribution of women writers to Nationalistic journalism.

Exile, Emigration, and Irish Writing

Exile, Emigration, and Irish Writing

Exile, Emigration and Irish Writing is the first book to analyze the experience of exile and emigration in Irish writing. It traces the origin of the concept of exile from Columcille and early Christian Ireland through the centuries to the present. In tracing the origins, mutations and representations of exile and emigration, the author draws on modern post-colonial theory to contribute to the re-reading of Irish writing that is now under way.

Gender in Irish writing

Gender in Irish writing


Irish Writing

Irish Writing


Irish Writing London: Volume 2

Post-War to the Present

Irish Writing London: Volume 2

The presence of Irish writers is almost invisible in literary studies of London. The Irish Writing London redresses the critical deficit. A range of experts on particular Irish writers reflect on the diverse experiences and impact this immigrant group has had on the city. Such sustained attention to a location and concern of Irish writing, long passed over, opens up new terrain to not only reveal but create a history of Irish-London writing. Alongside discussions of MacNeice, Boland and McGahern, the autobiography of Brendan Behan and identity of Irish-language writers in London is considered. Written by an internal array of scholars, these new essays on key figures challenge the deep-seated stereotype of what constitutes the proper domain of Irish writing, producing a study that is both culturally and critically alert and a dynamic contribution to literary criticism of the city.

Strange Country

Modernity and Nationhood in Irish Writing Since 1790

Strange Country

This book traces the emergence of a self-consciously national tradition in Irish writing from the era of the French Revolution and, specifically, from Edmund Burke's counter-revolutionary writings. From Gerald Griffin's The Collegians, to Bram Stoker's Dracula, from James Hardiman's Irish Minstrelsy to Synge, Yeats, and Joyce, Irish writing is dominated by a number of inherited issues - those of national character, of conflict between discipline and excess, of division between the languages of economics and sensibility, of modernity and backwardness. Almost all the activities of Irish print culture - its novels, songs, historical analyses, typefaces, poems - take place within the limits imposed by this complex inheritance. In the process, Ireland created a national literature that was also a colonial one. This was and is an achievement that is only now being fully recognised.