Inoue Enryo

A Philosophical Portrait

Inoue Enryo

The first comprehensive treatment of Inoue Enry?, a pioneer of modern Buddhism and a key figure in the reception of Western philosophy in East Asia. Rainer Schulzer provides the first comprehensive study, in English, of the modern Japanese philosopher Inoue Enry? (1858–1919). Enry? was a key figure in several important intellectual trends in Meiji Japan, including the establishment of academic philosophy, the public campaign against superstition, the permeation of imperial ideology, and the emergence of modern Japanese Buddhism. As one of the most widely read intellectuals of his time and one of the first Japanese authors ever translated into Chinese, an understanding of Enry?’s work and influence is indispensable for understanding modern East Asian intellectual history. His role in spreading the terminology of modern East Asian humanities reveals how later thinkers such as Nishida Kitar? and Suzuki T. Daisetsu emerged; while his key principles, Love of Truth and Protection of Country, illustrate the tensions inherent in Enry?’s enlightenment views and his dedication to the rise of the Japanese empire. The book also presents a systematic reconstruction of what was the first attempt to give Buddhism a sound philosophical foundation for the modern world. “This book is filled with interesting and important details about the unfolding of Enry?’s life and the formation of his major works. Schulzer also develops broader themes in terms of Japan’s intellectual and sociopolitical encounters with the West in light of the advent of its modern self-definition in the context of being part of a global arena for the first time.” — Steven Heine, author of From Chinese Chan to Japanese Zen: A Remarkable Century of Transmission and Transformation

Pandemonium and Parade

Japanese Monsters and the Culture of Yokai

Pandemonium and Parade

Monsters known as yōkai have long haunted the Japanese cultural landscape. This history of the strange and mysterious in Japan seeks out these creatures in folklore, encyclopedias, literature, art, science, games, manga, magazines and movies, exploring their meanings in the Japanese imagination over three centuries.

The Book of Yokai

Mysterious Creatures of Japanese Folklore

The Book of Yokai

Monsters, ghosts, fantastic beings, and supernatural phenomena of all sorts haunt the folklore and popular culture of Japan. Broadly labeled yokai, these creatures come in infinite shapes and sizes, from tengu mountain goblins and kappa water spirits to shape-shifting foxes and long-tongued ceiling-lickers. Currently popular in anime, manga, film, and computer games, many yokai originated in local legends, folktales, and regional ghost stories. Drawing on years of research in Japan, Michael Dylan Foster unpacks the history and cultural context of yokai, tracing their roots, interpreting their meanings, and introducing people who have hunted them through the ages. In this delightful and accessible narrative, readers will explore the roles played by these mysterious beings within Japanese culture and will also learn of their abundance and variety through detailed entries, some with original illustrations, on more than fifty individual creatures. The Book of Yokai provides a lively excursion into Japanese folklore and its ever-expanding influence on global popular culture. It also invites readers to examine how people create, transmit, and collect folklore, and how they make sense of the mysteries in the world around them. By exploring yokai as a concept, we can better understand broader processes of tradition, innovation, storytelling, and individual and communal creativity.

Religion and Psychotherapy in Modern Japan

Religion and Psychotherapy in Modern Japan

Since the late nineteenth century, religious ideas and practices in Japan have become increasingly intertwined with those associated with mental health and healing. This relationship developed against the backdrop of a far broader, and deeply consequential meeting: between Japan’s long-standing, Chinese-influenced intellectual and institutional forms, and the politics, science, philosophy, and religion of the post-Enlightenment West. In striving to craft a modern society and culture that could exist on terms with – rather than be subsumed by – western power and influence, Japan became home to a religion--psy dialogue informed by pressing political priorities and rapidly shifting cultural concerns. This book provides a historically contextualized introduction to the dialogue between religion and psychotherapy in modern Japan. In doing so, it draws out connections between developments in medicine, government policy, Japanese religion and spirituality, social and cultural criticism, regional dynamics, and gender relations. The chapters all focus on the meeting and intermingling of religious with psychotherapeutic ideas and draw on a wide range of case studies including: how temple and shrine ‘cures’ of early modern Japan fared in the light of German neuropsychiatry; how Japanese Buddhist theories of mind, body, and self-cultivation negotiated with the findings of western medicine; how Buddhists, Christians, and other organizations and groups drew and redrew the lines between religious praxis and psychological healing; how major European therapies such as Freud’s fed into self-consciously Japanese analyses of and treatments for the ills of the age; and how distress, suffering, and individuality came to be reinterpreted across the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, from the southern islands of Okinawa to the devastated northern neighbourhoods of the Tohoku region after the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disasters of March 2011. Religion and Psychotherapy in Modern Japan will be welcomed by students and scholars working across a broad range of subjects, including Japanese culture and society, religious studies, psychology and psychotherapy, mental health, and international history.

Internationalizing the History of Psychology

Internationalizing the History of Psychology

While the United States was dominant in the development of psychology for much of the twentieth century, other countries have experienced significant growth in this area since the end of World War II. The percentage of those in the discipline who live and work in the United States has been growing smaller, and it is now impossible to completely understand the field if developments in psychology outside of the United States are ignored. Internationalizing the History of Psychology brings together luminaries in the field from around the world to address the internationalizing of psychology, each raising core issuesconcerning what an international perspective can contributeto the history of psychology and to our understanding of psychology as a whole. For too long, much of what we havetaken to be the history of psychology has actually been thehistory of American psychology. This volume, ideal for student use and for those in the field, illuminates how what we have been missing may change our views of the nature of psychology and its history. Contributors: Ruben Ardila, Geoffrey Blowers, Adrian C. Brock, Kurt Danziger, Aydan Gulerce, John D. Hogan, Naomi Lee, Johann Louw, Fathali M. Moghaddam, Anand C. Paranjpe, Irmingard Staeuble, Cecilia Taiana, and Thomas P. Vaccaro.

Civilization and Monsters

Spirits of Modernity in Meiji Japan

Civilization and Monsters

Discusses the representation/role of the supernatural or the "fantastic" in the construction of Japanese modernism in late 19th and early 20th century Japan.

Monumenta Nipponica

Monumenta Nipponica

Includes section "Reviews".