Improving the Effectiveness of Air Force Squadron Commanders

Assessing Squadron Commander Responsibilities, Preparation, and Resources

Improving the Effectiveness of Air Force Squadron Commanders

This study used a variety of data sources and interviews with squadron, group, and wing commanders to develop recommendations for how the Air Force can address commander responsibilities, improve commander preparation, and refine resource monitoring.

The Bass Handbook of Leadership

Theory, Research, and Managerial Applications

The Bass Handbook of Leadership

For thirty-three years and through three editions, Bass & Stogdill's Handbook of Leadership has been the indispensable bible for every serious student of leadership. Since the third edition came out in 1990, the field of leadership has expanded by an order of magnitude. This completely revised and updated fourth edition reflects the growth and changes in the study of leadership over the past seventeen years, with new chapters on transformational leadership, ethics, presidential leadership, and executive leadership. Throughout the Handbook, the contributions from cognitive social psychology and the social, political, communications, and administrative sciences have been expanded. As in the third edition, Bernard Bass begins with a consideration of the definitions and concepts used, and a brief review of some of the betterknown theories. Professor Bass then focuses on the personal traits, tendencies, attributes, and values of leaders and the knowledge, intellectual competence, and technical skills required for leadership. Next he looks at leaders' socioemotional talents and interpersonal competencies, and the differences in these characteristics in leaders who are imbued with ideologies, especially authoritarianism, Machiavellianism, and self-aggrandizement. A fuller examination of the values, needs, and satisfactions of leaders follows, and singled out for special attention are competitiveness and the preferences for taking risks. In his chapters on personal characteristics, Bass examines the esteem that others generally accord to leaders as a consequence of the leaders' personalities. The many theoretical and research developments about charisma over the past thirty years are crucial and are explored here in depth. Bass has continued to develop his theory of transformational leadership -- the paradigm of the last twenty years -- and he details how it makes possible the inclusion of a much wider range of phenomena than when theory and modeling are limited to reinforcement strategies. He also details the new incarnations of transformational leadership since the last edition. Bass has greatly expanded his consideration of women and racial minorities, both of whom are increasingly taking on leadership roles. A glossary is included to assist specialists in a particular academic discipline who may be unfamiliar with terms used in other fields. Business professors and students, executives in every industry, and politicians at all levels have relied for years on the time-honored guidance and insight afforded by the Handbook.

Creating a Software Engineering Culture

Creating a Software Engineering Culture

This is the digital version of the printed book (Copyright © 1996). Written in a remarkably clear style, Creating a Software Engineering Culture presents a comprehensive approach to improving the quality and effectiveness of the software development process. In twenty chapters spread over six parts, Wiegers promotes the tactical changes required to support process improvement and high-quality software development. Throughout the text, Wiegers identifies scores of culture builders and culture killers, and he offers a wealth of references to resources for the software engineer, including seminars, conferences, publications, videos, and on-line information. With case studies on process improvement and software metrics programs and an entire part on action planning (called “What to Do on Monday”), this practical book guides the reader in applying the concepts to real life. Topics include software culture concepts, team behaviors, the five dimensions of a software project, recognizing achievements, optimizing customer involvement, the project champion model, tools for sharing the vision, requirements traceability matrices, the capability maturity model, action planning, testing, inspections, metrics-based project estimation, the cost of quality, and much more! Principles from Part 1 Never let your boss or your customer talk you into doing a bad job. People need to feel the work they do is appreciated. Ongoing education is every team member’s responsibility. Customer involvement is the most critical factor in software quality. Your greatest challenge is sharing the vision of the final product with the customer. Continual improvement of your software development process is both possible and essential. Written software development procedures can help build a shared culture of best practices. Quality is the top priority; long-term productivity is a natural consequence of high quality. Strive to have a peer, rather than a customer, find a defect. A key to software quality is to iterate many times on all development steps except coding: Do this once. Managing bug reports and change requests is essential to controlling quality and maintenance. If you measure what you do, you can learn to do it better. You can’t change everything at once. Identify those changes that will yield the greatest benefits, and begin to implement them next Monday. Do what makes sense; don’t resort to dogma.

The Perfect Waltz

The Perfect Waltz

Society rogue Sebastian Reyne's search for a practical wife comes to a crashing halt when he dances with the effervescent Hope Merridew--and is seduced into a delicious intrigue of sensuality and desire.

Air Force

Official Service Journal of the U.S. Army Air Forces

Air Force


Commanding an Air Force Squadron in the Twenty-first Century

A Practical Guide of Tips and Techniques for Today's Squadron Commander

Commanding an Air Force Squadron in the Twenty-first Century

"Jeffry Smith updates the earlier release of Col Timothy T. Timmon's Commanding an Air Force Squadron (1993). In this book, which includes a foreword by Gen John P. Jumper and an introduction by Colonel Timmons, USAF, retired, Colonel Smith relies on the vast "insights, experiences, and recommendations" of former and current commanders to identify the attributes of a successful commander at multiple levels. He identifies some issues commanders face regardless of the level of command, including counseling personnel, dorm inspections, commanders' calls, money management, and the roles of spouses and families. According to Colonel Smith, the conduct of individuals in times of crises is the truest barometer of a good commander."--Publisher website.