If This Is the Way the World Works

Science, Congregations, and Leadership

If This Is the Way the World Works

In If This Is the Way the World Works William O. Avery and Beth Ann Gaede ask two primary questions: First, what principles from science are so broadly accepted that scientists themselves are willing to say, "This is the way the world works"? Second, how do congregations and their leaders behave when they operate in concert with these seemingly universal principles? Avery and Gaede explore five principles form the philosophy of science that suggest an alternative way to view congregational mission and leadership: openness to new information, complexity, diversity, interrelatedness, and process. Their premise is that when faith communities align themselves with the way the world--God's world--works, they more faithfully carry out their vocations as witnesses to God's reconciling work and as servants to one another. By following these basic scientific principles, Avery and Gaede argue, we arrive at a different view of leadership in the church. If this is truly the way the world works, leaders will find strength through relationships, hope in diversity, and above all trust in the love of God.

The Object Primer

Agile Model-Driven Development with UML 2.0

The Object Primer

Scott Ambler, award-winning author of Building Object Applications that Work, Process Patterns, and More Process Patterns, has revised his acclaimed first book, The Object Primer. Long prized in its original edition by both students and professionals as the best introduction to object-oriented technology, this book has all modeling notation rewritten in UML 2.0. All chapters have been revised to take advantage of Agile Modeling (AM), which is presented in the new chapter 2 along with other important modeling techniques. Review questions at the end of each chapter allow readers to test their newly acquired knowledge. In addition, the author takes time to reflect on the lessons learned over the past few years by discussing the proven benefits and drawbacks of the technology. This is the perfect book for any software development professional or student seeking an introduction to the concepts and terminology of object technology.

The Way the World Works

The Way the World Works

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the book which helped launch the current economic miracle, Gateway Books is proudly repackaging and re-releasing The Way the World Works. Jude Wanniski's masterpiece defined the economic policies of the 1980s responsible for a booming stock market, the creation of thirty million new jobs, untold wealth, and unparalleled prosperity.

Blue Sky God

The Evolution of Science and Christianity

Blue Sky God

Blue Sky God interprets some new scientific theories with blue sky thinking to bring radical insights into God, Jesus and humanity, drawing also on some deep wells from the past in the writings of the early Christians. In an accessible style, it looks at science research and theories in areas such as quantum physics and consciousness, epigenetics, morphic resonance and the zero point field. From there, seeing God as the compassionate consciousness at the ground of being, it draws together strands to do with unitive consciousness and the Wisdom way of the heart. Throughout, it seeks to encourage an evolution in understanding of the Christian message by reinterpreting much of the theological language and meaning that has become ‘orthodoxy’ in the West. In doing so, it challenges many of the standard assumptions of Western Christianity. It outlines a spiritual path that includes elements from all of the world's great religions, is not exclusive, and yet has a place of centrality for Jesus the Christ as a Wisdom teacher of the path of transformative love.

A Flash of Green

A Novel

A Flash of Green

A Flash of Green tells the gripping story of small-town corruption and two people brave enough to fight back, featuring many of the themes John D. MacDonald explored better than anyone in his legendary career as a leading crime novelist. Introduction by Dean Koontz The opportunists have taken over Palm City. Silent and deadly, like the snakes that infest the nearby swamps, they lay hidden from view, waiting for the right moment to strike. Political subterfuge has already eased the residents toward selling out. All that’s left now is to silence a few stubborn holdouts. James Wing is only trying to help a friend’s widow. At least that’s what he tells himself after warning Kat Hubble that the beautiful bay she and her neighbors have struggled to save is going to be sold to developers. He knows that he shouldn’t have told her anything. He’s a reporter, trained to reveal nothing. But he’s falling in love with her. Now cutthroats have set their sights on Kat—and they’ll do anything, use anyone, to stop her from interfering in their plans. Praise for John D. MacDonald “John D. MacDonald was the great entertainer of our age, and a mesmerizing storyteller.”—Stephen King “The first modern writer to nail Florida dead-center, to capture all its languid sleaze, racy sense of promise, and breath-grabbing beauty.”—Carl Hiaasen “To diggers a thousand years from now, the works of John D. MacDonald would be a treasure on the order of the tomb of Tutankhamen.”—Kurt Vonnegut

How the World Works

How the World Works

According to The New York Times, Noam Chomsky is “arguably the most important intellectual alive.” But he isn’t easy to read . . . or at least he wasn’t until these books came along. Made up of intensively edited speeches and interviews, they offer something not found anywhere else: pure Chomsky, with every dazzling idea and penetrating insight intact, delivered in clear, accessible, reader-friendly prose. Published as four short books in the famous Real Story series—What Uncle Sam Really Wants; The Prosperous Few and the Restless Many; Secrets, Lies and Democracy; and The Common Good—they’ve collectively sold almost 600,000 copies. And they continue to sell year after year after year because Chomsky’s ideas become, if anything, more relevant as time goes by. For example, twenty years ago he pointed out that “in 1970, about 90% of international capital was used for trade and long-term investment—more or less productive things—and 10% for speculation. By 1990, those figures had reversed.” As we know, speculation continued to increase exponentially. We’re paying the price now for not heeding him them.

The little book of ethics: A human values approach

A Human Values Approach

The little book of ethics: A human values approach

Ethics is a central part of our lives. It is as basic and pervasive as thinking and feeling. And it is not just what keeps us compliant with the law, it is the gateway to the quality of our relationships and the spiritual fulfilment of our lives. The Little Book of Ethics introduces us to ethics through the lens of values, and offers us five core human values - honesty, peace, right action, love and insight. It shows how these values are applied in different domains of our lives, and relates them to six aims of human life, where ethics is united with meaning and purpose.

The Sacred Project of American Sociology

The Sacred Project of American Sociology

Counter to popular perceptions, contemporary American sociology is and promotes a profoundly sacred project at heart. Sociology today is in fact animated by sacred impulses, driven by sacred commitments, and serves a sacred project. Sociology appears on the surface to be a secular, scientific enterprise--its founding fathers were mostly atheists. Its basic operating premises are secular and naturalistic. Sociologists today are disproportionately not religious, compared to all Americans, and often irreligious. The Sacred Project of American Sociology shows, counter-intuitively, that the secular enterprise that everyday sociology appears to be pursuing is actually not what is really going on at sociology's deepest level. Christian Smith conducts a self-reflexive, tables-turning, cultural and institutional sociology of the profession of American sociology itself, showing that this allegedly secular discipline ironically expresses Emile Durkheim's inescapable sacred, exemplifies its own versions of Marxist false consciousness, and generates a spirited reaction against Max Weber's melancholically observed disenchantment of the world. American sociology does not escape the analytical net that it casts over the rest of the ordinary world. Sociology itself is a part of that very human, very social, often very sacred and spiritual world. And sociology's ironic mis-recognition of its own sacred project leads to a variety of arguably self-destructive and distorting tendencies. This book re-asserts a vision for what sociology is most important for, in contrast with its current commitments, and calls sociologists back to a more honest, fair, and healthy vision of its purpose.

Frames in the Toxicity Controversy

Risk Assessment and Policy Analysis Related to the Dutch Chlorine Debate and the Swedish PVC Debate

Frames in the Toxicity Controversy

Preface When you write a book like this after ten years' working as an environmental specialist, you end up with something that reflects your career. Of course, when I started working at the Ministry of the Environment in the Netherlands, I could not foresee that I would now be at TNO, nor that I would have performed research into chlorine, PVC, waste, etc. , that would come to form the basis for this book. But step by step, with some coincidence and with the support of several people - who were probably unaware of the crucial role that, with hindsight, they played - I arrived at a position where I could start to consider this enterprise. At this point I shall try something dangerous - thanking a few of those people who gave that support. At the same time, it is obvious that I cannot mention them all. I hope that those whom I do not mention will forgive me. A first, crucial moment in this sequence of events came quite soon after I joined TNO in 1990. Just a few weeks later, all the senior staff in my section decided to leave in order to set up their own company. I decided to stay at TNO. As a consequence, I had to manage it on my own.

The Poetics of Grace: Christian Ethics as Theodicy

Volume 1, The Hope of God’s Calling

The Poetics of Grace: Christian Ethics as Theodicy

What is God doing about a world marked by conflict and division? What about a world in which our technologies promise great good but also threaten our existence? What is God doing in a world where the demands for accumulation and acquisition create division and despair? Can Christians hope to be of positive influence in a world that does not always support, reflect, or even understand Christian commitments? Christian ethics often raises such questions as these, and the possible answers vary widely. Paul's Letter to the Ephesians is a tremendous resource for exploring a faithful response to perhaps the toughest question of all: what is God doing about evil? The role of Christian ethics is to take seriously the challenge that, whatever God is doing, God calls us to participate in a distinctive task that embraces our own commitments and labors within the divine purpose. Ephesians says that God has taken the initiative to pursue that purpose and, remarkably, offers that we ourselves are part of the answer to the question, what is God doing about evil?