Human Performance on the Flight Deck

Human Performance on the Flight Deck

Taking an integrated, systems approach to dealing exclusively with the human performance issues encountered on the flight deck of the modern airliner, this book describes the inter-relationships between the various application areas of human factors, recognising that the human contribution to the operation of an airliner does not fall into neat pigeonholes. The relationship between areas such as pilot selection, training, flight deck design and safety management is continually emphasised within the book. It also affirms the upside of human factors in aviation - the positive contribution that it can make to the industry - and avoids placing undue emphasis on when the human component fails. The book is divided into four main parts. Part one describes the underpinning science base, with chapters on human information processing, workload, situation awareness, decision making, error and individual differences. Part two of the book looks at the human in the system, containing chapters on pilot selection, simulation and training, stress, fatigue and alcohol, and environmental stressors. Part three takes a closer look at the machine (the aircraft), beginning with an examination of flight deck display design, followed by chapters on aircraft control, flight deck automation, and HCI on the flight deck. Part four completes the volume with a consideration of safety management issues, both on the flight deck and across the airline; the final chapter in this section looks at human factors for incident and accident investigation. The book is written for professionals within the aviation industry, both on the flight deck and elsewhere, for post-graduate students and for researchers working in the area.

Human Factors for Civil Flight Deck Design

Human Factors for Civil Flight Deck Design

Addressees all the human factors issues pertinent to the design of modern flight decks, from the design of the pilot's seats and workspace to the cognitive ergonomics of the flight management computer interface.

Human Performance and Limitations in Aviation

Human Performance and Limitations in Aviation

Human error is cited as a major cause in over 70% of accidents, andit is widely agreed that a better understanding of humancapabilities and limitations - both physical and psychological -would help reduce human error and improve flight safety. This book was first published when the UK Civil AviationAuthority introduced an examination in human performance andlimitations for all private and professional pilot licences. Nowthe Joint Aviation Authorities of Europe have published a newsyllabus as part of their Joint Aviation Requirements for FlightCrew Licensing. The book has been completely revised and rewritten to takeaccount of the new syllabus. The coverage of basic aviationpsychology has been greatly expanded, and the section on aviationphysiology now includes topics on the high altitude environment andon health maintenance. Throughout, the text avoids excessive jargonand technical language. "There is no doubt that this book provides an excellent basicunderstanding of the human body, its limitations, the psychologicalprocesses and how they interact with the aviation environment. I amcurrently studying for my ATPL Ground Exams and I found this bookto be an invaluable aid. It is equally useful for those studyingfor the PPL and for all pilots who would like to be reminded oftheir physiological and psychological limitations." –General Aviation, June 2002

The Glass Cage

Where Automation is Taking Us

The Glass Cage

In The Glass Cage, Pulitzer Prize nominee and bestselling author Nicholas Carr shows how the most important decisions of our lives are now being made by machines and the radical effect this is having on our ability to learn and solve problems. In May 2009 an Airbus A330 passenger jet equipped with the latest ‘glass cockpit’ controls plummeted 30,000 feet into the Atlantic. The reason for the crash: the autopilot had routinely switched itself off. In fact, automation is everywhere – from the thermostat in our homes and the GPS in our phones to the algorithms of High Frequency Trading and self-driving cars. We now use it to diagnose patients, educate children, evaluate criminal evidence and fight wars. But psychological studies show that we perform best when fully involved in a task, while the principle of automation – that humans are inefficient – is self-fulfilling. The glass cockpit is becoming a glass cage. In this utterly engrossing exposé, bestselling writer Nicholas Carr reveals how automation is affecting our ability to solve problems, forge memories and acquire skills. Rather than rejecting technology, Carr argues that we must urgently rethink its role in our lives, using it to enhance rather than diminish the extraordinary abilities that make us human.

Human Factors on the Flight Deck

Safe Piloting Behaviour in Practice

Human Factors on the Flight Deck

What is for a professional pilot required to fly as safe as possible? Written by pilots the book gives a detailed introduction into the basics of accident prevention in air traffic. Explicit background knowledge as well as detailed listings of safety relevant features in human behaviour are included.

Handbook of Aviation Human Factors, Second Edition

Handbook of Aviation Human Factors, Second Edition

A complete examination of issues and concepts relating to human factors in simulation, this book covers theory and application in space, ships, submarines, naval aviation, and commercial aviation. The authors examine issues of simulation and their effect on the validity and functionality of simulators as a training device. The chapters contain in depth discussions of these particular characteristics and issues. They also incorporate theories pertaining to the motivational aspects of training, simulation of social events, and PC based simulation.

Human-computer Interaction, INTERACT '99

IFIP TC.13 International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 30th August -3rd September 1999, Edinburgh, UK

Human-computer Interaction, INTERACT '99


Engineering Psychology & Human Performance

Engineering Psychology & Human Performance

Forming connections between human performance and design Engineering Psychology and Human Performance, 4e examines human-machine interaction. The book is organized directly from the psychological perspective of human information processing. The chapters generally correspond to the flow of information as it is processed by a human being--from the senses, through the brain, to action--rather than from the perspective of system components or engineering design concepts. This book is ideal for a psychology student, engineering student, or actual practitioner in engineering psychology, human performance, and human factors Learning Goals Upon completing this book, readers should be able to: * Identify how human ability contributes to the design of technology. * Understand the connections within human information processing and human performance. * Challenge the way they think about technology's influence on human performance. * show how theoretical advances have been, or might be, applied to improving human-machine interaction

Automation Airmanship: Nine Principles for Operating Glass Cockpit Aircraft

Automation Airmanship: Nine Principles for Operating Glass Cockpit Aircraft

"One of the first cohesive works on glass cockpit equipment (digital instrumentation being implemented in more aircraft), this book focuses on limiting in-flight issues and advancing the safe operation of highly automated aircraft"-Provided by publisher.

Human Factors Models for Aviation Accident Analysis and Prevention

Human Factors Models for Aviation Accident Analysis and Prevention

Aviation is a complex system, and the investigation and modelling of aviation accident causation can suffer from being artificially manipulated into non-complex models and methods. This book addresses this issue by developing a new approach to investigating aviation accident causation through information networks, which centralise communication and the flow of information as key indicators of a system’s health and risk. The book’s new model offers many potential developments and some key areas are studied in this research, maintaining firm focus on the overall health of a system.