Growing a Revolution Bringing Our Soil Back to Life

In Growing a Revolution, geologist David R. Montgomery travels the world, meeting farmers at the forefront of an agricultural movement to restore soil health.

Growing a Revolution  Bringing Our Soil Back to Life

Finalist for the PEN/E. O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award “A call to action that underscores a common goal: to change the world from the ground up.”—Dan Barber, author of The Third Plate For centuries, agricultural practices have eroded the soil that farming depends on, stripping it of the organic matter vital to its productivity. Now conventional agriculture is threatening disaster for the world’s growing population. In Growing a Revolution, geologist David R. Montgomery travels the world, meeting farmers at the forefront of an agricultural movement to restore soil health. From Kansas to Ghana, he sees why adopting the three tenets of conservation agriculture—ditching the plow, planting cover crops, and growing a diversity of crops—is the solution. When farmers restore fertility to the land, this helps feed the world, cool the planet, reduce pollution, and return profitability to family farms.

Incredible Plant Veg Grow a Revolution

But a once-forgotten Yorkshire mill town is spreading a new story of hope… This is the tale of an extraordinary local food movement that has become a worldwide phenomenon.

Incredible  Plant Veg  Grow a Revolution

Incredible! reveals how one town decided to take control of its own future – with vegetables. The future looks bleak. The economy’s in the doldrums. We’ve lost faith in politicians and big business. Over all that looms the threat of climate change – extreme weather is already sending shock waves through global food supplies. But a once-forgotten Yorkshire mill town is spreading a new story of hope… This is the tale of an extraordinary local food movement that has become a worldwide phenomenon. Told by Pam Warhurst, co-founder of Incredible Edible Todmorden, and writer Joanna Dobson, the book invites readers into a humorous, inspiring and often moving series of stories that brought people together through the simple method of planting vegetables in public places. People have found that when they put edible plants in their front gardens, they get to know their neighbours, building a community one conversation at a time. When they grow fruit trees at school, children learn life skills. And when market traders stock local produce, they build business networks. Incredible Edible Todmorden has sparked similar projects across the world – and it could be your story, too! Incredible! Plant Veg, Grow a Revolution has an international audience, appealing to anyone who cares about the environment, gardening, community, education or local enterprise.

The Hidden Half of Nature The Microbial Roots of Life and Health

Restoring life to their barren yard and recovering from a health crisis, David R. Montgomery and Anne Biklé discover astounding parallels between the botanical world and our own bodies.

The Hidden Half of Nature  The Microbial Roots of Life and Health

"Sure to become a game-changing guide to the future of good food and healthy landscapes." —Dan Barber, chef and author of The Third Plate Prepare to set aside what you think you know about yourself and microbes. The Hidden Half of Nature reveals why good health—for people and for plants—depends on Earth’s smallest creatures. Restoring life to their barren yard and recovering from a health crisis, David R. Montgomery and Anne Biklé discover astounding parallels between the botanical world and our own bodies. From garden to gut, they show why cultivating beneficial microbiomes holds the key to transforming agriculture and medicine.

Digging the Past

Montgomery, Growing a Revolution, 18. See esp. Montgomery's chapter, “The
Oldest Problem,” in Growing a Revolution, 51–65; Montgomery, Dirt, xii, 23, 24;
and Albert Howard, The Soil and Health: A Study of Organic Agriculture (1947;
repr., ...

Digging the Past

"This book is about seventeenth-century antecedents of modern concerns with food and the environment: depletion of the earth's resources, agricultural innovation and its ill effects on the environment, and nostalgia for an earlier and simpler time"--

Child of the Revolution

It's a story set in a world of uncertainty and revolutionary upheaval, where a 10-year-old swears allegiance to Lenin, Marx and the legendary Che Guevara under swaying palm trees, with no idea of what it all means, except this is the only ...

Child of the Revolution

Cuba, a land of cigars, hot nights, sultry music and romantic revolutionary heroes. But what was it really like to live in Fidel Castro's tropical paradise? With an evocative wide-eyed innocence, Luis M. Garcia takes us back to his Cuban childhood and his parents' dreams of escape. Child of the Revolution is a story about growing up in an extraordinary place at an extraordinary time, as the superpowers prepared to go to war over nuclear missiles installed on the tiny Caribbean island. It's a story set in a world of uncertainty and revolutionary upheaval, where a 10-year-old swears allegiance to Lenin, Marx and the legendary Che Guevara under swaying palm trees, with no idea of what it all means, except this is the only way to become a better revolutionary' and get out of school early. It is also the story of brothers and sisters torn apart by politics and how a Cuban teenager and his family end up by sheer accident - on the other side of the world. Warm, generous and gently amusing, Child of the Revolution stirs the heart and brings music to the soul.

The Rocks Don t Lie

Using rocks as proof, a geologist examines the great flood stories found in many cultures and religions and travels across countries and landscapes to discover a place where theology and science converge. 13,000 first printing.

The Rocks Don t Lie

Using rocks as proof, a geologist examines the great flood stories found in many cultures and religions and travels across countries and landscapes to discover a place where theology and science converge. 13,000 first printing.

James Wong s Homegrown Revolution

Introduction Join the revolution! So what's wrong with spuds, sprouts and swedes
? As every glossy magazine and middle-class dinner party conversation will tell
you, we are living amid a great grow your own revolution. What was once ...

James Wong s Homegrown Revolution

A revolution in the garden - a completely new range of fruit and vegetables to grow and eat. Whether it's a window box of homegrown saffron, your very own kiwi vine or a mini green tea plantation on your patio, TV botanist and best-selling author James Wong proves that 'growing your own' can be so much more exciting than spuds, sprouts and swede. Breaking free from the 'dig for victory' time warp of allotment staples, James reveals the vast array of 21st century crops that will flourish outdoors, even in our blustery North Atlantic climate - no greenhouse necessary. From goji berries to food-mile free sweet potatoes, James' revolutionary approach to edible gardening will show you how to grow, cook and eat all manner of superfood crops that are just as easy (if not easier) and far more exciting to grow than the 'ration book' favourites. Inspiring, fun and full of plant know-how, this book is set to revolutionise the whole concept of 'growing your own' for newbie growers to seasoned allotment veterans alike. You'll never look at your garden the same way again!

A Revolution Down on the Farm

A Revolution Down on the Farm: The Transformation of American Agriculture since 1929 charts the profound changes in farming that have occurred during author Paul K. Conkin’s lifetime.

A Revolution Down on the Farm

At a time when food is becoming increasingly scarce in many parts of the world and food prices are skyrocketing, no industry is more important than agriculture. Humans have been farming for thousands of years, and yet agriculture has undergone more fundamental changes in the past 80 years than in the previous several centuries. In 1900, 30 million American farmers tilled the soil or tended livestock; today there are fewer than 4.5 million farmers who feed a population four times larger than it was at the beginning of the century. Fifty years ago, the planet could not have sustained a population of 6.5 billion; now, commercial and industrial agriculture ensure that millions will not die from starvation. Farmers are able to feed an exponentially growing planet because the greatest industrial revolution in history has occurred in agriculture since 1929, with U.S. farmers leading the way. Productivity on American farms has increased tenfold, even as most small farmers and tenants have been forced to find other work. Today, only 300,000 farms produce approximately ninety percent of the total output, and overproduction, largely subsidized by government programs and policies, has become the hallmark of modern agriculture. A Revolution Down on the Farm: The Transformation of American Agriculture since 1929 charts the profound changes in farming that have occurred during author Paul K. Conkin’s lifetime. His personal experiences growing up on a small Tennessee farm complement compelling statistical data as he explores America’s vast agricultural transformation and considers its social, political, and economic consequences. He examines the history of American agriculture, showing how New Deal innovations evolved into convoluted commodity programs following World War II. Conkin assesses the skills, new technologies, and government policies that helped transform farming in America and suggests how new legislation might affect farming in decades to come. Although the increased production and mechanization of farming has been an economic success story for Americans, the costs are becoming increasingly apparent. Small farmers are put out of business when they cannot compete with giant, non-diversified corporate farms. Caged chickens and hogs in factory-like facilities or confined dairy cattle require massive amounts of chemicals and hormones ultimately ingested by consumers. Fertilizers, new organic chemicals, manure disposal, and genetically modified seeds have introduced environmental problems that are still being discovered. A Revolution Down on the Farm concludes with an evaluation of farming in the twenty-first century and a distinctive meditation on alternatives to our present large scale, mechanized, subsidized, and fossil fuel and chemically dependent system.

The Measures of Ministry to Prevent a Revolution are the Certain Means of Bringing it On Second Edition Signed at End a Stoic I e A O Connor Afterwards Condorcet O Connor

If the pre - disposing order of things is so instituted as to cause this fund to grow ,
with the growing population , the people ... along with it ; it converts the fufferers
into furies , and drives them F % 1 them raging into all the horrors of revolution .

The Measures of Ministry to Prevent a Revolution  are the Certain Means of Bringing it On  Second Edition   Signed at End  a Stoic  I e  A  O Connor  Afterwards Condorcet O Connor


The Marketplace of Revolution

As a free person, he struggled to make a living in “plantation work,” which in his
case meant growing a little tobacco. During one fleeting moment in 1767 when
his prospects seemed to improve, this poor farmer decided “to go to house
keepin.

The Marketplace of Revolution

The Marketplace of Revolution offers a boldly innovative interpretation of the mobilization of ordinary Americans on the eve of independence. Breen explores how colonists who came from very different ethnic and religious backgrounds managed to overcome difference and create a common cause capable of galvanizing resistance. In a richly interdisciplinary narrative that weaves insights into a changing material culture with analysis of popular political protests, Breen shows how virtual strangers managed to communicate a sense of trust that effectively united men and women long before they had established a nation of their own. The Marketplace of Revolution argues that the colonists' shared experience as consumers in a new imperial economy afforded them the cultural resources that they needed to develop a radical strategy of political protest--the consumer boycott. Never before had a mass political movement organized itself around disruption of the marketplace. As Breen demonstrates, often through anecdotes about obscure Americans, communal rituals of shared sacrifice provided an effective means to educate and energize a dispersed populace. The boycott movement--the signature of American resistance--invited colonists traditionally excluded from formal political processes to voice their opinions about liberty and rights within a revolutionary marketplace, an open, raucous public forum that defined itself around subscription lists passed door-to-door, voluntary associations, street protests, destruction of imported British goods, and incendiary newspaper exchanges. Within these exchanges was born a new form of politics in which ordinary man and women--precisely the people most often overlooked in traditional accounts of revolution--experienced an exhilarating surge of empowerment. Breen recreates an "empire of goods" that transformed everyday life during the mid-eighteenth century. Imported manufactured items flooded into the homes of colonists from New Hampshire to Georgia. The Marketplace of Revolution explains how at a moment of political crisis Americans gave political meaning to the pursuit of happiness and learned how to make goods speak to power.